1995 and 2000 Ormes de Pez, St Estephe.

Hosting some "mildly interested in wine" friends (semi newbies) tomorrow night and will do a tasting of 5 year mini vertical of Ormes de Pez: 1995, 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2010.

Mid tier Cru bourgeois, had the 05 about a year ago and was pretty decent.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
1994 Latour


Good luck with that. I've only had a few 1994s, and the best was the Haut Brion.


I just had the 1994 Haut Brion once, and it was wonderful; inspired me to look for other good 1994s.
quote:
Originally posted by VinCentric:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
1994 Latour


Good luck with that. I've only had a few 1994s, and the best was the Haut Brion.


I just had the 1994 Haut Brion once, and it was wonderful; inspired me to look for other good 1994s.


Jancis recently gave it an 18.5 so I'm pulling the cork this Thursday night. We shall see.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by VinCentric:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
1994 Latour


Good luck with that. I've only had a few 1994s, and the best was the Haut Brion.


I just had the 1994 Haut Brion once, and it was wonderful; inspired me to look for other good 1994s.


Jancis recently gave it an 18.5 so I'm pulling the cork this Thursday night. We shall see.


Taking to the wine dinner tonight... fingers crossed Jancis was correct as to when to open.
2003 Croft vintage port.

Regular readers may recall that I am firm on letting ports mature before drinking them, but I'm making an exception this evening in an effort to broaden my horizons. And because the stuff is available across the river at a great price and I want to try to gauge when its drinking window may open.
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
I appreciate you taking one for the team Bman. Look forward to reading your comments tomorrow. No doubt there will be things like "all the ingredients are there, but it just hasn't cooked long enough". Razz


How did I know I would soon be hearing from you re the above post??!! Wink
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2003 Croft vintage port.

Regular readers may recall that I am firm on letting ports mature before drinking them, but I'm making an exception this evening in an effort to broaden my horizons. And because the stuff is available across the river at a great price and I want to try to gauge when its drinking window may open.


I tasted it at an industry tasting in the Pierre Hotel in NYC maybe 8 years ago or so. I don't remember how long it had been opened, but it was terrific. The 1945 we begged a sip of was just about perfect.
quote:
Originally posted by gigabit:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2014 El Nido Clio


Bman, are you standing this so the blueberry skins fall to the bottom? Wink

Don't forget the toasted coconut shavings, Steve! Smile


Smart asses...... Razz

And..... yes......... Smile

But I like blueberries (toasted coconut, a little less so)
A good friend is moving away from Vancouver, so we're heading out to our favorite local bistro for a farewell-ish dinner tonight. I'm taking Krug Grand Cuvée and 1998 Haut Brion. He tells me he's bringing a First Growth either '82 or '86, and an Auslese Riesling.

He has never disappointed. I'm pretty excited to see what he'll pull; his Riesling selection is quite special. Smile
Thanks guys. I don't have much experience with aged wines like this, but it didn't have a lot of fruit left, tannins were fully integrated and there was a candy-like feel on the palate. I couldn't put my finger on exactly what type of candy, other than it was sticky sweet for a few seconds, which was replaced by an earthy/mossy finish.

I was happy to have been able to secure a birth year wine (especially a Monte Bello), so it was more an experience for my wife and me.
quote:
Originally posted by DoktaP:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
1987 Dunn Howell Mountain
1995 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande

Vinoevolo and I will be in Clarksburg Saturday if you'd like our impressions.

This post confuses me in so many ways. Confused Big Grin
Big Grin

So here's my confusion:

Why are you and vinoevelo both going to be in Clarksburg this weekend?

Do you want me to drive up to Clarksburg and join you?

It will be challenging to get your impressions this weekend on wine that we drank LAST weekend (which I think you know, because you commented on my Facebook post).
quote:
Originally posted by DoktaP:
Oops. I thought you had more of the '87 Dunn.
Vinoevolo will be in the area and I snagged him some Chateau Musar from our local KGBO.
Pretty simple.
But anytime you and P want to visit, you are more than welcome.

Cool

And yes, I do have one more '87 Dunn HM. I'd love to put your name (and your P's name) on it for future enjoyment together!
quote:
Originally posted by Bytown Rick:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2009 l'Aventure Estate Cuvee

I expect detailed notes .


