What are you Smoking (BBQ)?

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Originally posted by snipes:
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Originally posted by g-man:
bah i typed cold smoking and bacon now all the websites i'm visiting have ads related to cold smoking and bacon.

bloody heck.

I'm going to add "escorts" and "guns" just for because.


Try hookers and blow and let me know how it works out.


disney shows ??!??
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Originally posted by g-man:
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Originally posted by mneeley490:
I have 3 types of bacon experiments in the smoker right now.

1. Maple--where I've used both maple sugar in the cure, and coated with maple syrup. Getting significant real maple flavor into bacon is harder than you might think. Commercial maple bacon is done thru injecting extracts and chemicals.


maple is like bbq sauce in my opinion.

so i do is that I'll cure with maple sugar, but come smoking time, I'll smoke as low as the WSM will go. the bacon without a maple syrup coat as it makes it way too black and the bacon doesnt take the smoke. This is just for the smoke to take + the cure. Take it out after (2? hours, i can't recall exactly), lightly fork poke it through out and then cover it in warm maple syrup and seal it up in either foil or a container. if you let it rest like that, the bacon will really take the maple syrup flavor.

Interesting. I'll try that next time.
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Originally posted by snipes:
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Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
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Originally posted by snipes:
chicken wings.


Have you done this before? How long do you smoke them?


It's a regular thing at my place. 275 for 90 minutes. I like a crispy skin so I finish them for 2-3 minutes under the broiler. Perfect every time.

Same thing I do for my Buffalo sauce-injected wings. You get the flavor, but not the mess.
Not exactly BBQ but it's one of my favorites for my smoker.

I brown pork chorizo in a pan on the stove, chill it, mix it 50/50 with shredded extra sharp cheddar (I like Tilamook), stuff the mix into jalapenos, smoke them over a mix of apple & cherry wood for an hour/hour and a half at about 250 degrees.

Phenomenal with a side of sour cream.

I cut the tops off the jalapenos and use a butter knife to get all of the seeds/white stuff out of the insides to make room for the mix.

I also use a jalapeno tray I got at wally world to hold them up (works best with smaller diameter peppers). I have to put a cookie sheet underneath or it makes a terrible mess inside my smoker.

Now what I need to do is figure what type of wine goes best with them... I'm thinking of a nice auslese or maybe something Italian.
Rabbit (not wild). I'm brining it with salt, garlic, herbs and a small amount of coconut sugar. Being so lean, I'm going to try either wrapping one half in bacon or spread a layer of duck fat over it in case the other half gets dry. Any recommendations for those who have tried? I'm going around 250 for 2-2.5hrs after an 8 hour brine.
The rabbit turned out mushy. Maybe brined too long or cooked at the wrong temp.

Did my first ever pork belly on Sunday. Scored and then rubbed with paprika, black pepper, onion powder, rubbed fennel seeds into the cracks, and salt. Smoked it for 1.5hrs at 200 with apple wood, wrapped tightly in parchment paper, then foil and did another 3 hours at 200. Refrigerated until cool, cut into small portions and crisped them up in the oven. Went great with sticky rice and cold green bean salad.

A couple weeks ago I smoked a beef tenderloin wrapped in a bacon weave with a smoky bacon bourbon sauce..

This week I'm doing a smoked chinese five spice whole chicken. Currently brining. Will dry and apply a rub and smoke until 165 (thinking about using grapevine wood). Also have a vinegar/soy based five spice sauce to go with it.

VM

I did not remove the skin. The skin did not get as crispy as I would like but overall the bird was very tasty and juicy. If you want a crispier skin, you can take the chicken out of the smoker at 145 degrees and finish is in an oven for about 30 minutes at 375 degrees until is reaches 165 internal.

VM

I had that same smoker in the 2D model. The only difficult (impossible) thing to control was humidity with the tiny hole at the top. Meat, fish, chicken turned out awesome, smoking to dehydrate certain foods, jerky, chipotle chilis, etc didn't work like something like the NuVu but the price is hard to beat for what you get.

winoca posted:

I had that same smoker in the 2D model. The only difficult (impossible) thing to control was humidity with the tiny hole at the top. Meat, fish, chicken turned out awesome, smoking to dehydrate certain foods, jerky, chipotle chilis, etc didn't work like something like the NuVu but the price is hard to beat for what you get.

I found it on OfferUp for $80. Couldn't pass that up.

Pulled beef came out great, just enough smoke with only about 3 oz. of wood used.

I have a Cookshack electric smoker.  It controls the temperature for smoking and has a readout and probe for meat temperature.  Very easy to use, all stainless steel, but not cheap.  Made ribs last week for a group and got a lot of positive comments.  Very happy with it.

Treated myself to a late BDay prezzie last weekend and picked up a Primo Oval 300.  

On Saturday I fired up the grill to screaming hot and did a couple of t-bones on the direct and indirect sides.

On Sunday, I smoked a 6 pound capon which turned out beautifully.  Tender, juicy and very tasty.

I love the oval shape of the Primo and with the firebox divider, building direct/indirect sides is a breeze.  Temperature control was easy and the grill held its heat really well.

The only hard part was telling the Mrs. that I need to spend the day at home this Sunday to put the Primo through its paces smoking a brisket.  She'll forgive me in the end I'm sure.

 

thelostverse posted:
ljch1210 posted:

hey guys, which wood do you choose for your grill?

I assume you're asking about smoke wood, not a grill made out of wood.  For me, it depends on what I'm smoking.  Anything specific?

Alder for salmon. Lighter fruit woods or maple for poultry & some cuts of pork. Other pork cuts like bacon and ham call for hickory, pecan, or cherry.  For beef you can get into the heavier stuff like hickory or sometimes mesquite; many people like oak also. Once you get an idea of what you like, you can start to mix it up.

mneeley490 posted:
thelostverse posted:
ljch1210 posted:

hey guys, which wood do you choose for your grill?

I assume you're asking about smoke wood, not a grill made out of wood.  For me, it depends on what I'm smoking.  Anything specific?

Alder for salmon. Lighter fruit woods or maple for poultry & some cuts of pork. Other pork cuts like bacon and ham call for hickory, pecan, or cherry.  For beef you can get into the heavier stuff like hickory or sometimes mesquite; many people like oak also. Once you get an idea of what you like, you can start to mix it up.

thanks so much.

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