I'm going to do a full brisket next time, but I haven't been able to find one small enough. The market had 14-16 lb packers. Something just under 10 lbs would probably fit well on that size BGE. Or I could trim off some of the flat until it fits on the grates.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
I'm going to do a full brisket next time, but I haven't been able to find one small enough. The market had 14-16 lb packers. Something just under 10 lbs would probably fit well on that size BGE. Or I could trim off some of the flat until it fits on the grates.


It's going to be difficult to find a full brisket under 10 lbs. You'd probably be better off getting a full packer and separating the point from the flat yourself. Sometimes I have seen a flat with some of the point still attached, but not very often.
Yestday:

my best brisket yet, around 7 lbs, great smoke ring and just dripping with juice when i sliced it (rested it around 40 mins)

pork shoulder: only had a small taste, it took 3 hours longer than planned and it was getting late (11 PM). the skin was great, will have more in a couple days when I get back from a quick work trip but my wife/daughter will enjoy and report back tonight Smile
The picture you showed us was Texas BBQ worthy.

quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
Yestday:

my best brisket yet, around 7 lbs, great smoke ring and just dripping with juice when i sliced it (rested it around 40 mins)

pork shoulder: only had a small taste, it took 3 hours longer than planned and it was getting late (11 PM). the skin was great, will have more in a couple days when I get back from a quick work trip but my wife/daughter will enjoy and report back tonight Smile
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Added a new smoker/grill to my collection. Green Mountain Grills--Daniel Boone model pellet grill. First time with a pellet pooper. Now I get to start that learning curve all over again. Big Grin

It finally quit e'ffing raining around here so I can get some serious bbq going.
Christened the GMG with some chicken wings and bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin a few days ago. Both came out great!
So now for an over-nighter. I just put an 11 lb. brisket packer on at 9pm, at 230°. We'll see how long it takes. I have it hooked up to a temp probe with an alarm. Hopefully, it'll go at least 12 hours, and I will be able to sleep in a little bit tomorrow.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Added a new smoker/grill to my collection. Green Mountain Grills--Daniel Boone model pellet grill. First time with a pellet pooper. Now I get to start that learning curve all over again. Big Grin


GMG is very easy to use. Just like an oven. Set the temp and come back to check meat temps.
I brine 2 chickens in salt and lemons/limes for 24 hours. Grill set at 340. Flip it in an hour and take it off about 30 minutes later. Easy to get consistent results.
quote:
Originally posted by ADC:

GMG is very easy to use. Just like an oven. Set the temp and come back to check meat temps.
I brine 2 chickens in salt and lemons/limes for 24 hours. Grill set at 340. Flip it in an hour and take it off about 30 minutes later. Easy to get consistent results.

Just finishing up now. Should be done by 11:30am PDT. I was a little surprised that I had to refill the hopper twice. Once at 4 am and again at 7:30 am. It probably got down to 50° or below last night, and there's always some wind, so I figure that must have had something to do with it.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
Do those pellets inhibit the creation of the smoke ring? Or do you add actual wood chips like apple, hickory, etc.?

Not sure I understand the question. The pellets are wood. Smoke rings are created by the meat absorbing the nitrogen dioxide produced from burning wood or charcoal. Here is a good little article on it.
At higher temperatures, there won't be as noticeable a ring, as the higher heat tends to consume more of the smoke. They make products to create more smoke in the chamber with other pellets, so you can get more of the specific flavor profile you're looking for. I have one of the tube smokers, but haven't tried it out yet. I'm still experimenting on this new grill.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Not sure I understand the question. The pellets are wood. Smoke rings are created by the meat absorbing the nitrogen dioxide produced from burning wood or charcoal.

I understand the pellets are wood. But, isn't it compressed wood? If so, what is the binding agent? And do you think that material inhibits the smoke ring. My understanding is that if you are BBQing, you want the lower temperatures anyway.
you could cheat and rub curing salt #1 around the outside as you're cooking hehe

i'm starting to be of the mind that the smoke ring is just looks appeal.

and you could technically brine the meat with curing salt before hand to get the same texture as a very very long smoke.
My wife brought home a pork butt over the holiday weekend. Timing was tricky as we had golf games planned four days in a row. I decided to do a night cook on Monday night. Fired up the smoker and had the butt on by 8:30 PM. I had planned to go with the smoker throughout the cook, but by 1:30 AM I changed course and put the butt into the oven inside set at 225 degrees to get a good night sleep. Woke up early yesterday and cranked the heat to 275 to finish. Foiled through the stall and had the butt out of the oven and in the cambro by 10 AM. Spent most of the rest of the day at the club and pulled the pork at about 6 PM. Delicious.

I usually enjoy sitting on the deck throughout a smoke, but the timing on this one just didn't work out. The house smelled glorious in the morning though.

For an upcoming smoke, I'm going to do some pork belly burnt ends this weekend.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
i'm starting to be of the mind that the smoke ring is just looks appeal.



A smoke ring is nice optics, but ultimately means nothing to the taste of the food.


The ring itsef is just nice optics, but the nitrates definitely do change the texture of the meat.

the nitrates binds the meat molecules and changes it to gives meat that firmer not as gritty "ham" texture.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I understand the pellets are wood. But, isn't it compressed wood? If so, what is the binding agent? And do you think that material inhibits the smoke ring. My understanding is that if you are BBQing, you want the lower temperatures anyway.

On the better quality pellets, there is no binder other than steam. Heat from the process releases lignins in the wood which act as a natural binder, holding the pellet together as it is compressed. Some lesser manufacturers will add a food-grade oil or wax as a binder or flavoring agent. I never buy those. In fact, if you want true flavor wood pellets, you need to read how they're made. Most start with oak or alder as a neutral base, then add a percentage of apple or cherry or whatever, and call it good.
And yes, true bbq is low and slow. But this particular new grill can also go up to 500° to cook steaks or burgers using pellets.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
Are there any anti-pellet purists in the house? I have some friends who wouldn't be caught dead with pellets. I'd like to think I could tell the difference but I can't.