My TNs are pretty one dimensional and we are on the road to TO tomorrow for our son's birthday but I will see what I can do!
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2009 Mollydooker Gigglepot cabernet sauvignon.

Don't judge me......

Oh but we do. We do. Wink

Seriously. Gigglepot?


Not sure if you are mocking Mollydookers in general or the Gigglepot specifically (named after Sparky's daughter, FYI) but we're having a first sip now and it's delish! Gonna go really well with our Za pizzas tonight! Razz
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2009 Mollydooker Gigglepot cabernet sauvignon.

Don't judge me......

Oh but we do. We do. Wink

Seriously. Gigglepot?

It's the sister wine of Stinkfinger.


Ok, that one made me giggle! Big Grin No "pots" involved......
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2009 Mollydooker Gigglepot cabernet sauvignon.

Don't judge me......

Oh but we do. We do. Wink

Seriously. Gigglepot?


Not sure if you are mocking Mollydookers in general or the Gigglepot specifically (named after Sparky's daughter, FYI) but we're having a first sip now and it's delish! Gonna go really well with our Za pizzas tonight! Razz

Yeah, just the name. No wine should be called Gigglepot. Or Stinkfinger.

Stinkpot or Gigglefinger I could live with, though.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
- 1988 Krug
- 1990 Montrose


Wow! The 1988 Krug is the best Champagne I've ever had and the 1990 Montrose was singing from magnum a month or so ago. Please post your opinions.


Will do, Board-O. These will be in a SD offline in a few weeks.

I've had the '88 Krug once, and recall it being edged out just a bit by the '88 Taittinger Comtes side-by-side. We'll see how this one shows.
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
1982 Dunn Howell Mountain
2000 Pontet Candy
2003 Calon Segur.

Eek Cool

Also: I hope the Pontet Candy isn't TOO candied.


Stupid iPhone Big Grin


Ah yes, always the phone, never the user Big Grin

Super jealous of the '82 Dunn HM, please post your thoughts, TIA
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
1982 Dunn Howell Mountain
2000 Pontet Canet
2003 Calon Segur.


the 2003 calon is no fun to drink yet.

it's still going to be full on tannins.

if you do drink it, i'd recommend something like a 4 hour slow ox


Was looking at a few recent notes and they said, while young, it was approachable. I have 5 more I think, so I thought I'd open one. Thanks for the recommendation on the decant etc.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
1982 Dunn Howell Mountain
2000 Pontet Canet
2003 Calon Segur.


the 2003 calon is no fun to drink yet.

it's still going to be full on tannins.

if you do drink it, i'd recommend something like a 4 hour slow ox


I'd say a two-three hour splash decant. I imagine it's very far from ready.
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
1982 Dunn Howell Mountain
2000 Pontet Canet
2003 Calon Segur.


the 2003 calon is no fun to drink yet.

it's still going to be full on tannins.

if you do drink it, i'd recommend something like a 4 hour slow ox


Was looking at a few recent notes and they said, while young, it was approachable. I have 5 more I think, so I thought I'd open one. Thanks for the recommendation on the decant etc.


approachable maybe after you down a bottle of some cult cali cab =)
1994 Warre
2001 Far Niente
2008 l'Aventure Estate Cuvee
2012 Martinelli Pinot Noir Bondi Home Ranch Water Trough Vineyard

For those of you who attended Windsor offlines in the past -- and can still remember who else was there! -- the original Gman is coming for lunch!
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
1991 Beringer Private Reserve

Oooo, post notes? Smile

Just saw this!

We opened three Beringer Private Reserve that night: 1991, 1997 and 2001. All showed well, but the 1991 was truly special. Pretty much in the perfect place in its evolvement. And it kept shifting in the glass over the course of the evening. I believe it was the WOTN for most of us.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Thanks much! I've always like Beringer PR, and should make a point to look for more of it at estate sales. Did the '97 and '01 seem ready? Or just too young for your palate?

The 1997 and 2001 showed older than the 1991 - especially the 1997, IIRC. They were all very good, but the 1991 was the freshest and most complex of the three.

But the 1991 we opened was a bit of a unicorn. VinT and I bought a bunch of wine from a US dealer who purchased a private cellar where the wine had been stored since purchase in a very cold, very damp cellar. All of the bottle looked like crap - they had all been wrapped in plastic wrap, which was crumbling, and the labels themselves were also crumbling and were covered in mold.

