Most reds are usually best just under room temperature at about 65F. When they are too warm the alcohol can make them taste "hot" and they are generally less smooth. Too cool and you lose some of the fruit's lushness. Lighter reds such as Beaujolais, lighter pinots, and Dolcetto should be more like 55-60F. PS, how did you fare through Dean? Living is S. FL, I know the drill.
[QUOTE]Originally posted by vinole:
Most reds are usually best just under room temperature at about 65F. When they are too warm the alcohol can make them taste "hot" and they are generally less smooth. Too cool and you lose some of the fruit's lushness. Lighter reds such as Beaujolais, lighter pinots, and Dolcetto should be more like 55-60F. PS, how did you fare through Dean? Living is S. FL, I know the drill.[Thanks for the info - Dean was a lot of work as we were expedcting the worst a but basically we got very very lucky it stayed west after hitting Jamaica and past over 120 milesouth of her......good luck for the rest of the H season]
The best tactic is to open it straight out of the cellar or wine fridge at around 55F. Taste it and see if you like it then. It will gradually warm, of course, decide if you need to re-chill or if it is one of those wines that are best served warm. Lately I have been enjoying my reds on the warmer side, when I was first getting serious about wine I liked them at 55F.

In short, there is no one best temperature that fits every red.
Ditto.

quote:
Originally posted by spo:
The best tactic is to open it straight out of the cellar or wine fridge at around 55F. Taste it and see if you like it then. It will gradually warm, of course, decide if you need to re-chill or if it is one of those wines that are best served warm. Lately I have been enjoying my reds on the warmer side, when I was first getting serious about wine I liked them at 55F.

In short, there is no one best temperature that fits every red.
quote:
Originally posted by vinole:
Most reds are usually best just under room temperature at about 65F. When they are too warm the alcohol can make them taste "hot" and they are generally less smooth. Too cool and you lose some of the fruit's lushness. Lighter reds such as Beaujolais, lighter pinots, and Dolcetto should be more like 55-60F. PS, how did you fare through Dean? Living is S. FL, I know the drill.


Ditto.
I will also vote with starting at cellar temp, around 55 degrees F. Then you can taste the wine as it "evolves."

The way I learned it (and I may be wrong,) as the wine warms up certain esters become volatilized and the frangrance you get from the wine can change with the temperature.

Also, the temperature differential as your tonugue and mouth apparatus contact the wine shifts, so you may notice a change in "flavor" as well.

"Hand warming" is fun, too. Starting with your palms on the bowl of the wine glass and experiencing the wine as it changes from just the heat of your hands affecting it. You'll notice "closed in" wines become fruitier, etc...

I believe in serving both whites and reds at celler temp, then letting the red sit out and keeping the white in the fridge between pouring glasses/tastes.

The real bottom line, of course, is not learning which is the "correct" serving temp, but satisfying your own curiosity about this in the context of the wines you tend to favor.

By teaching yourself how you like your wine to evolve through the evening, you'll settle into a place where you have your own "tasting protocol" that is right for you.

I can't recall seeing articles about this, but I'd be interested in the way different wine reviewers consider temparature and temperature changes in thier wine experiences and descriptions!
Room temp here in Fl is just to darn warm. I mean right now it's 95f outside daily....keeping my home less than 75f is just not practical or affordable (electric bill at 76F is close to $500/month)...and IMO just to warm for reds. I decant and then sit them on ice real quick right before I am going to drink to cool it off and bring the temp to the upper 60f range....just perfect for my tastes. I do often lower the AC down to 73f at drinking time just so the glass doesn't warm up so fast. Price I guess we Floridians have to pay Wink
Baja, your reply reminds me of a tasting that I went to a couple of years ago. It was put on by a retailer that I didn't know very well. It was one of those wonderful 100 degree days. We had arrived a little early, but they let us go ahead and start the tasting. They had kept the whites on ice so the temperature was fine, but the reds were very warm. Trying to be helpful (since we were early), I suggested that they might want to cool off the reds a little. Their reply was that they served their reds at room temperature.
quote:
Originally posted by Winetech:
Baja, your reply reminds me of a tasting that I went to a couple of years ago. It was put on by a retailer that I didn't know very well. It was one of those wonderful 100 degree days. We had arrived a little early, but they let us go ahead and start the tasting. They had kept the whites on ice so the temperature was fine, but the reds were very warm. Trying to be helpful (since we were early), I suggested that they might want to cool off the reds a little. Their reply was that they served their reds at room temperature.


