Tonight for dinner I had...

Calamari Scampi as an appetizer
and
Veal Saltimboca Alla Romano (Veal stuffed with prosccutio, basil, spinach and fontina cheese.

What wine would go with this? I was thinking Sauv Blanc, but I am not sure.

Now I know what you are thinking. "Spo1977, Why is an assh0le like you who drinks Canada Dry with white meat and Coca Cola with red meat bothering us for a wine pairing"? Well I have read in a few posts that some people consider wine wasted without food. I figure I can at least be aware of what wines go with the foods I like so I can begin trying wine with food. I would like to take advantage of the forum members knowledge on this matter.

Thank You in Advance.
Original Post
quote:
Veal Saltimboca Alla Romano (Veal stuffed with prosccutio, basil, spinach and fontina cheese.


Barolo or Brunello only. So much so that I wouldn't even order this meal without them to pair with it.

Sauv Blanc with the Calamari Scampi is fine, but there are several whites that would work too.
I would allow for a lot more options for the veal than Hunter...

Tokay Pinot Gris or Austrian or Alcasian Riesling would also work with the veal. So would a top-shelf white Hermitage with some age on it.

I would allow for a Barbaresco, a Barbera, Rosso di Montalcino, a Sangiovese-based Super Tuscan (eg. San Giusto a Retananno Percarlo or Altesino Rapace) or a good Chianti as well, in terms of red.

a

P.S. I agree that SB (esp NZ, Loire, or Austrian) is a good pairing for the Calamari Scampi and that some other dry, crisp, medium-bodied, floral whites would also work.
Not much to add to what's already been said. Stick with an Italian native red, Nebbiolo or Sangiovese. If you've got a Barolo or Barbaresco with age on it, go for it. Brunello would also work well, but if you're looking for something a little more reasonably priced, a Chianti Classico or Chianti Classico Riserva would do nicely.
quote:
Barolo or Brunello only. So much so that I wouldn't even order this meal without them to pair with it.


Hey Hunter,

I was in Trader Joe's and saw a Barolo for $13.99.
Until then the cheaprst on I had seen was the Dalmianno for $30.00. Would you assume the one at Trader Joe's is pretty foul?
quote:
Hey Hunter,

I was in Trader Joe's and saw a Barolo for $13.99.
Until then the cheaprst on I had seen was the Dalmianno for $30.00. Would you assume the one at Trader Joe's is pretty foul?


Spo, I would be very cautious buying any Barolo under $30. $13.99 - I wouldn't touch it. I would think it would be awful unless it is seriously mispriced. I don't think I have ever had a good one for less than $30. $40 is the lowest end for Brunello too.

If price is a factor, than a good Chianti will work, or a Nebbiolo like Futronic said. I don't like Rosso Di Montalcinos - some others here do. A good chianti gives you more in taste and better for the money IMO.
quote:
Originally posted by Hunter:
quote:
Veal Saltimboca Alla Romano (Veal stuffed with prosccutio, basil, spinach and fontina cheese.


Barolo or Brunello only.



For alla Romana style ???? I would not do anything even remotely complex for this kind of dish, unless of course you want to mask the taste of veal. My choice would be a fresh Montelpuciano d'Abruzzo.

I'd skip cheeses too and instead of spinach and basil used sage. The dish is about veal. It's an expensive and delicate ingredient that needs just a touch of flavoring which comes from prosciutto.
quote:
For alla Romana style ???? I would not do anything even remotely complex for this kind of dish, unless of course you want to mask the taste of veal.


Grun, Complex??? I have paired Brunello and Barolo dozens of times with this veal mix - more Brunello (a few friends out to dinner just last night in fact). It's wonderful. Your choice of wine is fine as well. There are many different ways to go (not just Italy either)

This is NOT a complex Veal dish at all. Fontina Cheese, Prosc. cheese, spinich. It's a basic stuffed Veal Chop. Brunello is not an overly complex wine to begin with and would certainly not over power this at all. Barolo has a little more "going on" - I'd still do it, but it's a bigger wine. BdM is perfect though IMO.
I don't see the need to pair Italian wine with Italian food unless you feel better about choosing a wine from the same region as the recipe. It actually makes little sense otherwise. I try to choose the best wine for the pairing regardless of its origin.

My choice would be an aged CdP or a Riesling.
quote:
I don't see the need to pair Italian wine with Italian food unless you feel better about choosing a wine from the same region as the recipe.


I agree with that too. I just posted what I look for. There are few meals I like better with my higher end Italians than good hearty Veal dishes.
quote:
My choice would be an aged CdP or a Riesling.



Forgive my ignorance but CdP is Cotes du ______?

What kind of Reisling? Dry (French, Australian) Or Sweet (German, U.S.)?

The Germans do a better job on the sweet Reisling than the U.S. does right?
I think Riesling would be an exteremly poor match for this dish.

Also, I should have read the initial post a little better. The dish isn't actually Saltimboca alla Romano. Saltimbocca uses veal scallopine with prosciutto and a sage leave pinned to it w/ a toothpick. Sear both sides, remove the veal, then deglaze with a little red wine. Add some veal stock (or beef stock if you don't have it), reduce, then set the sauce with unsalted butter. Add the veal back to the sauce, let everything come together, and serve.
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:

Also, I should have read the initial post a little better. The dish isn't actually Saltimboca alla Romano. Saltimbocca uses veal scallopine with prosciutto and a sage leave pinned to it w/ a toothpick. Sear both sides, remove the veal, then deglaze with a little red wine. Add some veal stock (or beef stock if you don't have it), reduce, then set the sauce with unsalted butter. Add the veal back to the sauce, let everything come together, and serve.


That is what it said on the menu.
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
The dish isn't actually Saltimboca alla Romano.

quote:
Originally posted by spo1977:
That is what it said on the menu.

If you spend a few minutes researching recipes, you'll find a few that fit the dish that Spo1977 had. The area the recipe comes from is large enough to include numerous tweeks and/or perks.
I can't add much to what's already been said... except to throw my vote to a native Italian varietal. If Brunello is too expensive, I'd go with another good Tuscan (Chianti Classico, Vino Nobile, or Montpulciano d'Abruzzo). And as for the Barolo at Trader Joes... here. Smile

I'll also add, this is one of my favorite dishes.
If $14 is the range, go with a chianti or Palazzo Della Torre. It is a very available, a 90 pointer versatile wine that goes with almost anything and will be considerably better than a cheap Barolo - which I wouldn't buy.

A $14 Barolo is the equivalent of a $10 champagne. Long odds at best.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×