But all the bottles have shown like they were frozen in time. They have evolved, but they are all showing much younger and fresher than you would expect. The 91 Beringer was a beauty, as was an 87 Dunn HM.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Thanks much! I've always like Beringer PR, and should make a point to look for more of it at estate sales. Did the '97 and '01 seem ready? Or just too young for your palate?

The 1997 and 2001 showed older than the 1991 - especially the 1997, IIRC. They were all very good, but the 1991 was the freshest and most complex of the three.

But the 1991 we opened was a bit of a unicorn. VinT and I bought a bunch of wine from a US dealer who purchased a private cellar where the wine had been stored since purchase in a very cold, very damp cellar. All of the bottle looked like crap - they had all been wrapped in plastic wrap, which was crumbling, and the labels themselves were also crumbling and were covered in mold.

But all the bottles have shown like they were frozen in time. They have evolved, but they are all showing much younger and fresher than you would expect. The 91 Beringer was a beauty, as was an 87 Dunn HM.
I've not had the 1991 Beringer PR, but I can say that the 1992 was the best vintage of this wine that I've had closely followed by the 1990.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Thanks much! I've always like Beringer PR, and should make a point to look for more of it at estate sales. Did the '97 and '01 seem ready? Or just too young for your palate?

The 1997 and 2001 showed older than the 1991 - especially the 1997, IIRC. They were all very good, but the 1991 was the freshest and most complex of the three.

But the 1991 we opened was a bit of a unicorn. VinT and I bought a bunch of wine from a US dealer who purchased a private cellar where the wine had been stored since purchase in a very cold, very damp cellar. All of the bottle looked like crap - they had all been wrapped in plastic wrap, which was crumbling, and the labels themselves were also crumbling and were covered in mold.

But all the bottles have shown like they were frozen in time. They have evolved, but they are all showing much younger and fresher than you would expect. The 91 Beringer was a beauty, as was an 87 Dunn HM.

Just curious - was the plastic wrap just around the body of the bottle (the label) or did it encapsulate the top of the bottle as well?
quote:
Originally posted by SD-Wineaux:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
Thanks much! I've always like Beringer PR, and should make a point to look for more of it at estate sales. Did the '97 and '01 seem ready? Or just too young for your palate?

The 1997 and 2001 showed older than the 1991 - especially the 1997, IIRC. They were all very good, but the 1991 was the freshest and most complex of the three.

But the 1991 we opened was a bit of a unicorn. VinT and I bought a bunch of wine from a US dealer who purchased a private cellar where the wine had been stored since purchase in a very cold, very damp cellar. All of the bottle looked like crap - they had all been wrapped in plastic wrap, which was crumbling, and the labels themselves were also crumbling and were covered in mold.

But all the bottles have shown like they were frozen in time. They have evolved, but they are all showing much younger and fresher than you would expect. The 91 Beringer was a beauty, as was an 87 Dunn HM.

Just curious - was the plastic wrap just around the body of the bottle (the label) or did it encapsulate the top of the bottle as well?

Up to the shoulder or start of the neck. Depended on the bottle.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
1982 Grange

Wow, you'd think it was someone's birthday or something. Wink

That's funny. I have a 2009 Kosta Browne that I'm bringing over someone's house who is celebrating a birthday.
quote:
Originally posted by max:
quote:
Originally posted by Bytown Rick:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
1982 Grange

Looking forward to the tasting note.
Had both the 1981 and 1982 within the past year and the 1982 was by far better. Still very fresh and lively.

Thanks Max.
quote:
Originally posted by Vinaigre:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
1970 Graham
Smart money is on the first option.


If your bottle shows anywhere close to the one we had last weekend, you will be in for a treat!

Enjoy


That's the one he chose so I will let you know when we see you in a few weeks!

