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kca; Good question. I spoke with one of the State Legs at a party over the holidays on this issue. He laughed. As you know right now the fight is over dropping 3.2 beer and allowing the supemarkets to sell regular beer. That is going to be a bruiser for both sides.

Here is part of the problem. Under current rules the Legislators are only allowed to carry 5 bills per year. So someone, with money would have to convince a Leg to carry this as one of his bills. It will have to go through Appropriations for financial impact. If it has a price tag(it will), do you think anyone in the Leg would support it anytime in the near future? If retail is charging X for the bottle and restaurants typically charge 3X for the bottle, the State and muni is losing the differnce in sales tax. No one in the industry is going to support it, so it will have to be done as a purely consumer bill.

Great idea, wrong period of time!
I agree that it was poor wine service for the waitress to pour the entire bottle out on the first serve.

Did this impact your decision to buy a second bottle?

In bobbyc's case, it appears that the server deliberately filled up the other four glasses and gave a short pour to bobbyc in order to sell a second bottle. In this case, it doesn't appear to be as blatant. You could chalk it up to poor training.

What I am curious about is whether you think that you might not have ordered that second bottle, but for the server's actions.

I have been at some restaurants where I notice some aggressive bottle pouring before the main course is served. I suspect they do that in order for you to run out of wine as you begin the main course, thereby resulting in the purchase of a second bottle. If you run out of wine when everyone is finishing their meal, you are less likely to go ahead and spring for another bottle.
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
I find the best way to avoid wine service disappointments is as W+A and Sandy say, take charge of the situation and be clear and direct in your expectations.

This is a fairly common one, and I've just gotten into the habit of always telling the server exactly what size pour I'd like.


I watch as the server makes the first pour and signal them to stop pouring early. Sometimes I'll politely tell them we prefer to pour the wine ourselves.
Rothko, we were going to order another bottle anyway so it really didnt affect us. Like I said, I really dont think the girl knew any better. She probably thinks that is how she pours wines by the glass so wine by the botte should be the same. What was worse than the big pour was the 45 minutes it took for our hummus appatizer to get out to us.

I also see waiters give heavy pours right before the meal comes and offer another bottle. We ussally decide by how much we want to spend that night. If we dont mind a big bill we get another bottle if we want a smaller one we go by the glass if we run out.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
I find the best way to avoid wine service disappointments is as W+A and Sandy say, take charge of the situation and be clear and direct in your expectations.

This is a fairly common one, and I've just gotten into the habit of always telling the server exactly what size pour I'd like.


I watch as the server makes the first pour and signal them to stop pouring early. Sometimes I'll politely tell them we prefer to pour the wine ourselves.


I always do this ... this has never caused a problem, and I suspect many waitstaff are relieved to be relieved of this duty.
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
Here's a question regarding the opposite end of the wine service spectrum. Do you think that a restaurant which prides itself on its wine list and wine service should automatically rinse the decanter with an appropriate wine prior to decanting the wine you ordered? I've been to a couple of wonderful restaurants where the only minor complaint of the evening was that this service was not offered and the server seemed puzzled by what I was asking.
Why would you need to rinse the decanter?


I had a lengthy discussion about this with some local wine geeks and sommeliers. It seems that the practice of rinsing out the decanter, either with a small amount of the purchased wine or an acceptably similar wine that the restaurant has open, is part of the formal education for sommeliers. The idea, I gather, is that any residual amounts of detergent or the wine previously served in the decanter, or any other off odours or flavours imparted by ambient smells from the kitchen are washed away before my wine goes into the decanter.

Anyway, just wondering. The last time I asked the waiter to do this for me, I got the most bewildered look in response, but they did it anyway.
I always tell the server I will be pouring the wines myself even if I'm ordering off the restaurant list. 95% of the time I bring my own wine anyway and always bring a wine service. However when traveling abroad I can see where it might be an insult to the restaurant staff but hey you are paying for the food and wine so you should be able to do what you wish.
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:


We should get together again soon to drink some vino. I’ll hopefully get into that Cos tasting in Feb!


Hey Glenn,

We definitely should. I don't think it should be a problem getting into the Cos tasting. It looks like a lot of people are going to drop out after the change of date.

So I'll definitely see you then. After that, we should try to arrange a night out with our better halves!

When do you head back home?
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I agree that it was poor wine service for the waitress to pour the entire bottle out on the first serve.

Did this impact your decision to buy a second bottle?

In bobbyc's case, it appears that the server deliberately filled up the other four glasses and gave a short pour to bobbyc in order to sell a second bottle. In this case, it doesn't appear to be as blatant. You could chalk it up to poor training.

What I am curious about is whether you think that you might not have ordered that second bottle, but for the server's actions.

I have been at some restaurants where I notice some aggressive bottle pouring before the main course is served. I suspect they do that in order for you to run out of wine as you begin the main course, thereby resulting in the purchase of a second bottle. If you run out of wine when everyone is finishing their meal, you are less likely to go ahead and spring for another bottle.


The white was to accompany our starters. We were going to move onto reds after a glass or so of white. So no.

If we run out of wine towards the end of our main course, I generally try to get a feel for what everyone wants to do. If we want another bottle, I will normally chose a different bottle. I almost never order the same bottle twice. It is nice to try as many different wines as possible! Smile

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