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Sorry if this is long. I love this stuff.

My first question would be what type of classical music got you into it?
Orchestra, solo instrument, small ensembles, a movie scene, etc

I like to separate into classical periods, examples: Baroque (Bach, Vivaldi, Pachelbel), classical classical, (Mozart, Haydn) romantic (Beethoven, Brahms, many), impressionistic (Debussy, Ravel), nazi banned late romantic geniuses like Mahler. There are so many, especially when you get instrument specific. Then you discover South American, Cuban, Spanish etc music that wasn't well known and it blows your away.

How about Beethoven Symphony No. 8 in F Major, 2nd movement. It's easy on the ears, genius, has what would be considered comedy for it's time, melodic, short, and easy to dismantle without knowing theory.

But when all else fails just listen to a lot of Chopin.
I love anything on the Telarc label, specifically anything by Eric Kunzel and The Cincinnati Orchestra, for great sounding recordings of large orchestral works. A few of my go to's:

Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, op 14 Varujan Kojian & The Utah Symphony

Prokofiev Syntian Suite,op. 20 Eduardo Mata & The Dallas Symphony

Dvorak Symphony #9 Wolfgang Sawallisch & The Philadelphia Orchestra
Not sure whether most of you fine folks would classify opera as classical music or whether it's its own genre, but I think of it as classical.

That said, there's a CD entitled The Movies Go to the Opera that I'm quite certain I listened to more than any other classical music CD. It's got a lot of the show-stopper arias and overtures that most people are familiar with, either from opera or from association with a well-known movie, and I never tire of listening to them. Probably in my Top 10 albums of all time.
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Originally posted by Rothko:
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Originally posted by spo:
I am starting to enjoy classical music more.


You want to really feel old? Listen to the modern rap stuff. I swear, when I hear it, I turn into an old man complaining about how the new music is crap and kids should stay off my lawn.


i grew up with 80s and 90s rap and I too feel like an old man complaining about how thew new "rap" music is even music.
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Originally posted by g-man:
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Originally posted by Rothko:
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Originally posted by spo:
I am starting to enjoy classical music more.


You want to really feel old? Listen to the modern rap stuff. I swear, when I hear it, I turn into an old man complaining about how the new music is crap and kids should stay off my lawn.


i grew up with 80s and 90s rap and I too feel like an old man complaining about how thew new "rap" music is even music.


Rap is brutal with the exception of Eminem. I heard Cardi B on Howard Stern's show. Had no idea she was a rapper and to listen to her speak one would think she has a second grade education. Music is today is pretty bad (there are exceptions).
I assume the OP is asking for actual recordings, not just composers, so:

Anything by Murray Perahia especially the Mozart and Beethoven Piano Concertos...I like Mozart 19/23 - perhaps because it was the first CD I purchased back in 1985 for my swanky new $700 NEC CD player! Joys of shopping at J&R Music World...

Carlos Kleiber Beethoven Symphonies 5&7

Bach Cello Suites by Rostropovich...though there are a good dozen or more recordings all with their own merits.

That should give you a few places to start.
Isaac Stern's 60th birthday concert with Pinchas Zukerman and Itzhak Perlman, Zubin Menta conducting. Bach's double concerto, and unheralded Vivaldi triple concerto, and Mozart's triumphant synfonia concertante in e flat.

Yo yo ma, Bach's cello sonatas, especially the prelude.

Itzhak Perlman, Paganini's caprices

Amadeus sound track

Yo yo ma, itzhak Perlman, Emmanuel Ax and some other guy I can't remember, Brahms quartets

Kodaly Quartet, Haydn, Opus 76, #4 Sunrise string quartet

Andres Segovia the art of Segovia

Brandenburg by the Bach German soloists.

I could go on here...
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Originally posted by Arsenal4ever:
Started with symphonic and gradually moved to chamber. Especially like Piano Trios (Tchaikovsky Op. 30, Brahms Op 40) and piano/ violin quartets (Mozart, middle and late Beethoven).