Speaking of which, would it be a problem to bring a decanted bottle of port to the restaurant? I did it at one place which was apparently a no-no, but then no issue when I did it at another. Port never shows well when popped and poured.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
Speaking of which, would it be a problem to bring a decanted bottle of port to the restaurant? I did it at one place which was apparently a no-no, but then no issue when I did it at another. Port never shows well when popped and poured.

bman, to get around the "open bottle" restrictions, you could try dropping the wine off at the restaurant a day or two before so that the somm can decant it for you in advance of your arrival. Works for me Wink .
I'll tell you what I did at The Marc in Walla Walla where wine has to be opened in the restaurant. I decanted a Grand Cru Burgundy in our room, including filtering the sediment bearing portion, rinsed the bottle, poured the wine back in and pushed the cork back all the way and took it to the restaurant for them to open.
quote:
Originally posted by Bytown Rick:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
Speaking of which, would it be a problem to bring a decanted bottle of port to the restaurant? I did it at one place which was apparently a no-no, but then no issue when I did it at another. Port never shows well when popped and poured.

bman, to get around the "open bottle" restrictions, you could try dropping the wine off at the restaurant a day or two before so that the somm can decant it for you in advance of your arrival. Works for me Wink .


Problem is that we are arriving in Montreal only a few hours before the dinner. But I might do that or just call the restaurant and ask for their indulgence. OR, bring a sauternes instead....
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I'll tell you what I did at The Marc in Walla Walla where wine has to be opened in the restaurant. I decanted a Grand Cru Burgundy in our room, including filtering the sediment bearing portion, rinsed the bottle, poured the wine back in and pushed the cork back all the way and took it to the restaurant for them to open.


That could work for a younger bottle but probably not a 40 year old port - the corks rarely survive being taken from the bottle.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
So use a cork from another bottle!


Servers in Montreal are rather sharp - pretty sure they would see a cork without the port house or the vintage and figure out that it was a cork from another bottle, and that the port had been decanted earlier.

Remember that here in Canada, we try to respect the law and stay out of trouble, though that is a little less true in Quebec than elsewhere in the country.....
As I understand it, the law states the bottle has to be opened in the restaurant. If there's a cork in it, even if it's been previously opened, they're opening it. Does it say a bottle can only be opened once? The somm at The Marc knew our bottle had been decanted, but he opened it.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
As I understand it, the law states the bottle has to be opened in the restaurant. If there's a cork in it, even if it's been previously opened, they're opening it. Does it say a bottle can only be opened once? The somm at The Marc knew our bottle had been decanted, but he opened it.


I'm not sure. I will seek guidance from the Montreal gang
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by Vinaigre:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
1970 Graham
Smart money is on the first option.


If your bottle shows anywhere close to the one we had last weekend, you will be in for a treat!

Enjoy


That's the one he chose so I will let you know when we see you in a few weeks!

Speaking of which, would it be a problem to bring a decanted bottle of port to the restaurant? I did it at one place which was apparently a no-no, but then no issue when I did it at another. Port never shows well when popped and poured.


fyi

if you do,

get a spare cork handy and press it in the full way.

i'm not sure on LCBO laws but NY sla, the transport of wine must be fully corked and in the trunk of the car.

it's up to the discretion of the restaurant to allow you, but alot more of them seem to be fine if they can reinsert a wine key into the cork.
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I'll tell you what I did at The Marc in Walla Walla where wine has to be opened in the restaurant. I decanted a Grand Cru Burgundy in our room, including filtering the sediment bearing portion, rinsed the bottle, poured the wine back in and pushed the cork back all the way and took it to the restaurant for them to open.


That could work for a younger bottle but probably not a 40 year old port - the corks rarely survive being taken from the bottle.


save a cork from another bottle and just shove it in!
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
1970 Mouton Rothschild

Change of plans.

1992 Dominus Estate
1992 Dunn Vineyards Petite Sirah Howell Mountain


I wouldn't wait too long with that Mouton. I'm sure you'll enjoy the two 1992s. The 1992 Dominus is the best Dominus I've ever tasted. I hope you'll post notes.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
1970 Mouton Rothschild

Change of plans.

1992 Dominus Estate
1992 Dunn Vineyards Petite Sirah Howell Mountain


I wouldn't wait too long with that Mouton. I'm sure you'll enjoy the two 1992s. The 1992 Dominus is the best Dominus I've ever tasted. I hope you'll post notes.

Ended up opening all three.

The Mouton's cork was pure sponge that disintegrated as we were removing it. It took a fair bit of work to get it out, but we (to be fair - not me) did so without getting any remnants in the bottle. The wine itself was much better than anyone expected, and got even better over the 2 hours that we drank it. Without question it showed as a well-aged example of Bordeaux with plenty of tertiary notes, but there was plenty of fruit, excellent acidity and good weight. A real treat.