I've been doing this for long enough, that I can tell you what kind of wood you're using, based on the smell of the smoke alone. If you're talking about the difference between pellets and charcoal, sure, there is a difference in taste, with pellets giving a more "woodsy" flavor, even when I add wood chunks to the charcoal. Each method has its pros and cons, and flavor can be subjective. For instance, I'm making teriyaki chicken tonight, and I much prefer the char flavor that I get from charcoal on that.

I have grills and smokers that are charcoal, electric, and now pellet. (I've dumped the propane one, as no longer necessary. Its only pro was convenience, a quick heating time.) I've even built a temporary pit from cinder blocks and expanded steel to cook a whole pig. The only thing I don't have is a big, steel, stick burner. Not that I don't like the flavor they produce; there is a great bbq stand near me that makes some really good 'Que on theirs, but it looks like a civil war, iron-clad battleship. Even the smaller ones that look like mini attack submarines aren't really built for the average weekend hobbyist. They take a long time to build up heat, and need a large, steady supply of wood. Most people don't have the time for that kind of commitment.
So I fired up the smoker today and have a slab of baby backs on, and the butcher talked me into a slab of boneless ribs...I don't have high hopes, but figured I'd give them a try.

My question though has to do with smoked sausage. I just got back from a week in Dallas, TX and that sausage thing they do there is a delicious and different animal from what we do here. I'm at a loss though on where to start. What I had (twice) was a spicy red colored semi dense sausage served in slices. It's not a brat or italian sausage. My butcher's grinder was down or he said he'd make me some, but what the heck should I be looking for to try and replicate it?
I left with a stick of anduille and some keilbasa as well.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
So I fired up the smoker today and have a slab of baby backs on, and the butcher talked me into a slab of boneless ribs...I don't have high hopes, but figured I'd give them a try.

My question though has to do with smoked sausage. I just got back from a week in Dallas, TX and that sausage thing they do there is a delicious and different animal from what we do here. I'm at a loss though on where to start. What I had (twice) was a spicy red colored semi dense sausage served in slices. It's not a brat or italian sausage. My butcher's grinder was down or he said he'd make me some, but what the heck should I be looking for to try and replicate it?
I left with a stick of anduille and some keilbasa as well.


What you want to re-create is the jalepeno sausage from the Hard Eight...so good...
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Not sure I understand the question. The pellets are wood. Smoke rings are created by the meat absorbing the nitrogen dioxide produced from burning wood or charcoal.

I understand the pellets are wood. But, isn't it compressed wood? If so, what is the binding agent? And do you think that material inhibits the smoke ring. My understanding is that if you are BBQing, you want the lower temperatures anyway.


DD -- reading backwards here so someone may have already answered this

You get every bit of smoke-ring with pellets as with hard wood briquettes and wood chunks. I've done side by side comparisons of the BGE and my pellet grill multiple times (once with Snipes present). And, despite nay-sayers, I have found that the pellet grills best the BGE and other smokers in the following ways:
1) Brainlessly easy to use (that said, you do lose the "craft" and hands on nature of smoking if you have the time and interest to do that)
2) Amazingly consistent, set and forget results
3) Amazingly similar end-result to a more traditional smoker. The one thing my wife has noticed is that the pellet-smoked meats don't seem to taste as smokey as their BGE counter-parts and she likes this quality of the pellet grills. Of course, level of smoke on a BGE is 100% depending on the type of charcoal and wood chunks you use so it's hard to say any more about that

Now, just waiting for Shane to chime in and tell me he will smack down both my pellet smoker AND BGE with a Weber Smokey Mountain!
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:

Now, just waiting for Shane to chime in and tell me he will smack down both my pellet smoker AND BGE with a Weber Smokey Mountain!


WSM user here. I'm about to add a Weber Summit Charcoal grill as well. I won't bad mouth pellet smokers or BGE as I've never used one. I'm a Weber guy to the core.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:

Now, just waiting for Shane to chime in and tell me he will smack down both my pellet smoker AND BGE with a Weber Smokey Mountain!


WSM user here. I'm about to add a Weber Summit Charcoal grill as well. I won't bad mouth pellet smokers or BGE as I've never used one. I'm a Weber guy to the core.

I have both a Weber Performer and a Weber One-Touch Gold. As much as I like my other toys, these are still the most versatile grillers/smokers in my lineup. Can't beat a steak grilled over charcoal, imo. They just take more time and tending, which is fine if I have the time.
quote:
Can't beat a steak grilled over charcoal, imo. They just take more time and tending, which is fine if I have the time.


Agree with steak over charcoal. And, for the price it's pretty darned hard to beat a Weber

I enjoyed working with the BGE for several years. But, with two young kids at home I found I just did not have the time I wanted to play with this grill.

For now, the plug and play convenience of the pellet grill provides much needed convenience!
Found a 4.75 lb. frozen Butterball turkey breast roast at Costco the other day for about $13. It's in the smoker now at 275°, with some rub and injected with garlic butter. Using orange wood for smoke; I really like orange with poultry. If it turns out well, I will probably go back and get a couple more for Thanksgiving. So much easier than messing with a whole turkey.
My oldest son passed his test today to become a black belt in Tae Kwon Do. Been smoking a 19 lb packer brisket since midnight on our Traeger pellet smoker. Heading home soon to confirm internal temp and crank up as necessary, then will wrap and stash in a cooler for a couple hours. Good amount of family and friends will be here in a few hours to celebrate. Smile
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........

Fusion, usually after brining, you want to cut off a small test piece and fry it to test the salt level. If it's too much, you can reduce some of the salt by submersing in cold water for a few hours, changing out the water once or twice. Then dry and smoke.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........

Fusion, usually after brining, you want to cut off a small test piece and fry it to test the salt level. If it's too much, you can reduce some of the salt by submersing in cold water for a few hours, changing out the water once or twice. Then dry and smoke.

