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Chile, I'll second PH's recos of the 2000 Casanova de Neri Tenuta Nuova and the 99 Poggio Antico, Altero. Both are modern styled Brunellos that should fit your flavour profile. If they don't, give up on Italian wines and leave them for the rest of us. I do not recommend the 2000 Banfi, other vintages (1997, 1999 & 2001) maybe, but not 2000.

PH, you're wasting your breath and fingertip skin on BO.
For anyone that wants to try a '99 Brunello, I'd say give them another 10 years. I STILL have not opened a '99 that I could choke down....and I like Brunello. Give them some time to settle down. Try a '98 instead, if you can't find anything older. Most of the '98s that I have had are drinking very well, especially the Ciacci.

I could see someone new to Italian wine opening a '99 Brunello and never giving their wine another chance.
Not all Brunellos are a brick house. I love Italians, especially BdM`s and Super Tuscans, and have had the `99 Col D`Orcia BdM a few times. Though not one of the stronger Brunellos, it is still very enjoyable with a meal IMO, with just an hour or two splash decanted. Outside of this one example I certainly agree MOST are a few years aways from their window though 10 years may be a bit extreme.
quote:
Originally posted by Foghorn:
For anyone that wants to try a '99 Brunello, I'd say give them another 10 years. I STILL have not opened a '99 that I could choke down....and I like Brunello. Give them some time to settle down. Try a '98 instead, if you can't find anything older. Most of the '98s that I have had are drinking very well, especially the Ciacci.

I could see someone new to Italian wine opening a '99 Brunello and never giving their wine another chance.


A '99 Campogiovanni that I had over the summer was really good. I wouldn't say "ready" but I didn't need to "choke it down."

My note:

  • 1999 Campogiovanni (San Felice) Brunello di Montalcino - Italy, Tuscany, Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino (6/8/2007)
    Medium-dark ruby colour. Not decanted, opened for 3 hours and poured into shoulder. Initially very restrained on the nose. Aromas of red fruit, earth, and herbs. Medium-full bodied, again initially restrained with firm tannins and good structure/acidity. Short finish, ~25s. With time, the nose turns dark fruit and shows hints of smoke following through to an expanded palate of black licorice, black cherry, blackberry, coffee and hints of peach. This is a well made wine with excellent potential. It needs a minimum of another three years in the cellar, likely more. 91+ points. (91 pts.)

Posted from CellarTracker

It was consumed over three hours and continued to improve in the glass.
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
A '99 Campogiovanni that I had over the summer was really good. I wouldn't say "ready" but I didn't need to "choke it down."


I have tried three different bottles of the '99 Campogiovanni since release. One at release, another later on (can't remember when), and another just a few weeks ago (to see if there was any improvement). All three have been chokers.....I'm talking face contortions, eye squinting, spit it out, kind of choking it down. All the '99s I have tried have been like that. I'm not touching another '99 for years.
quote:
Originally posted by Foghorn:
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
A '99 Campogiovanni that I had over the summer was really good. I wouldn't say "ready" but I didn't need to "choke it down."


I have tried three different bottles of the '99 Campogiovanni since release. One at release, another later on (can't remember when), and another just a few weeks ago (to see if there was any improvement). All three have been chokers.....I'm talking face contortions, eye squinting, spit it out, kind of choking it down. All the '99s I have tried have been like that. I'm not touching another '99 for years.


Maybe I've got a magic cellar then! Much more approachable than some of the other '99s that I've had at various events/tastings.

Almost everything that I have will see significantly more cellaring.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I'm getting a craving for pizza!


That's the spirit! Italian wines are often excellent food wines. Some Italian wines go wonderfully with food, but are virtually undrinkable without food. The acidity that is sometimes unbearable without food works like a charm with food. Which is not to say that Italian wines are "pizza wines."

Do you want to drink a 30-year-old Burgundy with pasta and meat sauce? Probably not.
quote:
Originally posted by Spenser:
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Originally posted by Board-O:
I'm getting a craving for pizza!


That's the spirit! Italian wines are often excellent food wines. Some Italian wines go wonderfully with food, but are virtually undrinkable without food. The acidity that is sometimes unbearable without food works like a charm with food. Which is not to say that Italian wines are "pizza wines."

Do you want to drink a 30-year-old Burgundy with pasta and meat sauce? Probably not.


