What Charcuterie are You Making?

quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
actually anyone also know of any good books?


I've got "Charcuterie" by Ruhlman and "Cooking by Hand" by Paul Bertolli. Best books on charcuterie that I've found, although I haven't looked in the last few years.

Currently not making charcturie, too hot. But will be making: guanciale, pancetta, bresaola, and duck prosciutto
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
Some guanciale, hams and pork bellies are curing or just hanging around in a well insulated shed, with several pieces residing since 2011 and it all looks real nice.


Interesting thread here. I've been interested in considering making charcuterie. I make plenty of fresh sausage but have never attempted curing and dry-aging.

Out of curiosity, how long do you need to cure these meats before they're ready to go?
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
Final line up set for the weekend:

4 lbs Blood Sausage
5 lbs Turkey with Cranberry and stuffing
3 lbs Fois Gras (I had just under 8 oz I set aside from prepping the lobe)
5 lbs Andouille

What ever pork belly I have left I'll cure for Pancetta.


mind if i get the pancetat recipe?

i've got 10 lbs of pork belly sitting around
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by Captain Cancun:
Some guanciale, hams and pork bellies are curing or just hanging around in a well insulated shed, with several pieces residing since 2011 and it all looks real nice.


Interesting thread here. I've been interested in considering making charcuterie. I make plenty of fresh sausage but have never attempted curing and dry-aging.

Out of curiosity, how long do you need to cure these meats before they're ready to go?


The material you're considering has a lot to do with time. For example the batch of pork cheeks was all prepared and seasoned in 2011 but of that batch half was soon smoked and consumed. My remaining cheek pieces came from really massive hogs which were suited for curing and lengthy aging into guanciale, and I just love to cut paper thin rashers from them to enjoy with really good Bordeaux wine and cheese, dessert, cigar, etc.

Starting back in 1970 I was pitching in on helping my parents with raising and butchering up all kinds of stuff and learned valuable knowledge of all kinds at a hands-on level from family friends and pros.

One of the reasons why I find salumi and charcuterie accessible to me is that it fits itself with lots of flexibility into my current life and time demands.

Good luck to whatever you do. Smile
This post in and of itself is reason enough to move to Canada!

I'd love to get into this, but sourcing great cuts of meat in Boston is either really expensive or really difficult (4+ hour drive to Vermont or Maine). . . but from the sounds of it, the effort would be worth it
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
Parcival - For most sausages - dry, wet or smoked, you don't need great cuts. There have got to be Asian markets in Boston to source things like belly, back fat, casing, duck, blood ect.


i know for a fact that the boston china town has a super market that does pork bellies for ~2-3$/lb

c-mart
109 Lincoln St
(between Tufts St & Beach St)
Boston, MA 02111
quote:
I miss his Charcute's

Basecadet and his beautiful wife joined us at the cottage this weekend, and as usual, he toted 4 amazing cheeses and salami/sausage delicasies..

This has become one of his signature "treats".

I'm thinking we need to have our second annual Wine Couple's Weekend" next spring.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
Parcival - For most sausages - dry, wet or smoked, you don't need great cuts. There have got to be Asian markets in Boston to source things like belly, back fat, casing, duck, blood ect.


i know for a fact that the boston china town has a super market that does pork bellies for ~2-3$/lb

c-mart
109 Lincoln St
(between Tufts St & Beach St)
Boston, MA 02111


I made guanciale from Berkshire pork cheeks and although it cost up the wazoo, it's still less than half the cost of artisan-made guanciale. And the flavor is superior to Costco or Ranch 99 pork.
If you want your bacon to look like it is in the store, use sodium nitrate (sale peter/pink salt). It will also last better but you;re eating nitrates which are apparently bad.

The bacon done without it will still taste great. I have started to put a little pink salt in my cure, my wife is happier.
quote:
Originally posted by vinoevelo:
Started curing 10 lbs of bacon last night with the goal of smoking at some point over the long weekend. Threw some juniper berries into my usual cure this time to see how it turns out.

wait, drain, wait, drain....


oh i havne't been draining

just flipping after a day
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
Is a wine cellar good for hanging a few legs of prosciutto?

Will ruin either wine or meat. Will smell linger?


That's where mine go.


yea book keeps stressing 60 and 70% and the only place in my house where it's remotely controlled like that is the wine cellar but certainly dont want sock smelling wine!
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by vinoevelo:
Started curing 10 lbs of bacon last night with the goal of smoking at some point over the long weekend. Threw some juniper berries into my usual cure this time to see how it turns out.

wait, drain, wait, drain....


oh i havne't been draining

just flipping after a day


i've always drained the 'juice' off as it accumulates, then flipped. I treat the 'juice' production as an indication of the effectiveness of the cure, once the juice stops, the meat is noticeably firmer, then its time to soak in water for 30-45 min, hang dry and smoke.
quote:
Originally posted by vinoevelo:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by vinoevelo:
Started curing 10 lbs of bacon last night with the goal of smoking at some point over the long weekend. Threw some juniper berries into my usual cure this time to see how it turns out.

wait, drain, wait, drain....


oh i havne't been draining

just flipping after a day


i've always drained the 'juice' off as it accumulates, then flipped. I treat the 'juice' production as an indication of the effectiveness of the cure, once the juice stops, the meat is noticeably firmer, then its time to soak in water for 30-45 min, hang dry and smoke.


ah,

i was worried about contaminating it since i'm doing it raw

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