Thanks for the pointer! After wrapping and chilling overnight, the saltiness seemed to have tamped down a couple of notches. Still a little too salty for my liking, but more than fine as long as consumed with other, less salty foods.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........

Fusion, usually after brining, you want to cut off a small test piece and fry it to test the salt level. If it's too much, you can reduce some of the salt by submersing in cold water for a few hours, changing out the water once or twice. Then dry and smoke.


Yes definitely your methods is correct to adjust the salt level..
Speaking of Bacon . . . anyone have thoughts about the safety of making bacon and cold smoking?

I check in on the website amazingribs.com often and the guy that runs that website very strongly cautions against home cooks making their own bacon. I'm assuming if you use an adequate amount of Prague powder, you are avoiding potential contamination, but has not been a theory I have felt confident testing
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Speaking of Bacon . . . anyone have thoughts about the safety of making bacon and cold smoking?

I check in on the website amazingribs.com often and the guy that runs that website very strongly cautions against home cooks making their own bacon. I'm assuming if you use an adequate amount of Prague powder, you are avoiding potential contamination, but has not been a theory I have felt confident testing

Sorry, but IMO and the opinion of many other smokers that I am in contact with, the guy that runs the amazingribs.com website doesn't know he's talking about. On many subjects.

I've made 100's of lbs. of bacon. Hot, warm, and cold smoked. Once the meat is cured, it is pretty durable. There will never be a problem, as long as you follow a few simple rules.
First off, make sure your bacon is thoroughly cured. You can do a straight salt cure, like in some of the charcuterie books I've read, but I wouldn't recommend it. Use Prague powder/pink salt (not Himalayan)/cure #1; it's all the same thing. (Morton's Tenderquick is something altogether different, having regular salt and other stuff already blended in. I don't care for it, and you can't use it as a substitute in brining formula calculations.)
For dry curing, the formula is .25% cure #1 and 2%-3% each salt and sugar, by weight of the meat. It will penetrate 1/4" per side, per day, plus two more days to make sure equilibrium is reached. Brining time should actually be 2+ weeks for the sugar to take effect. It is a large molecule and doesn't penetrate the meat as fast as salt. The meat will have a salty flavor with shorter curing times.

For wet curing (which is what I do, as it is as foolproof as you can get.)
Per gallon of cold water:
1 T. cure #1
1/3 c. to 1 cup sea salt ( I use just over 1/3 cup for low sodium bacon. If done properly, you won't miss the salt.)
1/2 c. white sugar
1 c. brown sugar
Usually do 2 weeks, but I have let it go as long as 3 (when something else came up), and once equilibrium is reached, it will not absorb any more cure or salt.

As for the cold smoking, it is best done in cooler temps in the Fall or Spring, with the smoker between 40°F to 70°F. Any colder, and condensation will form on the meat and ruin the smoke. Any warmer, and you begin to change the texture of the finished product. I have cold smoked bacon for 8 hours a day, for 3 days, putting it back in the fridge each night. But I know some who smoke every day, up to a week. It depends on what kind of wood you're using as well. For my 3-day, I used a light peach wood. Truthfully, it could have gone a couple more days. But if you're using something heavier like hickory, you need to adjust accordingly. It's all a matter of personal preference.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Found a 4.75 lb. frozen Butterball turkey breast roast at Costco the other day for about $13. It's in the smoker now at 275°, with some rub and injected with garlic butter. Using orange wood for smoke; I really like orange with poultry. If it turns out well, I will probably go back and get a couple more for Thanksgiving. So much easier than messing with a whole turkey.

This turned out very well. I have two of them brining in orange juice tonight, & will go into the smoker tomorrow morning. The in-laws always want to take some home.
Being as it is that I am, the "very best of show" in the pit, I am taking the honours of smoking the turkey this holiday. It's nearly finished, and will be resting for several hours. Injecting is for amateurs and the BBQ competition circuit Roll Eyes I am also cold smoking a side of wild salmon, after which I had cured it with salt, sugar and my Award Winning proprietary blend of herbs and spices. A prime rib roast will also be on the table, carefully slow cooked in my wood burning oven, thank you very much.

Cheers!
~W&FE~
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Wine and Food Expert:
Injecting is for amateurs and the BBQ competition circuit Roll Eyes

You would not think so if you were ever to have the privilege of trying my pulled pork, .


Pulled pork, should be, simple, rubbed and cooked slow, low, absolutely! My proprietary dry rub with salt, pepper, paprika, onion and garlic powder has won the world over and influenced some of the great Pit Masters of the BBQ world, mind you. I have signed multiple NDS for my services and cannot divulge their information. However, I smoke the pork on my homemade (I am, a self-taught welder, mind you again) smoker, sustained at 275 degrees. 6 hours later, I begin spraying with a 50/50 blend of my home made apple cidre vinegar and juice from my Pink Lady apples, directly from my Estate orchard, obviously!. Wrap in foil when the bark is "perfect" and cook to doneness, if you know what that is Roll Eyes . I trust you will use my method and never turn back, truthfully.
Cheers!
~W&FE~
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Found a 4.75 lb. frozen Butterball turkey breast roast at Costco the other day for about $13. It's in the smoker now at 275°, with some rub and injected with garlic butter. Using orange wood for smoke; I really like orange with poultry. If it turns out well, I will probably go back and get a couple more for Thanksgiving. So much easier than messing with a whole turkey.

This turned out very well. I have two of them brining in orange juice tonight, & will go into the smoker tomorrow morning. The in-laws always want to take some home.

These went over very well; a little too well. Twenty people showed up and no one touched my mother-in-law's 14 lb. oven bird. Red Face Also brought some homemade Char Siu and soppressata that went pretty quick, too.
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
Bought a frozen turkey breast, will smoke sometime in the future. Love them for sandwiches and cheaper than buying turkey from the deli.

Tom, what wood do you usually use on turkey? Personally, I love orange, but it can sometimes be tough to find in the PNW. You should have access to plenty of it in the Scottsdale area.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
Bought a frozen turkey breast, will smoke sometime in the future. Love them for sandwiches and cheaper than buying turkey from the deli.