Doesn't that just kill you "room temperature". I went to Italy last summer....it was above 90F every day and room temp there is about 80F....that's if the restaurant your at is lucky enough to have air conditioning. I was dropping bottles of red into ice buckets every where I went....you had to see the looks on their faces...PRICELESS Eek
quote:
Originally posted by baja:
quote:
Originally posted by Winetech:
Baja, your reply reminds me of a tasting that I went to a couple of years ago. It was put on by a retailer that I didn't know very well. It was one of those wonderful 100 degree days. We had arrived a little early, but they let us go ahead and start the tasting. They had kept the whites on ice so the temperature was fine, but the reds were very warm. Trying to be helpful (since we were early), I suggested that they might want to cool off the reds a little. Their reply was that they served their reds at room temperature.


Doesn't that just kill you "room temperature". I went to Italy last summer....it was above 90F every day and room temp there is about 80F....that's if the restaurant your at is lucky enough to have air conditioning. I was dropping bottles of red into ice buckets every where I went....you had to see the looks on their faces...PRICELESS Eek

Recently in a restaurant along the Gulf Coast in Texas, I ordered a good wine by the glass. It was served what I think must have been "kitchen room temperature". The server was a bit puzzled when I asked her to bring me one or two ice cubes. She did and one did the trick...I enjoyed the wine once the ice cube had melted.
I agree, but it boils down to the person. I don't argue with folks, it's their glass of wine.
quote:
Originally posted by vinole:
Most reds are usually best just under room temperature at about 65F. When they are too warm the alcohol can make them taste "hot" and they are generally less smooth. Too cool and you lose some of the fruit's lushness. Lighter reds such as Beaujolais, lighter pinots, and Dolcetto should be more like 55-60F. PS, how did you fare through Dean? Living is S. FL, I know the drill.
quote:
Originally posted by EagleGrafix:
Recently in a restaurant along the Gulf Coast in Texas, I ordered a good wine by the glass. It was served what I think must have been "kitchen room temperature". The server was a bit puzzled when I asked her to bring me one or two ice cubes. She did and one did the trick...I enjoyed the wine once the ice cube had melted.


Is there a reason you didn't ask to have the glass put in the fridge for 10 minutes or so? I think this would have been a significantly better alternative than putting an ice cube in your glass of "good wine."

I imagine the time it took the ice cube to melt (and dilute your glass of wine) was equivalent to the time it would have taken for it to drop several degrees in the fridge.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
This is a good discussion for a different thread IMO PurpleHaze.

1. Have you ever put a cube of ice in your wine to chill it?

2. Can you honestly say to yourself it significantly impacted the wine you were tasting?

Do you want to start the thread or me?


Go ahead and kick it off. It's probably worth a conversation.

I've put ice cubes in sangria, but never in a glass of good wine. At least not in recent memory. Kind of like putting my wine in a microwave, it just seems wrong.

I just took 2 ice cubes made in my fridge's icemaker and melted them. The water produced came to exactly 1.5 ounces of water.

I cannot imagine this much water, or even half the amount not having a significant affect on the taste of a 4-6 ounce pour of wine.

Post away!! Cool

PH
quote:
Originally posted by EagleGrafix:


Recently in a restaurant along the Gulf Coast in Texas, I ordered a good wine by the glass. It was served what I think must have been "kitchen room temperature". The server was a bit puzzled when I asked her to bring me one or two ice cubes. She did and one did the trick...I enjoyed the wine once the ice cube had melted.[/QUOTE]

You are not serious... Confused
quote:
Originally posted by EagleGrafix:
Recently in a restaurant along the Gulf Coast in Texas, I ordered a good wine by the glass. It was served what I think must have been "kitchen room temperature". The server was a bit puzzled when I asked her to bring me one or two ice cubes. She did and one did the trick...I enjoyed the wine once the ice cube had melted.


