quote:
Originally posted by cluricaunwines:
Would this be a post modern plum post?

Haggis- I have no idea.

Eek


Yes, that's right!... hysterical!


Spenser: tasting like "modern plum" vs. "a modern style with plum flavors" seem like two different things to me. "Modern" is modifying plum. Maybe you're right, and it's just bad syntax... or is that sin tax? Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by haggis:


Spenser: tasting like "modern plum" vs. "a modern style with plum flavors" seem like two different things to me. "Modern" is modifying plum. Maybe you're right, and it's just bad syntax... or is that sin tax? Roll Eyes


Perhaps they meant "pure, modern, plum." What a difference a comma makes!
After having tasted this wine myself, I must disagree. The plum flavors are clearly 18th century Russian plums, while the chocolate flavors are more akin to Nestle rather than Valrhona. Better luck next time WS Wink

If you want to make God laugh, tell him your future plans. -Woody Allen
Excerpted from an article by Sam Gugino...

quote:

A member of the rose family, the plum is related to the peach and the nectarine, all of which are stone fruit or botanically speaking, drupes, that is, fruit with soft flesh surrounding a seed and covered with skin. The plum’s genealogy can be traced along two lines. The common European plum such as the blue plum or the prune plum (and including the Damson plum named for the city of Damascus) can be traced to the Caucasus region between the Caspian and Black Seas before the time of Christ. These plums then spread to the Mediterranean and the rest of Europe.

The Japanese plum had its origins in China, also more than 2000 years ago. The Chinese considered the wild plum a delicacy, but this Asian plum did not fully develop until it found a home in Japan some 300 years ago. In the 19th century, when the Japanese began immigrating to the United States and settling in California, they brought their plums with them.

There are also native American plums, none of which are significant commercially. Perhaps the most familiar one is the sloe which goes into the production of sloe gin, a distilled spirit popular in the 50s and early 60s, especially for coming-of-age drinkers. A small beach or maritime plum may also be found occasionally in the fall.

Luther Burbank, the famous American plant breeder, purchased some plum trees in Japan in the late 1800s. As a result of experiments he performed near his home in Santa Rosa, California, a number of modern plum varieties were developed, most notably the Santa Rosa plum. Today, over 200 varieties of plums are raised in California.
(emphasis added)

Link to full text

Once ... in the wilds of Afghanistan, I lost my corkscrew, and we were forced to live on nothing but food and water for days. - W. C. Fields
quote:
Originally posted by cometspider:
Which still leads to the question, "How does modern plum flavor differ from regular plum flavor?" Are moderm plums more ripe, fleshy, etc?


I'm guessing you've hit the nail on the head. Of the "old world" plums, I am only familiar with Damson which are small, firm, and quite tart - they make excellent jam, but are suitable for little else (birds won't even take more than a test nibble). Compare that to a Santa Rosa Plum, or a modern day black plum - these are fleshy, juicy, soft, and sweet.

Once ... in the wilds of Afghanistan, I lost my corkscrew, and we were forced to live on nothing but food and water for days. - W. C. Fields

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