Tom, what wood do you usually use on turkey? Personally, I love orange, but it can sometimes be tough to find in the PNW. You should have access to plenty of it in the Scottsdale area.

I haven't tried orange wood, usually use apple or cherry wood. I may have to look for it.
quote:
Originally posted by Lakersguy:
Prime Rib with Pecan wood!


I did a 16 lb. whole bone in standing rib roast over pecan myself for Christmas. I felt like I was in the Flintstones. Big Grin It was some tough sledding near the end as it was only -2 outside. There were no leftovers, so I guess the crowd approved.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by Lakersguy:
Prime Rib with Pecan wood!


I did a 16 lb. whole bone in standing rib roast over pecan myself for Christmas. I felt like I was in the Flintstones. Big Grin It was some tough sledding near the end as it was only -2 outside. There were no leftovers, so I guess the crowd approved.

I was joking with D that I wouldn’t be surprised if you were tending to meat and fire outside. Smile
Shorts and Jimmy Buffet shirt?
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
I was joking with D that I wouldn’t be surprised if you were tending to meat and fire outside. Smile
Shorts and Jimmy Buffet shirt?


You know me well Bill. Indeed it was shorts and a Hawaiian shirt. I did comment that it was one of the colder cooks that I can remember.
Last couple weeks:
Bone in prime rib (salt/pepper)
Pork shoulder (cider based brine then a brown sugar based rub)
Turkey breasts (2 day brine, then a rub)

Prime rib and turkey breasts were outstanding. I have yet to conquer the large pork cuts (I've had great success with brisket which I feel is more challenging).

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!

sarbuze, have you tried the trick of rubbing, then placing it in a plastic bag with a couple cups of apple cider vinegar overnight? Rub again the next morning and smoke. Tenderizes and gives it a bit more acidity.
Alternately, you can add a vinegar-based finishing sauce after pulling. I do this all the time now.
1 c. good apple cider vinegar
2 T. brown sugar
1 t. bbq seasoning or whatever rub you use
1 t. coarse ground black pepper
1 t. red pepper flakes
Warm enough to dissolve the sugar and then apply liberally to the meat; it will soak right in. Strangely, the vinegar will seem hardly present at all, but it gives the pork yet another layer of flavor.
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.

Here's my go-to recipe. This stuff gets devoured at my house:

- Get the smoker up to temp (225 - 275ish...doesn't really matter for pork). Apple or Cherry wood. Use more than you normally would.

- Prep the pork right before it goes on the smoker. Cold meat seems to yield a better smoke ring/ profile.

- Yellow mustard binder, with "Bad Byron's Butt Rub" is all I use. No injection, no brine, no AP. Keep it simple: Mustard & rub.

- Minimal trimming. I'm mainly looking for glands, veins, big fat deposits. Basically, stuff I don't want to eat.

- Set it & forget it on the smoker. I'll spritz with Apple Juice or beer every 4 hours or so, but that's it.

- DO NOT WRAP! It destroys the bark. Ride the stall (usually at 160F - 170F).

- Pull at 190F - 195F. Cover with foil & rest it in a cooler for an hour or two.

My Favorite Sauce:

This is an Eastern NC vinegar sauce. I'm pretty sure this stuff is a Schedule 1 addictive narcotic in 47 states - It's that good.

- 2 cups White Vinegar

- 2 cups Cider Vinegar

- A bunch of red pepper flakes

- A bunch of cayenne pepper (just eyeball it)

- 1/2 cup brown sugar

- Hot sauce (to taste, but a few drops of Dave's Insanity is great here)


- Bring to a slow boil, stir occasionally, then turn off the heat & cover. This stuff will keep in the fridge for a few months, and tastes better after a week or so.
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.



ha look at all the steps.

No need to over-complicate is:

I threw my pork shoulder in my slow cooker for 4 hours with some sugar/salt/spices and mixed in some liquid smoke at the end.

i dont have to even touch it and everyone loves it ;-)
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.



ha look at all the steps.

No need to over-complicate is:

I threw my pork shoulder in my slow cooker for 4 hours with some sugar/salt/spices and mixed in some liquid smoke at the end.

i dont have to even touch it and everyone loves it ;-)


G-man to the Pit of Misery. Dilly Dilly!
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.



ha look at all the steps.

No need to over-complicate is:

I threw my pork shoulder in my slow cooker for 4 hours with some sugar/salt/spices and mixed in some liquid smoke at the end.

i dont have to even touch it and everyone loves it ;-)


G-man to the Pit of Misery. Dilly Dilly!

Have to agree with Shane. Bad form.
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
Anybody ordered from Snake River Farms, Lobel's, etc? If so, what's your experience?

I just ordered a 14lb Kurabota shoulder from SRF. We'll see if it beats Costco...


i've walked into lobel's and picked up some steaks.

they were good but i honestly wouldnt pay up ever again
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
Anybody ordered from Snake River Farms, Lobel's, etc? If so, what's your experience?

I just ordered a 14lb Kurabota shoulder from SRF. We'll see if it beats Costco...

I have purchased a few things from SRF over the past couple years. The regular beef rib roasts were good, but not outstanding. Not worth the extra $ imo. Have not tried their Wagyu.
However, the Kurabota ham that I tried was probably the best ham I've ever had. So I would treat that shoulder with special care.
acutlaly if you guys have some local coop farms, i'd highly recommend seeing if you guys can share some cuts of meats with the locals.

some local heritage pork farms by me do some kunekune pigs and the meat is fantastic.

excellent breed for charcuterie.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
acutlaly if you guys have some local coop farms, i'd highly recommend seeing if you guys can share some cuts of meats with the locals.

some local heritage pork farms by me do some kunekune pigs and the meat is fantastic.

excellent breed for charcuterie.


Great idea, G-man. It looks like there's a farm near me that raises "Mangalitsa" pigs. Definitely giving them a call.
I have 3 types of bacon experiments in the smoker right now.