I have used ice cubes to cool an overly warm wine (I prefer 65 degrees, but I can deal with up to 70 degrees). I usually only needed to let half of one cube melt and it's much faster than putting your glass in the freezer, which is also hard to gauge correctly in that the glass gets and stays cooler more rapidly than the wine itself. I have also never done this with any really special wines, but if I have to choose between a slightly diluted wine and a 75% wine - if you're talking a high alcohol pinot or zin, this can border on undrinkable - I'll take a the melted half ice cube. It can be very helpful at summer weddings.
I totally agree! You are the customer and we are always right. Send the warn wine back!
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I can't believe this. If the bottle hasn't been opened, chill it a little. If you're in a restaurant and they serve you a warm glass of wine, send it back. Ice cubes in the wine? Never
Settle down folks, you are reading too much and assuming too much.

Did I put the ice cube inside the wine glass and into the wine? No.

Send it back? Why? You assume that there was a a bottle of this wine at the proper temperature somewhere where the warm once came fron?

I suppose I could have sent it back and gone without wine but I did not want to. I guess I have a bit to go to earn my wine snob merit badge.

I was dining alone and so I figured I'd do a bit of my own wine glass chilling experiement.
It worked and...

...I enjoyed the wine with my meal. Now, Please, tell me what else matters?
quote:
Originally posted by EagleGrafix:
Did I put the ice cube inside the wine glass and into the wine? No.


"Recently in a restaurant along the Gulf Coast in Texas, I ordered a good wine by the glass. It was served what I think must have been "kitchen room temperature". The server was a bit puzzled when I asked her to bring me one or two ice cubes. She did and one did the trick...I enjoyed the wine once the ice cube had melted."

Sure sounds like it. I supposed you want us to believe you rubbed the outside of the glass with the ice? Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by EagleGrafix:
Did I put the ice cube inside the wine glass and into the wine? No.


"Recently in a restaurant along the Gulf Coast in Texas, I ordered a good wine by the glass. It was served what I think must have been "kitchen room temperature". The server was a bit puzzled when I asked her to bring me one or two ice cubes. She did and one did the trick...I enjoyed the wine once the ice cube had melted."

Sure sounds like it. I supposed you want us to believe you rubbed the outside of the glass with the ice? Big Grin

I don't care what you believe about this. And I won't bother explaining any more since you are taking this much too seriously.

Since you make your perception and understanding the judge of what is true about this then I'll let you live with your own conclusions and I still enjoy my life.
OK. I'll believe what you tell me. What did you do with the ice? If you cooled the wine with it but didn't put it in the glass, I assume you rubbed the melting ice cube on the glass. Is that a correct assumption? If you did do that, wasn't it a mess with the water running down yoyr wrist onto the table? I'm also guessing the heat from your hand melted the ice before it could do much cooling, but I guess one did the trick. Maybe I'm just not getting the correct picture.
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by EagleGrafix:
Recently in a restaurant along the Gulf Coast in Texas, I ordered a good wine by the glass. It was served what I think must have been "kitchen room temperature". The server was a bit puzzled when I asked her to bring me one or two ice cubes. She did and one did the trick...I enjoyed the wine once the ice cube had melted.


Is there a reason you didn't ask to have the glass put in the fridge for 10 minutes or so? I think this would have been a significantly better alternative than putting an ice cube in your glass of "good wine."

I imagine the time it took the ice cube to melt (and dilute your glass of wine) was equivalent to the time it would have taken for it to drop several degrees in the fridge.

PH

This is a good question PH and if I ever find myself in that situation again, I will use your suggestion.

quote:
OK. I'll believe what you tell me. What did you do with the ice? If you cooled the wine with it but didn't put it in the glass, I assume you rubbed the melting ice cube on the glass. Is that a correct assumption? If you did do that, wasn't it a mess with the water running down yoyr wrist onto the table? I'm also guessing the heat from your hand melted the ice before it could do much cooling, but I guess one did the trick. Maybe I'm just not getting the correct picture.


What I did was an experiment of sorts. The server brought me a glass with several good sized ice cubes. I put one in the napkin and held it against the glass and slowly turned the glass until the ice cube was gone. at that time it had lowered the temperature of the wine enough to enjoy. Having my result I continued my meal.

The whole point of my post was to relay what was a comical situation which I handled in an unorthodox way. Truth be told if I knew it would have hyjacked this tread I would kept it to my self.
Didn't Harvey Steinman do a video about this subject (being served a glass of wine that is too warm)? If I recall he put a couple of ice cubes in his glass, did a quick swirl and removed the ice cubes so it would not dilute the wine....too much.

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