quote:
Originally posted by The Woodland Rose Garden:
My wife and I went to see Rodger Hodgson (former member of Supertramp) what an exceptional performer! All the old Supertramp hits done exactly! It was down in the finger lakes region of New York. Man, that show is going to be hard to top Wink

Cool I bought the Breakfast in America album when it first came out. It is still in regular rotation on my ipod.
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Billy Joel - last night at Fenway

Fantastic set and first grown-up concert I've been to in a while


Would have loved to see him at an outdoor venue. Had to deal with arena in Tampa back in January.

Also excited that Judas Priest will be back in Florida in October....Hollywood, I shall be!
quote:
Originally posted by The Woodland Rose Garden:
My wife and I went to see Rodger Hodgson (former member of Supertramp) what an exceptional performer! All the old Supertramp hits done exactly! It was down in the finger lakes region of New York. Man, that show is going to be hard to top Wink


I saw him 3 times in SoCal last year. If there is a more joyous performer out there I havent seen them. He just seems to be so happy to be there. Dont miss if you get a chance.
Jimmy Buffett last night - best show I can remember. This show marks thirty years with at least one show that my wife and I have attended, although many years it was more than one. We had planned to end the streak this year, but my brother surprised us with tickets the day before and we just couldn't say no. It took all of about ten seconds into the first song and I was glad we kept the streak alive.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
Jimmy Buffett last night - best show I
can remember. This show marks thirty years with at least one show that my wife and I have attended, although many years it was more than one. We had planned to end the streak this year, but my brother surprised us with tickets the day before and we just couldn't say no. It took all of about ten seconds into the first song and I was glad we kept the streak alive.

Sounds wonderful. Did he sing the lost verse? Razz
Just got back to the hotel after the July show of Billy Joel's series at MSG. Best we've ever seen him - amazing play list full of old classics you don't always hear on a broad tour, plus there's something special about playing for the home crowd. Great show!

Bill Cower was in our section at the other end of the row in front of us - dude can jam!
Friends, last night in Rouen, France (Northern France on the Seine River, about 70 miles from where it empties into the English Channel) we went to the beautiful Gothic cathedral for a music and light show. The recorded music was pretty good-- varied, quite a bit of lounge chill, some classical, some acoustic guitar, etc.-- but the light show was nothing short of amazing. Multiple projectors move images all over the highly complicated and intensely decorated facade of the twin-towered cathedral, changing its look constantly, anything from abstract design to the illusion that you're seeing a different cathedral, including Notre Dame of Paris (and a bunch of others that I'm not familiar with), a rainstorm running down the towers, Monet's water lilies floating over the building, box of Crayolas, butterflies, great variety… The saturation of colour and picture is stunning. I have never seen anything quite like it. There must be a highly complex imaging program running and coordinating the multiple projectors for this.

They do 3 shows, each app. 20 min., every evening from 11:00pm to midnight, and this runs until the end of September. I'm not sure whether or not the times change to an earlier start as the days get shorter. If any of you are in northern France in the next couple of months, or even if you're in Paris looking for an interesting side trip, I highly recommend this unique experience.

Oh, and the kicker: it's completely free, though it's a good idea to get to the square outside the cathedral a bit early for the best viewpoints.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
Friends, last night in Rouen, France (Northern France on the Seine River, about 70 miles from where it empties into the English Channel) we went to the beautiful Gothic cathedral for a music and light show. The recorded music was pretty good-- varied, quite a bit of lounge chill, some classical, some acoustic guitar, etc.-- but the light show was nothing short of amazing.


Seaquam, a similar show is projected onto Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City each night. <Here's> the YouTube clip, but it doesn't come close to replicating the live experience. The 3D visual effects, from a realistic crumbling stone facade to apparent bulges and holes appearing in the building, are astounding.
Getting ahead of myself, I know, but we have tickets for Steely Dan on August 26 at the NAC in Ottawa, a great venue acoustically. One of my all-time favourite bands - first album I ever bought as a kid was Can't Buy a Thrill. If I could have supper with any musical artists I'd probably choose Fagan and Becker, if only to try to find out what the hell some of those lyrics mean!

Can't wait!! Banana
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
Getting ahead of myself, I know, but we have tickets for Steely Dan on August 26 at the NAC in Ottawa, a great venue acoustically. One of my all-time favourite bands - first album I ever bought as a kid was Can't Buy a Thrill. If I could have supper with any musical artists I'd probably choose Fagan and Becker, if only to try to find out what the hell some of those lyrics mean!

Can't wait!! Banana


Love the Dan. I've seen them every time they've come to Toronto, but I'm passing this year. I hate the acoustics at the Molson Amphitheatre.