1. Maple--where I've used both maple sugar in the cure, and coated with maple syrup. Getting significant real maple flavor into bacon is harder than you might think. Commercial maple bacon is done thru injecting extracts and chemicals.
2. Black Forest--special set of spices used in the cure and coated before smoking.
3. Savory--lessened the sugar in the cure, and added more savory flavors like garlic, onion, black pepper, and thyme.
Using my usual combination of corn cob and cherry for smoke. We'll see how they come out. Razz
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I have 3 types of bacon experiments in the smoker right now.

1. Maple--where I've used both maple sugar in the cure, and coated with maple syrup. Getting significant real maple flavor into bacon is harder than you might think. Commercial maple bacon is done thru injecting extracts and chemicals.


maple is like bbq sauce in my opinion.

so i do is that I'll cure with maple sugar, but come smoking time, I'll smoke as low as the WSM will go. the bacon without a maple syrup coat as it makes it way too black and the bacon doesnt take the smoke. This is just for the smoke to take + the cure. Take it out after (2? hours, i can't recall exactly), lightly fork poke it through out and then cover it in warm maple syrup and seal it up in either foil or a container. if you let it rest like that, the bacon will really take the maple syrup flavor.
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
chicken wings.


Have you done this before? How long do you smoke them?


It's a regular thing at my place. 275 for 90 minutes. I like a crispy skin so I finish them for 2-3 minutes under the broiler. Perfect every time.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
bah i typed cold smoking and bacon now all the websites i'm visiting have ads related to cold smoking and bacon.

bloody heck.

I'm going to add "escorts" and "guns" just for because.


Try hookers and blow and let me know how it works out.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
bah i typed cold smoking and bacon now all the websites i'm visiting have ads related to cold smoking and bacon.

bloody heck.

I'm going to add "escorts" and "guns" just for because.


Try hookers and blow and let me know how it works out.


disney shows ??!??
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I have 3 types of bacon experiments in the smoker right now.

1. Maple--where I've used both maple sugar in the cure, and coated with maple syrup. Getting significant real maple flavor into bacon is harder than you might think. Commercial maple bacon is done thru injecting extracts and chemicals.


maple is like bbq sauce in my opinion.

so i do is that I'll cure with maple sugar, but come smoking time, I'll smoke as low as the WSM will go. the bacon without a maple syrup coat as it makes it way too black and the bacon doesnt take the smoke. This is just for the smoke to take + the cure. Take it out after (2? hours, i can't recall exactly), lightly fork poke it through out and then cover it in warm maple syrup and seal it up in either foil or a container. if you let it rest like that, the bacon will really take the maple syrup flavor.

Interesting. I'll try that next time.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
chicken wings.


Have you done this before? How long do you smoke them?


It's a regular thing at my place. 275 for 90 minutes. I like a crispy skin so I finish them for 2-3 minutes under the broiler. Perfect every time.

Same thing I do for my Buffalo sauce-injected wings. You get the flavor, but not the mess.
Not exactly BBQ but it's one of my favorites for my smoker.

I brown pork chorizo in a pan on the stove, chill it, mix it 50/50 with shredded extra sharp cheddar (I like Tilamook), stuff the mix into jalapenos, smoke them over a mix of apple & cherry wood for an hour/hour and a half at about 250 degrees.

Phenomenal with a side of sour cream.

I cut the tops off the jalapenos and use a butter knife to get all of the seeds/white stuff out of the insides to make room for the mix.

I also use a jalapeno tray I got at wally world to hold them up (works best with smaller diameter peppers). I have to put a cookie sheet underneath or it makes a terrible mess inside my smoker.

Now what I need to do is figure what type of wine goes best with them... I'm thinking of a nice auslese or maybe something Italian.
Rabbit (not wild). I'm brining it with salt, garlic, herbs and a small amount of coconut sugar. Being so lean, I'm going to try either wrapping one half in bacon or spread a layer of duck fat over it in case the other half gets dry. Any recommendations for those who have tried? I'm going around 250 for 2-2.5hrs after an 8 hour brine.
The rabbit turned out mushy. Maybe brined too long or cooked at the wrong temp.

Did my first ever pork belly on Sunday. Scored and then rubbed with paprika, black pepper, onion powder, rubbed fennel seeds into the cracks, and salt. Smoked it for 1.5hrs at 200 with apple wood, wrapped tightly in parchment paper, then foil and did another 3 hours at 200. Refrigerated until cool, cut into small portions and crisped them up in the oven. Went great with sticky rice and cold green bean salad.

A couple weeks ago I smoked a beef tenderloin wrapped in a bacon weave with a smoky bacon bourbon sauce..

This week I'm doing a smoked chinese five spice whole chicken. Currently brining. Will dry and apply a rub and smoke until 165 (thinking about using grapevine wood). Also have a vinegar/soy based five spice sauce to go with it.

VM

I did not remove the skin. The skin did not get as crispy as I would like but overall the bird was very tasty and juicy. If you want a crispier skin, you can take the chicken out of the smoker at 145 degrees and finish is in an oven for about 30 minutes at 375 degrees until is reaches 165 internal.

VM

I had that same smoker in the 2D model. The only difficult (impossible) thing to control was humidity with the tiny hole at the top. Meat, fish, chicken turned out awesome, smoking to dehydrate certain foods, jerky, chipotle chilis, etc didn't work like something like the NuVu but the price is hard to beat for what you get.

winoca posted:

I had that same smoker in the 2D model. The only difficult (impossible) thing to control was humidity with the tiny hole at the top. Meat, fish, chicken turned out awesome, smoking to dehydrate certain foods, jerky, chipotle chilis, etc didn't work like something like the NuVu but the price is hard to beat for what you get.

I found it on OfferUp for $80. Couldn't pass that up.

Pulled beef came out great, just enough smoke with only about 3 oz. of wood used.

I have a Cookshack electric smoker.  It controls the temperature for smoking and has a readout and probe for meat temperature.  Very easy to use, all stainless steel, but not cheap.  Made ribs last week for a group and got a lot of positive comments.  Very happy with it.