The 92 Dunn Petite Sirah HM initially had a funky nose, but the palate was superb: refined, restrained, deep and complex. I wouldn't have guessed Petite Sirah, but a very good right bank Bordeaux. I had three of these and this was the last one. I also have the 1993. A terrific wine, if you can find it.

I've opened quite a few 1992 Dominus and they've all been fantastic, but this one was relatively (and oddly) green and thin. Still enjoyable, but not close to the quality level I'm used to. This bottle was from a different source than all my other bottles, though. I have 5 more from the original source, and I'm confident they'll show well.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
quote:
Originally posted by bhauk:
1998 Smith Haut Lafitte

I enjoyed one last week - one of the few undervalued Bordeaux that drinks above its price point which can sometimes be had at $60 per


I got a few off Winebid just below that price. I assume you are the DoubleD on CT, your note made me have it standing for tonight.
Having with mule deer loin steak on the grill, this deer has little gaminess so expecting good things.
quote:
Originally posted by indybob:
quote:
Originally posted by VinCentric:
2005 Malescot


Is this your first? Please post notes or impressions. Enjoy!


Yes, first for this vintage of Malescot. I figured time to give it a try.

No formal notes. Had this at Le Select Bistro with Beef Bourguignon. Drinking really well. Good on decant. Started into it after about 1.50-2 hrs. Opened up beautifully. Tannins are there but integrated and very smooth. Probably at the beginning of it's window. Hint of tertiary development only. Beautiful. Drink or hold. Will definitely improve but great now.
Stood up a 1996 Giuseppe E Figlio Mascarello Barolo Ca d'Morissio Riserva Monprivato this weekend. Pulled the cork this morning and poured a quick taste before the gym. I'm not the best judge of wine at 4:45am but it was already very nice. Hopefully it opens up a bit more doing the slox ox all day. A little pasta and black truffle on the menu tonight.
quote:
Originally posted by VinCentric:
quote:
Originally posted by VinCentric:
2005 Malescot

Beautiful. Drink or hold. Will definitely improve but great now.


Excellent. Thanks much. I don't have this one, but have been eyeing one of my '05 Lascombes, and may take a peek this year.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
quote:
Originally posted by winederlust:
quote:
Originally posted by Duojet:
1994 Leoville Barton


I had one of these last fall and really enjoyed it - I will be interested in your experience

Likewise.


I've had several of these, with one left in the cellar. Interested as well as to how it's holding up.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2001 Feudi di San Gregorio Serpico


Still sitting on two of these. Love to hear how it shows when you get around to opening it.


I will try to remember, though it's one of several bottles I'm standing for mrs bman's birthday supper this weekend, meaning she may choose another bottle. I'd have mentioned the others too but couldn't remember the vintages off the top of my head!
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by bman:
2001 Feudi di San Gregorio Serpico


Still sitting on two of these. Love to hear how it shows when you get around to opening it.


I don't think our thoughts will be much use to you TLV. While we liked it we found that it really wasn't our style. It was very tannic and rustic, too much so on opening but then after a half hour in the decanter and with some gorgonzola gnocchi first and grilled red meat second it smoothed out and because nicer. But still not really our style. The restaurant owner and server both loved it though, FWIW!
quote:
Originally posted by Italian Wino:
B-O,

That MSD from Raphet looks familiar. Razz

IW


Smile It should! Hey, did you ever get paid for it? I was going to take a 1982 Leoville Poyferre to a BYO dinner, but I figured a Burgundy would be better. This place has plenty of seafood options.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by Italian Wino:
B-O,

That MSD from Raphet looks familiar. Razz

IW


Smile It should! Hey, did you ever get paid for it? I was going to take a 1982 Leoville Poyferre to a BYO dinner, but I figured a Burgundy would be better. This place has plenty of seafood options.


Don't know if you have the 1990 Leoville Poyferre in your cellar, but for my palate it is one of the very finest from a great vintage.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:

Don't know if you have the 1990 Leoville Poyferre in your cellar, but for my palate it is one of the very finest from a great vintage.


I have the other two Leovilles.
I have the 90 Poyferre and look forward to popping it. Would love to do a side by side comparison with all 3 1990 Leovilles.
2001 Kistler Pinot Noir Hirsch Vineyard.

A forgotten bottle. I bought this about 5 or 6 years ago in Santa Barbara from a source that has provided me with some excellent older wines, so hoping that this one will still show well. We'll be taking it to our favourite French bistro tonight to find out.

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