I guess it depends on your taste buds. I have been able to enjoy many Barolo and Barberescos with something as simple as, smoked almonds. Then as the Italian wine has more time in the decanter, found it exceptional on it's own. I know the Italians have spent years putting food and wine together but in the end it is that craftmanship and sophistication of balancing their grape and spice that stands out for me. IMHO. Smile I would love to have you over to sample a Barbaresco or a Sperrs from Angelo Gaja to show you what I mean.
I have avoided this foolish thread up to now, but just couldn't resist anymore. The best was this quote which bumped it back to life.
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Italian wine is amazingly overated. Aside from some Chiantis, most italian wine make me think it must have gone bad!
Now let me get this straight. The one wine which has the worst rep for being thin and overly acidic you have enjoyed, but nothing else? What the hell was he drinking? On that the other topic I can't agree with Suckling's advice of the Avignonesi. It is a very nice wine, (I've had 4 or 5 bottles in the last couple of months) and Vino Nobiles are generally softer and less acidic then Chiantis. However, I don't believe that somebody who likes "cocktail" wines would appreciate it. Peter Tofinetti's choice of the Tua Rita Perlato Del Bosco seems like a much more likely to be understood wine. If somebody doesn't like pure Sangiovese, you will never be able to force them to. Just like I am never going to be enamored with Aussie Shiraz.
quote:
Originally posted by vinoman7:
Foghorn,

I haven't had the '99 yet but the '97 Campogiovanni you sold was incredible. There was no doubt it was one of the best Brunellos I have had. I drank it this past May.


Yep, the '97 has been one of my "go to" Brunello's since it was released. It was singing at release, and I don't think ever went into any kind of closed down phase. I only have a few left, so I haven't opened one in some time. I'm waiting awhile longer to break into the bulk of the '97s.
I am a complete Italian newbie. I have little experience with the wines, but what little I have tried, I have not enjoyed. I have seen a lot of recommended wines here and I will look for them. I was also hoping if someone can tell me how Super Tuscans fit into the Italian equation. Are they very acidic? Are they more modern? Just curious if someone can give me a little info on the wines and recommend a couple. Thanks in advance.
quote:
Originally posted by Keeno:
I am a complete Italian newbie. I have little experience with the wines, but what little I have tried, I have not enjoyed. I have seen a lot of recommended wines here and I will look for them. I was also hoping if someone can tell me how Super Tuscans fit into the Italian equation...


Basically, Super Tuscans include bordeaux grapes (ie. cabernet, merlot) in their blend. Sometimes 100%; others blended with sangiovese.

Playing the devil's advocate, they were introduced as a response to the claims that Italian wines were too thin and acidic. Lots has been written about how super Tuscans came about. Do a search on Sassicaia.

quote:
Originally posted by Keeno:
Are they very acidic? Are they more modern?


In contrast to a lot of Italians, I don't find super Tuscans very acidic. I think of them as more international in style not modern.

quote:
Originally posted by Keeno:
Just curious if someone can give me a little info on the wines and recommend a couple. Thanks in advance.


Depending on where you live, Keeno, you should be able to find Sassicaia, Ornellaia, Tignanello, Flaccianello, etc. As you probably know, super Tuscans can be very expensive.
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Originally posted by Markiemark:
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quote:
I love the allegrini amarone, but I would not send an italian wine virgin strait into amarone.

Where would you send them? Most people who don't like Italian wines don't like the acidity.

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I don't know anyone who doesn't love a good Amarone -- whether or not they tend to like other Italians.


I use the Zenato Ripassa (baby Amarone) to break in the Italian virgins. Smile


Agree, Zenato Ripassa is a great wine to break in the Italian wine virgins.
Geez! Don't know how I missed this thread way back when... I've had very good luck with Barolo, Barbaresco, Brunello, Nebbiolo Langhe, Super Tuscans, Amarone and interestingly, Aglianico. The thing is, though, you have to age them. Aside from Aglianico and maybe Langhe, the minimum drinking threshold on all of these types is a decade. I've read that Barolo will improve for 20 years and drink well for 30. The longer the requisite aging window, the more important it is to purchase upon release and maintain your own provenance. All of the bad things that can happen to wine have a higher probability of occurrence the longer it's been outside of your control. It's necessary to cellar yourself in order to maximize enjoyment of Italians. That said... a properly aged Barolo is transcendent. I've also had some memorable 10 year old Brunello.
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Originally posted by Longboarder:
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Originally posted by KSC02:
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Originally posted by RedMeat:
I've also had some memorable 10 year old Brunello.

A couple months back Longboarder brought a '55 BdM to Dinner.

Spectacular Cool


KSCO2 - Gkapoor brought the '55 BdM and I brought the '55Bdx. I brought a '75 Castelgiocondo the second night. I agree the '55 BdM was spectacular.

Damn! That's right. My sincere apologies for not crediting you correctly, G. I recall the whole saga now. I hate when that happens! Red Face

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