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I'm pretty sure lots of people here drink diverse wines regularly, but don't we all have our favorites that stick around for months or years (or longer) and bought a lot of it still in our cellars? I was looking at my wines and noticed how it's changed over time. I have a small cellar of about 100 wines now and admit it's mostly all at a higher price point. More affordable daily drinkers stay at home with minimal temp control (dark cool closet).

  1.  California Napa cabs and cab blends, and this lasted easily the longest (I think lots of people start here(?))
  2. Domestic Pinot (rarely if ever buy this for my cellar anymore, but this was 2nd longest to Pinot)
  3. Grenache dominate CdP  (Champagne around this time as well but it's a tiny % of my wines).
  4. Domestic grenache. I still buy regularly.
  5. Lately I've been buying and drinking more domestic Syrah, and (French) Hermitage is turning into my absolute favorite along with Cote-Rotie.

    On my list to explore are more aged Bordeaux (though the price point might be out on this one), German Riesling. My experience with Italian and Spanish wine is limited and hasn't yet made the list of something to cellar.
Original Post

I started with boones and other flavored wine coolerd and white zins or jug wines back in tday.  From there went more seriously to napa cabs and ports.  My tastes have ventured to aussie shiraz, Oregon pinots, bdx, CDP, northern rhones, lots of German and Austrian whites, jumilla, Merlot heavier wines, Provence, rioja back to northern rhones in that order.  Dabbling occasionally in burgundy and a few italians here and there.

As I passed almost two decades of drinking wine, I think my journey has taken me back to really three regions that still intrigue me.

A well stored and aged Bordeaux.  There is nothing that can have the complexity, the evolution in a glass that I find great Bordeaux as achieving.

A properly aged port.  Similar to Bordeaux but even more impressive when you open that hundred year old btl that gives you hints of history in a bottle.  It was made in a different era!

Well aged rioja.  Nothing says classic, lithe like a good old rioja.  Fields of strawberries, some showing a little jamminess but impossiboy smooth and incredibly floral, a well aged rioja is one of the best food pairing wines I've found.

I've been fortunate recently to try one or two older 60s barolos and I'm starting to see the love there but alas the price is not conducive for drinking too much of that.

Ditto on the burgs, I've definitely had a wow burg that made me see what people are talking about but until I hit the lotto, probably not worth blowing a small fortune on it.

Last edited by g-man

Good thread.  I started, like g-man, with wine that really wasn't wine.

The first varietal that actually caught my attention was Zinfandel.  Flame on, biatches!   It was a fruity but tannic red wine that went well with BBQ, burnt meat and that was approachable for me as a "cocktail, " drink-by-itself wine.  

Now... my focus is on great older Italians, Bordeaux and high quality Champagne.  Great Spanish wines are an occasional pleasure.  Burgundy?  Still an expensive minefield for me.  I'll drink yours if you're opening it though!!    Especially if it's something you've already tried and can recommend.

PH

Last edited by purplehaze

To what I think was the OP question, early on when I started buying wine in earnest my two great loves were CDP and German Riesling.  I bought heavily enough that I had to largely shut down purchases from those regions, which makes me a little more sad about Germany as I love the young version of these wines almost as much as their second stage.

I think the change over time is a continual process with most of us having varied enough tastes that percentages and areas of focus for purchases will be ever varying.

sd-wineaux posted:

To what I think was the OP question, early on when I started buying wine in earnest my two great loves were CDP and German Riesling.  I bought heavily enough that I had to largely shut down purchases from those regions, which makes me a little more sad about Germany as I love the young version of these wines almost as much as their second stage.

I think the change over time is a continual process with most of us having varied enough tastes that percentages and areas of focus for purchases will be ever varying.

heh, i took it to mean, as you're learning but if you've drunk enough, what would you stock in your cellar.

My purchases now are super consistent in terms of what goes into the cellar, vs the random pick ups for offlines.

purplehaze posted:

Good thread.  I started, like g-man, with wine that really wasn't wine.

The first varietal that actually caught my attention was Zinfandel.  Flame on, biatches!   It was a fruity but tannic red wine that went well with BBQ, burnt meat and that was approachable for me as a "cocktail, " drink-by-itself wine.  

Now... my focus is on great older Italians, Bordeaux and high quality Champagne.  Great Spanish wines are an occasional pleasure.  Burgundy?  Still an expensive minefield for me.  I'll drink yours if you're opening it though!!    Especially if it's something you've already tried and can recommend.

PH

This sounds like me! From swill to Zin to mostly Bordeaux, with Rhône taking the place of Italy.

