WOTY Predictions - Let's hear 'em.

Lots of highly-rated 2016 Vintage Ports to choose from, many with pretty wide distribution: Graham, Dow, Warre, Taylor Fladgate; at least one of them's going to be right up there.

I haven't been wrong about anything for almost an hour now, so I'm feeling pretty confident.

seaquam posted:

Lots of highly-rated 2016 Vintage Ports to choose from, many with pretty wide distribution: Graham, Dow, Warre, Taylor Fladgate; at least one of them's going to be right up there.

I haven't been wrong about anything for almost an hour now, so I'm feeling pretty confident.

I doubt a port will be WOTY.  The 2011 Dow was WOTY a couple of years ago.

doubled posted:
seaquam posted:

Lots of highly-rated 2016 Vintage Ports to choose from, many with pretty wide distribution: Graham, Dow, Warre, Taylor Fladgate; at least one of them's going to be right up there.

I haven't been wrong about anything for almost an hour now, so I'm feeling pretty confident.

I doubt a port will be WOTY.  The 2011 Dow was WOTY a couple of years ago.

You know it's a faulty award if having the varietal win WOTY in the last few years is a disqualifying feature.

It's a more interesting start to the list than in years past.  I'm not much of a zin drinker but have enjoyed the few Bedrocks I've tried and I know there is a very loyal fan base.  Love the wines of Terre Nere and they try provide tremendous value across the range of wines.  Hopefully prices stay in check! 

glennk posted:

It's a more interesting start to the list than in years past.  I'm not much of a zin drinker but have enjoyed the few Bedrocks I've tried and I know there is a very loyal fan base.  Love the wines of Terre Nere and they try provide tremendous value across the range of wines.  Hopefully prices stay in check! 

They're not all Zins

the heritage ones are typically field blends which may include zins.

Castello di Volpaia........."They are crushed and vinified in steel tanks, then aged in a mix of Slavonian oak casks (80 percent) and French oak barriques (20 percent) for two years."

I don't have the greatest or worst palate in the world, but I am 100% confident I could not tell the difference between a wine aged in 20% French barriques and 80% Slavonian oak casks or vice versa. 

Does the note about the wine mean that they construct barrels where the barrels themselves are 80--20, or, they remove the wine from one type of barrel at one point and put it in the other?  And, for how long do they keep it in the first?

I am sure the wine is terrific. But, sometimes it's a little too complicated for me.

g-man posted:

Or do you think it's that they age 80% of the juice in one type of barrel and 20% in the other then during bottling mix them both together?

Hmmm. That is a possibility. Either way, I think it highly likely that I would enjoy this wine. Maybe with a veal chop, from a calf that was fed 80% grass and 20% other stuff.

irwin posted:
g-man posted:

Or do you think it's that they age 80% of the juice in one type of barrel and 20% in the other then during bottling mix them both together?

Hmmm. That is a possibility. Either way, I think it highly likely that I would enjoy this wine. Maybe with a veal chop, from a calf that was fed 80% grass and 20% other stuff.

I feel like oyu'd get even more pleasure if the veal chop was strung together where 80% of it was grass fed and 20% was purely corn fed.

The 1996 Sass is one of my favorites.  The first time I had it was probably around 2010.  The last time was a year ago.  I don't remember being different, but it was still a delicious wine.   If I had  one bottle of the 2015, I would at least wait 10 years.  But if there was an occasion to open it sooner, why not?

Agreed Steve8.

The ‘98s are drinking but still tight.  

96 is drinking well.

I’ve had the opportunity to try some of these wines on release and they do offer enjoyment. However at that tariff, your money is better spent elsewhere if you’re planning on opening in the near future. 

The only prediction that I could make of which I would be 100% sure to be right is that the WS Top 10 gets less sensible every year.  Three wines in the Top 10 with production of less than 1000 cases which means at this point they will be nearly impossible to find.  Three wines with prices over $150 which means you and I cannot afford them.  Where is Chateau de Beaucastel with a score of 97 and a price below $100?  Where is Felton Road Pinot Noir at 96 points for a New Zealand Pinot?  Nothing from Piedmont!  How about Luigi Pira Barolo at 95 points at $39?  I would put Rocca delle Macie Chianti Classico Riserva in there for being a 94 point wine selling for $26 with a large production.  How about Leeuwin Chardonnay Art Series or Chateau Monbousquet?  Let's see an article outlining the reasoning behind their picks.

My best prediction every year is that someone will be outraged regardless of what the selections are. 

They will never select an inexpensive WOTY again. When it happened with Columbia Crest a few years back, some influential persons on this forum lost their minds. The editors are scared shitless of incurring that level of rage again. 

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