Treated myself to a late BDay prezzie last weekend and picked up a Primo Oval 300.  

On Saturday I fired up the grill to screaming hot and did a couple of t-bones on the direct and indirect sides.

On Sunday, I smoked a 6 pound capon which turned out beautifully.  Tender, juicy and very tasty.

I love the oval shape of the Primo and with the firebox divider, building direct/indirect sides is a breeze.  Temperature control was easy and the grill held its heat really well.

The only hard part was telling the Mrs. that I need to spend the day at home this Sunday to put the Primo through its paces smoking a brisket.  She'll forgive me in the end I'm sure.

 

thelostverse posted:
ljch1210 posted:

hey guys, which wood do you choose for your grill?

I assume you're asking about smoke wood, not a grill made out of wood.  For me, it depends on what I'm smoking.  Anything specific?

Alder for salmon. Lighter fruit woods or maple for poultry & some cuts of pork. Other pork cuts like bacon and ham call for hickory, pecan, or cherry.  For beef you can get into the heavier stuff like hickory or sometimes mesquite; many people like oak also. Once you get an idea of what you like, you can start to mix it up.

mneeley490 posted:
thelostverse posted:
ljch1210 posted:

hey guys, which wood do you choose for your grill?

I assume you're asking about smoke wood, not a grill made out of wood.  For me, it depends on what I'm smoking.  Anything specific?

Alder for salmon. Lighter fruit woods or maple for poultry & some cuts of pork. Other pork cuts like bacon and ham call for hickory, pecan, or cherry.  For beef you can get into the heavier stuff like hickory or sometimes mesquite; many people like oak also. Once you get an idea of what you like, you can start to mix it up.

thanks so much.

Brining a couple of boneless, 4.75 lb. turkey roasts in orange juice tonight, with some kosher salt, brown sugar, and thyme and rosemary sprigs from the garden. I will smoke tomorrow with orange wood until they're done, probably about 3 hours. This went over well with the in-laws last year, so I'm sure they're expecting it again. Easy slicing sure beats trying to carve around a turkey carcass.

thistlintom posted:

Was the turkey like  in Christmas Vacation?  I like fried turkey a lot but like the smoked turkey the best.  It is juicy and very flavorful.

He said it was okay, but like many of us, he is a perfectionist and was plenty sore at himself. Knowing his cellar, I'm sure the wines helped make up for it.

mneeley490 posted:

Getting up early tomorrow to load up 20 lbs. of bacon into the smoker.  Going to use a dab of mesquite along with the usual corn cob and cherry mixture this time. This will be mainly for the in-laws again for Xmas; man, I never should have started it.

 

I've never tried mesquite with bacon.  I may have to give that a try with a batch coming soon.

thelostverse posted:
mneeley490 posted:

Getting up early tomorrow to load up 20 lbs. of bacon into the smoker.  Going to use a dab of mesquite along with the usual corn cob and cherry mixture this time. This will be mainly for the in-laws again for Xmas; man, I never should have started it.

 

I've never tried mesquite with bacon.  I may have to give that a try with a batch coming soon.

I hear it's common in Texas; I don't really know. There used to be a Tex-Mex place somewhat near me that served it at breakfast. It was different, but really good.

mneeley490 posted:
thelostverse posted:
mneeley490 posted:

Getting up early tomorrow to load up 20 lbs. of bacon into the smoker.  Going to use a dab of mesquite along with the usual corn cob and cherry mixture this time. This will be mainly for the in-laws again for Xmas; man, I never should have started it.

 

I've never tried mesquite with bacon.  I may have to give that a try with a batch coming soon.

I hear it's common in Texas; I don't really know. There used to be a Tex-Mex place somewhat near me that served it at breakfast. It was different, but really good.

I wouldn't say Mesquite Smoked Bacon is wide spread here in Texas but it does exist.  H-E-B Stores are the ones where I see it most often and when I do it is typically in what we call the Hill Country.

If I smoke bacon I use Hickory.  Tried and true.

wineismylife posted:
mneeley490 posted:
thelostverse posted:
mneeley490 posted:

Getting up early tomorrow to load up 20 lbs. of bacon into the smoker.  Going to use a dab of mesquite along with the usual corn cob and cherry mixture this time. This will be mainly for the in-laws again for Xmas; man, I never should have started it.

 

I've never tried mesquite with bacon.  I may have to give that a try with a batch coming soon.

I hear it's common in Texas; I don't really know. There used to be a Tex-Mex place somewhat near me that served it at breakfast. It was different, but really good.

I wouldn't say Mesquite Smoked Bacon is wide spread here in Texas but it does exist.  H-E-B Stores are the ones where I see it most often and when I do it is typically in what we call the Hill Country.

If I smoke bacon I use Hickory.  Tried and true.

Hickory is classic, but I also enjoy apple and cherry. I am intrigued by mesquite though. I imagine a little goes a long way. 

I ended up slicing the bacon on 12/23. Threw in another 10 lbs that I had in the freezer for a total of 30, so between slicing and vacuum packaging, it took 6-1/2 hours. I had tried drying it in the fridge for a few days instead of freezing it before slicing. I heard you could get a firmer texture when it comes time to slice, but that was a bust. They went back into the freezer for a short time.

It was worth it though, when the first thing my (grown) niece and nephew asked when I walked in the door on Christmas Day, was, "Uncle Mike, did you bring any bacon!?" 

 

I have a good wino friend whose last name happens to be Bacon. Every year, he invites me and his regular wine group to a Bacon-bacon party, where everyone brings something made with bacon.  Last year I made some gluten-free, bacon-maple cupcakes with maple syrup/bacon fat-cream frosting. Sounds weird, I know, but they were the hit of the evening.

This year, the bacon-iest thing I could think of is a bacon-ized pork belly plait. I've made the belly plait before, but this time (making it up as I go) I did a week-long savory cure on the belly, after I braided it. It will go on the Weber to cook and get a little char, then cubed for appetizers. I'm basting it with a little bourbon-barrel maple syrup and soy sauce. 

