for a farewell dinner with a good friend before she moves away, i need one bottle of a really nice aged, mature riesling. it's her favorite varietal, but she's never had a mature one. this will likely be drank and savored without food. kabinett or spatlese style, no sweeter please. i'm thinking $50ish, but am a little flexible there. what i can't be flexible about is i'd need this bottle in my hand by the end of the week. so a DC area seller would be preferred, or someone that could ship this pretty quickly. thanks in advance!
Original Post
Thanks, Board-O. Please educate me further, as many white varietals are sort of blind spot for me.

I had many rieslings at a Prum tasting a few years ago, and was really impressed by the ones that were around 10 years old and even older. I thought they were wonderfully aromatic and very complex in the mouth. But I recalled them being less sweet that the younger ones we tried (and we had wines of all sweetness levels), so I just assumed the older ones must have been kabinett or spatlese.

For this particular bottle, I'm looking for something as an aperitif, not a dessert wine.

Any further advice would be appreciated.
If it were me, I wouldn't go back too far. You'll get plenty of secondary characteristics for a 1996 or 1998 Prum or Christoffel Spatlese. I was thrilled by the 2001 MSR Rieslings. If you enjoy the petrol notes of a well-aged Rielsing, I'd look a little sweeter, maybe an Auslese from 1990, 1993, or 1994. Older than that will still be fine, but will be way over your $50 target, as will many Ausleses from any but the youngest vintages. Hopefully some people who enjoy older Kabinetts will chime in, but I'm not one of them.
If you don't like the petrol notes (I don't either.), you don't want an aged Riesling. My best recommendation would be to try a 2001 Spatlese from Christoffel-Erben or JJ Prum. They can't possibly not be excellent and you can probably find them in the $50 range, maybe less.
newsguy,

Well made dry Rieslings will age wonderfully. Sweetness level in a wine (in and of itself) does not make a wine more or less ageworthy. You will find great ageworthy dry Rieslings from Austria, Germany and Alsace. The petrol notes are another matter and BO is correct on that. If you don't like petrol you should avoid any Riesling over 10 years old because the risk of petrol notes in those wines is higher.

VM
Board-O: I will try to seek out that vintage and those producers.

Vino Me: Thanks much for the elaboration on the petrol notes. That's something I want to avoid personally, and definitely on this bottle for my friend.

I have a line on an Austrian bottle: 2000 Knoll Riesling Smaragd Loibenberg for $44.99, professionally stored. You folks think this might work? And *no* petrol?
quote:
Originally posted by newsguy:
Board-O: I will try to seek out that vintage and those producers.

Vino Me: Thanks much for the elaboration on the petrol notes. That's something I want to avoid personally, and definitely on this bottle for my friend.

I have a line on an Austrian bottle: 2000 Knoll Riesling Smaragd Loibenberg for $44.99, professionally stored. You folks think this might work? And *no* petrol?
This wine may not be what you are looking for if you are looking for a German Kabinett or Spatlese. This wine will have a more steely, mineral characteristic mixed with some of the fruit but in an overall much drier style. This will be more like an Alsatian than a German riesling.
Thanks for letting me know, inky. While I'd like that, this bottle is about my friend loving it. And she loves fruity rieslings. Might just try to grab a really nice '07 Germany riesling that doesn't have a ton of acidity. This is turning into a bit of effort. Wink

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