Nothing like a 20-30 year old Bordeaux for complexity. So that’s what I have most of in the cellar, with bottles coming into maturity every year.

I tend to drink Napa cabs and CdP at 5-15 years, so don’t need as many of those in the cellar.

Due to where i lived i started with Chileans, argentinian malbecs and mediocre Riojas. Trips to France led me to inexpensive bordeaux (more St emilion) as i did not have the disposable income. 

Moved to the states for work and started buying mostly domestic pinot and california cabs. Started travelling more and i am learning to appreciate old world italians (tuscan), top of line riojas, and top bordeaux thanks to the generosity of forumites.

Still drink tons of domestic pinot given versatility to pair and also enjoy quality napa cabs.

Whats is next; not much i have lots to learn still.

 

My parents didn't drink wine so I wasn't really introduced to it until I started working after college.  First experience was with Napa Cabs at work dinners.  I didn't care for them so I just thought I didn't like wine in general.  A couple of years later I tried my first aged Bordeaux and that wine really hit me.   That was right around the time I got really interested in cooking and exploring different kinds of food so wine was a natural compliment.   

- First few years was mainly focused on Bordeaux so I was reading anything and everything on the subject and 90% of my purchases were Bordeaux 

- Next came Brunello and Super Tuscans which was an easy transition from Bordeaux

- Right before and during my time in London is when I really expanded my interest in Champagne, Loire, White Burgundy, Northern and Sothern Rhone, Germany, Piedmont and Rioja. 

          - London was a master class in wine.  I met so many generous people that would pull amazing wines from their cellar to share.  The wine shops were great and you could consistently find wine with age.  Also there were endless off lines to chose from on anything from high end classic wines to more affordable interesting wines.  The bonus was its so easy to travel from there.  During that time we took 3 trips to Brunello, 1 to Bordeaux, 2 to the Rhone, 1 to Rioja and 1 to the Loire.  

Moved back to CA and didn't have 1 wine from CA in my cellar at that point and wasn't really interested in it.  A somm in NY recommended a pinot from Littorai that changed my mind.  That started a fun little journey through my home state finding producers making wines that were more my style. 

Last few years has been more focused on Red Burg.  I've always enjoyed it but something really clicked a few years ago and I now own more burg than anything else.  Wish I had started earlier on that one. 

Currently I really like the mix in my cellar which has a pretty diverse mix of regions and ages.  Don't buy as much as I used to but when I do it's mainly back filing Burg, N. Rhone and Piedmont.  I don't really follow wine the way I used to.  I don't read as much about new vintages, scores, etc.  More interested in learning about new producers from friends, retail relationships I've developed and trying new wines from restaurants with interesting lists.  Don't really offline as much anymore with young kids, busy job, etc.  But still love cooking and pairing wines at home.  I'm lucky in that my wife shares the same interest.  

That was my timeline.  And while I have started liking some regions more than others, my preferences or tastes really haven't changed.  There is not a region that I spent time on in the past that I don't like now.   The style of wine has always stayed the same.  I have pretty much always avoided bigger, fruity, darker wines no mater where they are from. 

 

g-man that's a good thread you linked to. Forgot about that one.

Looking back, we're drinking a lot more white wine than ever, but that's kind of because my wife has acquired a taste for it that she didn't have before.

Other than that, the only thing that's changed about our drinking over the last 9 years since that other thread is that we'll actually buy and even drink Pinot Noir once in a while now.

As rosé.

Best use for the grape.

Last edited by gregt

I started with Italian, as a consequence of working for a law firm where every day at around 5 PM we'd get together to review matters of the day, and Italian wine was served.  Then, on to Burgundy, as the boss was into that.  Volnay was one of the early ones.

At some point, German wines were my favorites. Then, got into California, Aussie shiraz, Bordeaux.  Then, totally stopped drinking Germans and California and Australia, and went back to France (Rhone) and Italy.  Then, stopped drinking French and went to Oregon and Washington and Chile.   Then a Spanish and Italian period.  Now, daily drinkers mostly from Washington state.  But, growing trend in Spanish and Italian again.

I am pretty erratic, I suppose.

 

julied posted:
sd-wineaux posted:
gregt posted:

Looking back, we're drinking a lot more white wine than ever

Dude, I thought that white wine didn't even count?

That is what the SD crew taught me!

Absolutely. That's why we're drinking more of it - it doesn't figure in against the bottle count so it helps us be sure we're not drinking too much!

I get interested and re-interested in all different areas from time to time. I may get tired of France or Australia but I'll be back. The smart money for me is Italy, Spain then Washington and California but I have learned not to write any regions off. I like big wines and wines just short of being austere and everything in between.

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