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On friday night my and I went out with another couple to the Oakwood Grill in Palm Beach Gardens. They are are a wine friendly restaraunt and have a pretty good wine list. We ordered a bottle of Nickel & Nickel Syrah for about $80. We were sitting at the bar and after trying it I told the bartender to pour it and I looked away to continue my conversation. When I looked at our glasses I saw that she had poured the entire bottle in one serving. Dont get me wrong, I like a big pour when ordering by the glass. However, when I buy the whole bottle I like small pours to allow the wine to open up in the glass as I swirl it. I am not a confrontational person and didnt say anything to her or the manager. I dont blame her, I blame the restaraunt for poor wine training. When we ordered our second bottle I told her we werent ready to start it and to open it and leave it so I could pour it myself. I know that the service wont change unless someone brings it up but I hate to be a pain in the butt. Should I have said something or did I handle it correctly? I am interested in everyone opinion.
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I take a very simple approach to service issues. You are the customer/client. You have the right to respectfully inform the waiter of your wishes if they are within reason, always.

I would have simply told the waiter of my request, ask if we could perhaps pour all of the glasses in a decanter, then pour again at levels you are happy with.

There are certain times when you just know you might need to pay a little more attention to the wine service, and other times you expect the server to be well versed.

I would have tried to inform of my wishes without bringing undue attention to her, unless required. Smile
quote:
my and I . . . ordered a bottle of Nickel & Nickel


And then you ordered a second bottle. Seems like a lot of duplication that night.

Anyhow - she poured the entire bottle at once? It's weird but don't assume it was all her decision. I went to a restaurant with a friend and my wife and we ordered a bottle. Wife gets up to go to the bathroom, the other guy stands to let her out, we're in a conversation so I'm not watching the table, and the waiter comes around the side and fills all three glasses to the brim. We asked him what the hell he did that for. He says the owner wants the glasses filled like that.

Apparently people ordering by the glass complained when they got glasses partly filled. They don't get their Coke or mixed drinks like that and didn't want their wine like that. So the owner bought small glasses and fills them to the brim. And this in "wine savvy" NYC. The place does great business too.
My answer is probably not as toned down as Wiml's and W+A. It is drawn from a lot of experience.

1. ToO many establishments have "Flip that Table" as a high priority amoung its staff. Overpours is a proven and often used technique of accomplishing that goal. Never fail to consider that mgt was not dicating the pour you received! I threaded, not that long ago, about the horrible wine service I received at the Joel Palmer House, by the owner's wife, in Dayton, OR. This place knows wine and understands service, but she didn't give a sh--!

2. There are too many good restaurants around to waste one's time at one which doesn't properly train its staff, or doesn't give a sh--.. NEXT!
quote:
Originally posted by Sandy Fitzgerald:

My answer is probably not as toned down as Wiml's and W+A. It is drawn from a lot of experience.



Big Grin

Sandy, I understand. I spend well over 6 figures a year on corporate dinners, and rarely if ever darken the door of corporate or table turning restaurants. I also tend to set the tone very early on what type of service is excepted, and always reward well for holding a table for hours at a time, and request waiters by name when I reserve the table. It is rare if any detail escapes my eye, as like you, I have far more experience than I wish sometimes.

I know nothing about Oakwood Grill, and assumed we had a waiter here in need of direction. Wink

It sounds to me, we are much alike. Smile
What really annoys me is when the pour is done like that to get you to buy another bottle!

Five of us recently went out to St. John's in London and we started with a bottle of white. The waitress proceeded to pour four glasses before getting to mine, and all I got was a miniscule pour. Her first response was, "Can I bring you another bottle?"

Hell no!! If you can't pour out five glasses from a bottle, there is something wrong. I ordered a white by the glass before moving onto red. But I did give her a piece of my mind!
quote:
Originally posted by jburman82:
On friday night my and I went out with another couple to the Oakwood Grill in Palm Beach Gardens. They are are a wine friendly restaraunt and have a pretty good wine list. We ordered a bottle of Nickel & Nickel Syrah for about $80. We were sitting at the bar and after trying it I told the bartender to pour it and I looked away to continue my conversation. When I looked at our glasses I saw that she had poured the entire bottle in one serving. Dont get me wrong, I like a big pour when ordering by the glass. However, when I buy the whole bottle I like small pours to allow the wine to open up in the glass as I swirl it. I am not a confrontational person and didnt say anything to her or the manager. I dont blame her, I blame the restaraunt for poor wine training. When we ordered our second bottle I told her we werent ready to start it and to open it and leave it so I could pour it myself. I know that the service wont change unless someone brings it up but I hate to be a pain in the butt. Should I have said something or did I handle it correctly? I am interested in everyone opinion.


Please describe what she looked like or jer name.

I'll personnally pass this om to John Spoto [owner] who is a friend of ours. Willadvise his comment when received

Otherwise, I watch the server intently on the first pour just to make sure it is correct. I have been know to tell them directly their error, and let me do it from now on.
quote:
Originally posted by bobbyc:
What really annoys me is when the pour is done like that to get you to buy another bottle!

Five of us recently went out to St. John's in London and we started with a bottle of white. The waitress proceeded to pour four glasses before getting to mine, and all I got was a miniscule pour. Her first response was, "Can I bring you another bottle?"

Hell no!! If you can't pour out five glasses from a bottle, there is something wrong. I ordered a white by the glass before moving onto red. But I did give her a piece of my mind!
Hey Bobby, surprised to hear about St. John's. You would think an established place like that would have better service.

We should get together again soon to drink some vino. I’ll hopefully get into that Cos tasting in Feb!
Here's a question regarding the opposite end of the wine service spectrum. Do you think that a restaurant which prides itself on its wine list and wine service should automatically rinse the decanter with an appropriate wine prior to decanting the wine you ordered? I've been to a couple of wonderful restaurants where the only minor complaint of the evening was that this service was not offered and the server seemed puzzled by what I was asking.
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
Here's a question regarding the opposite end of the wine service spectrum. Do you think that a restaurant which prides itself on its wine list and wine service should automatically rinse the decanter with an appropriate wine prior to decanting the wine you ordered? I've been to a couple of wonderful restaurants where the only minor complaint of the evening was that this service was not offered and the server seemed puzzled by what I was asking.
Why would you need to rinse the decanter?
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by mitPradikat:
Here's a question regarding the opposite end of the wine service spectrum. Do you think that a restaurant which prides itself on its wine list and wine service should automatically rinse the decanter with an appropriate wine prior to decanting the wine you ordered? I've been to a couple of wonderful restaurants where the only minor complaint of the evening was that this service was not offered and the server seemed puzzled by what I was asking.
Why would you need to rinse the decanter?

My thoughts too. At any decent restaurant the decanter should be clean and dry.

What wine are they supposed to rinse the decanter with? My nice bottle or whatever by-the-glass crap they have that may have been open 3 days?

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