Good call. I have a soft spot for chamber music as well, so many great pieces. Reminded of Sir Neville Mariner who led the Academy of St Martins in the field for so many years, RIP. I've got another great cd, Handel trio sonoatas for violin and continuo, Rachel Barton. Mozart has a couple of Oboe quartets, the post concerto and another.
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
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Originally posted by steve8:
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Originally posted by GlennK:
Do you still have an actual CD player?


Really? You don't? I probably about 600-700 CD's so I'm not throwing mine away anytime soon.


+1
Okay, maybe only 400 or so. Need a turn table as I have about 150 LPs also. I did get rid of my cassettes.


+2 I have approximately 1,500 CDs, about 250 classical discs and two cd players in my system. They will probably still be here when I'm gone.
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Originally posted by mdsphoto:
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
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Originally posted by steve8:
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Originally posted by GlennK:
Do you still have an actual CD player?


Really? You don't? I probably about 600-700 CD's so I'm not throwing mine away anytime soon.


+1
Okay, maybe only 400 or so. Need a turn table as I have about 150 LPs also. I did get rid of my cassettes.


+2 I have approximately 1,500 CDs, about 250 classical discs and two cd players in my system. They will probably still be here when I'm gone.
Went all digital a while ago. Haven’t had a CD player in more than 10 years.
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Originally posted by haggis:
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Originally posted by winetarelli:
Beethoven Symphonies No. 5 and 7: Carlos Kleiber & Vienna Philharmonic; Deutsche Gramophone Originals.

The best stereo rendition of either I!ve ever heard and the 7th is my favorite piece of music.


Those Kleiber recordings are fantastic.


Thanks gents. I may get the Kleiber CD. I the set of 9 by Karajan with the Berliner... which is great. 5 and 7 are two of my favorites.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
My first question would be what type of classical music got you into it?
Orchestra, solo instrument, small ensembles, a movie scene, etc


Hey WinoCA, Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusic, Rondo alla Turca and Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture. I really like Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition and Night on a Bare Mountain. I bought a few things from there, Stravinsky, Schostokovitch, Khatachurian.

Thanks for the recommendations everybody.
haggis posted:
winetarelli posted:

I already replied above as to my very favorite.

However, while not technically classical, I recently got the collection of Offenbach overtures by Bruno Weil & the Wiener Symphoniker and it is fantastic.

Are you defining "classical" as a period, rather than as a genre?

Well... kinda.  I'm defining it as different from Romantic or Baroque (or Modern).  

I would be more likely to call my wonderful (Deutsche Gramophone) Claudio Abbado & London Symphony Orchestra recording of Mendelssohn's Overtures "symphonic" or "Romantic" rather than "Classical".  Offenbach creates a different wrinkle because Mendelssohn's overtures were largely stand-alone pieces, whereas Offenbach's were generally originally intended to precede opera bouffe / operetta. To be honest, I've never really thought of opera as being bound by the same terminology as symphonic music.  I cannot, for example, recall referring to Fidelio or The Marriage of Figaro as anything but "opera" -- though, surely, there is tremendous distinction between them and the operas more often associated with Romantic times.  (Puccini, Rossini, Offenbach, etc.)

But that aside... aside: I am drawing a distinction between (for example) Mozart / Haydn / Beethoven* on the one hand and Offenbach / Mendelssohn / Rossini / Puccini / etc on another.  So, while I do hear a difference in genre, it is also a difference in era.  That asterisk is because I think Beethoven broke "Classical" music, as I am using it.  I think something else had to come next.

It might, at this time, behoove me to point out that I grew up with a father who was once offered the job of pianist for the Met.  (The opera, not the museum.)  (He followed a different professional path, but)  there is no escaping a Steinway B being practiced no matter how big your old colonial house is.  It was the bane of my existence as I grew up.  But he's also from where my love and knowledge of music stem.

(Also the reason I just edited that last sentence so it wouldn't end with a preposition. )

Last edited by winetarelli

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