Here is a link to the original belly plait:  Pork belly plait

mneeley490 posted:

I have a good wino friend whose last name happens to be Bacon. Every year, he invites me and his regular wine group to a Bacon-bacon party, where everyone brings something made with bacon.  Last year I made some gluten-free, bacon-maple cupcakes with maple syrup/bacon fat-cream frosting. Sounds weird, I know, but they were the hit of the evening.

This year, the bacon-iest thing I could think of is a bacon-ized pork belly plait. I've made the belly plait before, but this time (making it up as I go) I did a week-long savory cure on the belly, after I braided it. It will go on the Weber to cook and get a little char, then cubed for appetizers. I'm basting it with a little bourbon-barrel maple syrup and soy sauce. 

Here is a link to the original belly plait:  Pork belly plait

ok, how did it turn out?

thistlintom posted:
mneeley490 posted:

I have a good wino friend whose last name happens to be Bacon. Every year, he invites me and his regular wine group to a Bacon-bacon party, where everyone brings something made with bacon.  Last year I made some gluten-free, bacon-maple cupcakes with maple syrup/bacon fat-cream frosting. Sounds weird, I know, but they were the hit of the evening.

This year, the bacon-iest thing I could think of is a bacon-ized pork belly plait. I've made the belly plait before, but this time (making it up as I go) I did a week-long savory cure on the belly, after I braided it. It will go on the Weber to cook and get a little char, then cubed for appetizers. I'm basting it with a little bourbon-barrel maple syrup and soy sauce. 

Here is a link to the original belly plait:  Pork belly plait

ok, how did it turn out?

Not as good as I had hoped. However, due to circumstances beyond my control, I was unable to make it to the party this year, so no one was the wiser.

My Alexa said that today would be only "cloudy", so I decided to throw a 4 lb. chucky in the smoker that's been sitting overnight in a bourbon marinade. Got up at 5:30 am to fire up the smoker, only to find it snowing once again.  

So, I'm cheating by adding a little liquid smoke to the marinade, and using the oven at 225°. Still not optimal, but better than fighting the elements to keep the smoker up to temp. It's resting on a small rack above the marinade pan now. When it hits 150°, I'm going to add a bunch of chopped bell peppers, onion, & garlic to the pan and lay the meat on top. Then will foil and bring to 205° IT. Looking at pulling & making a beef & pepper mixture to top some bolillo rolls.

Chuck roast came out pretty good with the onions and peppers.

Today I'm doing a 4-1/2 lb rib roast at 250°, and using "Italian Spice" pellets for smoke. These are a specialty pellet that incorporates rosemary, thyme, and basil into the wood; great for beef. The roast is lying on a bed of vegetables and broth that will later be reduced with some red wine to make a smokey au jus. 

To those who smoke, I tried a "technique" last weekend that is supposed to yield a 5-hour pork butt. Basically, you up the cooking temp to 300°, and wrap in foil at an IT of 165°, which I do anyway. My 7 lb. pork butt took 7 hours, but that is better than the usual 10-14. After resting in towels inside a cooler for an hour, there was not much difference in flavor or texture.

I normally never vary from 225-250 cook temp except for chickens.  Chickens I'll smoke spatchcocked closer to 300-325 for an hour to 90 minutes so you get crisp instead of rubber skin.  I do wrap my brisket (Texas Crutch) when it his 160 IT to keep the moisture in.  It does accelerate the cooking for sure.

Smoked a brisket Friday night/Saturday morning.  I was only planning on smoking the point as I wanted burnt ends, but ended up smoking the whole packer.  I did, however, split the point and the flat prior to the cook and smoked them separately as an experiment.  The point and the burnt ends were excellent, but the flat ended up going over due to some timing issues unrelated to the cook.  I think next time I'll just smoke the point if I'm only looking for burnt ends, or smoke the whole packer together rather than splitting them if I want some flat.

wineismylife posted:

Inside the living room?  Man, no place around the side of the house or a garage or anything not in your living room?

Sounds strange, I know. But it is a multi-level deck, and they are very heavy and situated on an upper level, so it would've been quite a hassle to lug them down anywhere else, and then lug them back up again.  So it was better just to move them inside temporarily on a plastic tarp.  We don't use the living room all that much anyway, unless guests are over. Contractor is almost done, so I'm hoping to be back grilling by next weekend. 

I was in Costco yesterday, and they had a trimmed, prime brisket flat for the same price per pound as the untrimmed packers. Well, that was a no-brainer. Put it in the pellet smoker late last night and it's about to finish up. IT is at 192° right now, and soon it will be wrapped in foil and rest in a cooler covered in towels for a few hours. I've pulled out a couple of old Auzzie shiraz to try with it tonight.

mneeley490 posted:

I was in Costco yesterday, and they had a trimmed, prime brisket flat for the same price per pound as the untrimmed packers. Well, that was a no-brainer. Put it in the pellet smoker late last night and it's about to finish up. IT is at 192° right now, and soon it will be wrapped in foil and rest in a cooler covered in towels for a few hours. I've pulled out a couple of old Auzzie shiraz to try with it tonight.

How was it? 

thelostverse posted:
mneeley490 posted:

I was in Costco yesterday, and they had a trimmed, prime brisket flat for the same price per pound as the untrimmed packers. Well, that was a no-brainer. Put it in the pellet smoker late last night and it's about to finish up. IT is at 192° right now, and soon it will be wrapped in foil and rest in a cooler covered in towels for a few hours. I've pulled out a couple of old Auzzie shiraz to try with it tonight.

How was it? 

Brisket turned out great, the shiraz, not so much. Definitely past their prime. 

Has everybody else found smoking meats to be at higher than usual prices all season?  I've smoked one brisket this entire smoking season.  Haven't smoked a single pork shoulder or other big cut.  Prices are stupid high everywhere.  Haven't seen a single sale all summer.