Best shows were at Massey Hall about 4 years ago when they did full albums: Aja one night and Royal Scam the next night. We caught both shows.
quote:
Originally posted by TPEwinedrinker:
sep 6- huey lewis & the news


Great club band, that's how I think of them Smile They were just starting to play larger venues when I first saw them at the Wooden Nickle. Eddie and the Tide was the next great club band of that genre (Greg Kihn was the predecessor).
quote:
Originally posted by Qhdeputy:
I sat by Peter Cetera on the plane yesterday. Does that count? Wink I'm headed to a huge 3 day country concert at the Gorge in E. WA. Headliners are Tim McGrew, Lady A, and Jake Owen.


I love Peter Cetera. His song from Karate Kid II was my wedding song (no joke).

The country fest sounds good. Make sure you catch Kip Moore on Friday. He's the next mega-star in country. Huge crossover appeal.
This year:

March 14 - Lodo's Bar and Grill - Keggs & Eggs
- Kongos; Unlikely Candidates; New Politics
April 3 - Boettcher Concert Hall
- Colorado Symphony - The Life of Rachmaninoff
April 4 - The Marquis
- Kongos
May 29 - Black Sheep
- Oh, Be Clever; Unlikely Candidates
July 12 - Imperial
- Blondfire; Kongos
(all front row, except Rachmaninoff)

Coming up:
August 8 - Sculley's Shooters
- Like A Storm; Dollarhide; Sick Puppies
November 6 - Ogden Theater
- The Airborne Toxic Event
November 9 - Gothic Theatre
- New Politics
quote:
Crosby and Nash sounded good, but Stephen Stills was painfully bad vocally, although he sounded great on guitar.


I saw them about 18 months ago, and the same. Crosby & Nash sang very well, but Still's voice kept cracking and going out. A real shame as he was one of the first concerts I attended, playing without CSN&Y in 1973.

Saw Gary Clark, Jr last week. Enjoyable.
Took my kid to Outside Lands.

Shockingly good sonics.

Food was good, but crazy expensive.

Winelands - meh.

Enjoyed the following...

Cello Joe

Beso Negro

Disclosure

The Kooks

Spoon

Jenny Lewis

Flaming Lips

Tom Petty

Deathcab for Cutie

Night Terrors of 1927

The Dum Dum Girls

Warpaint

Group Love

Haim

Local Natives

The Killers

Bleachers

(Did not like Kanye)
Recently:

The Offspring with Bad Religion - this really rocked. Both were in top form. "Smash" album in its entirety. Wow!

Mötley Crüe with Alice Cooper - as usual, Alice was in top form. Great to re-live my teenage years with Crüe, but even though I know they just aren't a great live band musically, they performed even worse than I had set my expectations.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by Duojet:
Steely Dan


Gonna see them here Tuesday - thoughts on the show?


Excellent Great backup band. Joe Herrington on guitar especially. My favorite album of theirs is Aja. If it's yours, you'll leave the show very happy.
quote:
Originally posted by Duojet:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by Duojet:
Steely Dan


Gonna see them here Tuesday - thoughts on the show?


Excellent Great backup band. Joe Herrington on guitar especially. My favorite album of theirs is Aja. If it's yours, you'll leave the show very happy.


Keith Carlock is a killer drummer. His drum break towards the end of Aja is worth the price of admission.

Jon Herington is also fantastic. He plays more guitar during the night than Walter Becker.

Oh hell... The whole band is ridiculously good.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
Hard to pick a favourite album but Aja would definitely be in the running. Thanks to you both for the feedback!


The Sony Centre show on Saturday was the first Toronto concert of theirs that I've missed in the past 10 years. I also caught the Donald Fagan solo show, and the Dukes of September show.

The two Massey Hall shows about 6 years ago were a highlight. That's when they were doing full albums: Aja the first night, Royal Scam the next night... plus another hour + of other material after they finished each album.

Donald's vocal range isn't quite what it used to be, but he still makes it work.

What bugs me about the Dan shows is the large percentage of the audience that only wants to hear the big hits, and they bitch (during the show, and online afterwards) that they didn't play Do It Again or Rikki, and instead played "a bunch of songs nobody has ever heard of" (referring to songs like Green Earrings or Don't Take Me Alive).

But the thing is, they DO play all the hits - EXCEPT for those two songs, which, frankly, are their least interesting compositions. (Once in a blue moon they will play one of those two songs, but it's a rare occurrence.)

I'd honestly prefer to hear them play the entire "Two Against Nature" and "Everything Must Go" albums than to hear them play Reelin' In The Years (as an example) yet again.