Floods and the late snow in the MIdwest killed over a million head of cattle from what I heard second hand (talking with my nephew over 4th of July).  Particularly hard hit were the calf's in the cow/calf combos and cattle in Backgrounding Operations from what he said.  That would hit the supply side starting about June and running through next summer.

China's pig population has been decimated from swine flu.  That's doesn't effect us directly since little of our pork gets exported to China due to a particular growth hormone we use that's banded in China and the EU.   IT has put overall upward pressure on prices though.

I suspect though that demand has more to do with it than any supply side pressures.  'Junk' meat continues to grow in popularity.  It's great if you like chops and loins, because those are in lower demand, but what used to be junk is now in high demand.   I regularly see flank steak and flap meat at prices higher than New York and RIb Eye in the market.

thelostverse posted:
wineismylife posted:

Damn.  That's some serious beef.  Bet that took a long while.

Nice cook mneeley - I'll bet you had leftovers. 

Oh, yeah. Between 11 people, we only went thru about half of it. I cut the remaining portion in half and gave 1 part to my daughter and her family.

wineismylife posted:

Damn.  That's some serious beef.  Bet that took a long while.

Surprisingly, it only took about 4-5 hours at 220°.

 

thelostverse posted:
mneeley490 posted:

Nothing better than homemade bacon! Once you've tried it, you'll never go back to store-bought.

Absolutely.  Been making it for years now and there is no comparison.

The trick is, you have to be careful who you share it with. I wasn't, and now I'm making about 60 lbs. each Fall to supply all my friends and in-laws.  

" I regularly see flank steak and flap meat at prices higher than New York and RIb Eye in the market."

Like double this week.

So I had to buy the rib eye we're going to grill tonight. Way cheaper than the flank stake and flap meat. Weird.

Smoking some ribs tomorrow.

You guys who are doing bacon - where are you buying your meat? Are you only using pork bellies? And are you using a dedicated smoker? All I have is a Weber, which is fine for tri-tip, ribs, chickens, etc., but I have no clue when it comes to something like bacon.

I've never done it and it seems like a good project. Any other tips?

 

gregt posted:
You guys who are doing bacon - where are you buying your meat? Are you only using pork bellies? And are you using a dedicated smoker? All I have is a Weber, which is fine for tri-tip, ribs, chickens, etc., but I have no clue when it comes to something like bacon.

I've never done it and it seems like a good project. Any other tips?

 

Lots of great tips on this website: https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/

I usually smoke bellies, and they are plentiful at most Costcos, or at other wholesalers like Restaurant Depot or Smart Foodservice. You might find some with your local butcher. Every once in a while I'll make Buckboard Bacon, or BBB. You use a pork butt (shoulder) and cure and smoke in the same way as a belly. (Curing will take longer of course, due to the thickness.) 

Many people cold smoke, some hot smoke, but I prefer to warm smoke for about 12 hours at no more than 130°, so for that I use an electric.  It's trickier on a Weber, but I've known people who do it.

mneeley490 posted:
gregt posted:
You guys who are doing bacon - where are you buying your meat? Are you only using pork bellies? And are you using a dedicated smoker? All I have is a Weber, which is fine for tri-tip, ribs, chickens, etc., but I have no clue when it comes to something like bacon.

I've never done it and it seems like a good project. Any other tips?

 

Lots of great tips on this website: https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/

I usually smoke bellies, and they are plentiful at most Costcos, or at other wholesalers like Restaurant Depot or Smart Foodservice. You might find some with your local butcher. Every once in a while I'll make Buckboard Bacon, or BBB. You use a pork butt (shoulder) and cure and smoke in the same way as a belly. (Curing will take longer of course, due to the thickness.) 

Many people cold smoke, some hot smoke, but I prefer to warm smoke for about 12 hours at no more than 130°, so for that I use an electric.  It's trickier on a Weber, but I've known people who do it.

+1 to everything mneeley said.  As for smoking the belly on a Weber, that's what I routinely use.  I used to use my Weber Smokey Mountain, but I've replaced it with a charcoal Summit, and now I use that.  I used to try and keep the old one touch charcoal grill in the low 100's, but I just didn't notice any difference when I smoked at 100 or 200, or really anything less than 225. 

Take the plunge gregt, it truly makes a world of difference. 

Great site guys! For some reason I hadn't found it, even though I regularly peruse Meathead and a few others. I guess because I wasn't so focused on smoking so much as just BBQ.

Now I have the itch. I got to where I could get the Weber to maintain a temp in the low 200s for hours, so we've been eating lots of meat for the past two weeks. I'm giving it a rest for a while and then I'm going to try smoking something.

Never heard of doing pork butt as bacon, but my local guy will provide a boneless picnic roast, which I was thinking might be good because of the fat. Sounds like I have a good fall project in the works.

gregt posted:

Looks good. And I guess they're not curing it so they only leave the rub on for a few hours. But in that case, why use the pink salt?

My guess is it's a technique that pre-dates refrigeration.  IN general in Louisiana if you're Mama did it that way you keep doing.  Any variations are carpetbagging plots to destroy the culture.   Unless of course the variation taste good, then you eat it and complain it's still not how Mama did it.

csm posted:
thelostverse posted:
thistlintom posted

As a reminder for an upcoming holiday, smoked turkey is awesome

Is there any other way?

Deep Fried

I like smoked even better than deep fried.  All my in-laws seem to agree.  My m-i-l told me she's not even going to make one this year, and put it all on me. Those boneless, rolled turkey roasts from Costco are quick and easy. I brine in orange juice, and smoke with orange wood.

mneeley490 posted:
csm posted:
thelostverse posted:
thistlintom posted

As a reminder for an upcoming holiday, smoked turkey is awesome

Is there any other way?

Deep Fried

Those boneless, rolled turkey roasts from Costco are quick and easy. I brine in orange juice, and smoke with orange wood.

Can't say I've ever seen this.  I usually spatchcock a breast every year, but a boneless rolled roast sounds even better.  I'll have to look for this.

My wife usually does a small turkey in the oven because she likes the way it smells in the house, but the smoked breast always is the preferred choice by family.

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