That's why I passed on seeing them this tour. 90% of their set list is the same every tour, and as much as I love Bodhisattva, Babylon Sisters, Reelin' In The Years, Kid Charlamagne, and the entire Aja album, I wish they could get away with playing more obscure tunes.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:

That's why I passed on seeing them this tour. 90% of their set list is the same every tour, and as much as I love Bodhisattva, Babylon Sisters, Reelin' In The Years, Kid Charlamagne, and the entire Aja album, I wish they could get away with playing more obscure tunes.


They wouldn't sell out without the hits. I'm sure no artist wants to sing/play the same set-list show after show. But the money is in the touring these days. Artists have to appeal to the hard core and the fans seeing them for the first time.It's a trade off
Caught the latest incarnation of YES twice last month. Good shows and the new singer (Jon Davison) sounds very close to Jon Anderson. Although the performances were good it just wasn't the same without Anderson there.

Also had a chance to catch Skid Row at the Mod Club in Toronto with opening acts Spin Dizzy and Psychotic Authority. Skid Row were okay...at least they had a couple of songs with which I was familiar but the opening acts weren't that great. Not bad for $25 but not great either.
East Anglia Chamber Orchestra. Venue was West Road Concert Hall. An ambitious program:

Haydn, symphony #44
Mozart, Symphonia Concertante, conductor was the soloist for Violin. Not a flawless performance, but still a treat
Beethoven, Coriolan overture
Mendelssohn, Symphony #4
At the TSO last night:

Rachmaninoff: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, with Daniil Trifonov on piano. Trifonov gave one of the best piano performances I've ever seen, at times mesmerizing, at times incredibly powerful. Tremendous expression at high speeds at times.

Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Sadly, resident conductor Peter Oundjian butchered this amazing piece of music. The instruments were laid out in an unconventional arrangement on the stage, with the result that all the voices and notes where there but the total sound was somewhat off throughout Crazy Ack . The choir had it's sections all mixed together instead of separate. The result there was that the sound was powerful when everyone sang at full volume all at once, but it always is anyway. The rest of the time, the separate voices were not as distinct. The performance was sloppy at times and unbalanced. Ack Worst performance of the 9th I've ever seen. Oundjian should have stuck to playing it the way Beethoven intended, rather than being arrogant enough to think he could improve on Beethoven. Crazy What a tool!

This guy shouldn't be in charge of a high school band, let alone a symphony orchestra.

Time for the Toronto Symphony to find a new conductor.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
VinC, what do you think about the upcoming change at NACO, with Alexander Shelley replacing Pinchas Zukerman?


Does this mean that we'll have to fly to Berlin to hear Beethoven played as Beethoven wrote and intended it, and for that matter, the rest of Baroque, Classic and Romantic period music. Well at least you can hear Baroque in Toronto from time to time.

It would be refreshing if some of these musical directors simply announced special nights for all their new wave, modernist interpretations and applications of the classics, and see if anyone will pay to listen. For regular performances, they could then focus on playing the music well with good expression. There is lots for them to work on to simply perform the music as intended, and with great expression, and mastering the nuances that make the music great. That is what separates the greats from the rest - not quirky nouveau presentations of classics. Think Horowitz.
Boz Scaggs at Massey Hall

Going in, I wasn't sure about this. Figured it could either be extreme cheese or a showcase of great musicianship.

It ended up landing somewhere inbetween. Thankfully there was no cheese, and he had a crack band, but it all felt a bit perfunctory. Highlight for me was a brilliant take on Loan Me A Dime. Highlights for the crowd were Lowdown and Lido Shuffle.
On Saturday we attended a performance of the Seattle Symphony, with a very striking soloist: a beautiful young pianist named Khatia Buniatishvili, who played Rachmaninov's Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43. She received a well-deserved standing ovation; not one of those ovations where a few people stand and then others grudgingly join them, but rather, the entire audience rose in unison as soon as the last note faded away.

I have been fortunate to have heard some great young musicians during their ascendency-- Nigel Kennedy and Nadia Solerno-Sonnenburg come to mind-- and Khatia Buniatishvili is cut from the same cloth. Her fingers move unbelievably quickly, and her passion and control are both obvious. She is a child prodigy from Georgia (not the one with Peachtree Avenue; the one in the former Soviet Union) with great credentials, awards and credits.

I believe she is currently touring North America. If she's doing a recital in your area, she is absolutely worth seeing.

And hearing, too. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Jarrett/Peacock/DeJohnette at Orchestra Hall in Chicago. I still can't really believe I got to see them live finally. Amazing.

Saw him at Amazing Grace in Evanston in 1974. At that time he was playing with the late, great, Dewey Redman.

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