quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
What wireless thermometer is everyone using/recommending?

That's on my list to buy this week.

Thanks


I've been using an Oregon Scientific for what feels like a decade, but she's starting to show her age, but did log a solid 16 hours this past weekend so the old girl isn't giving it up just yet.

Anyway I started my search again recently so this is a bit top of mind for me.

Most of the new contenders offer integration with your mobile device via bluetooth or wifi rather than a dedicated remote.

iGrill is a popular one, but what I'm leaning towards at the moment is a product called Tappecue. Pricy, but I like the option of wifi enabled and remote visibility for those long smokes.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I ran into a similar issue this past weekend mneeley. I put a almost 7 lb on my new smoker and we were eating it at 10:30 that night.

Starting at midnight this weekend.


for a pork butt?

what time did you start?
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I ran into a similar issue this past weekend mneeley. I put a almost 7 lb on my new smoker and we were eating it at 10:30 that night.

Starting at midnight this weekend.


for a pork butt?

what time did you start?


I put it on at 6 a.m., pulled from fridge and started smoker about 45 min earlier. @225
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I ran into a similar issue this past weekend mneeley. I put a almost 7 lb on my new smoker and we were eating it at 10:30 that night.

Starting at midnight this weekend.


for a pork butt?

what time did you start?


I put it on at 6 a.m., pulled from fridge and started smoker about 45 min earlier. @225


dannng and it was completed 16 hours later?!?!
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.


I usually go four hours and then foil. I really like to use the jus after I put it through a fat separator as a sauce. I've also used on later butts if I'm injecting.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.


I usually go four hours and then foil. I really like to use the jus after I put it through a fat separator as a sauce. I've also used on later butts if I'm injecting.


oh you put a drip pan under the meat as you're smoking?

wsm it just goes straight into the water bowl, i'd be scared to pull anything outta that water since i only rinse off the bowl as oppose to actually cleaning it thoroughly

i do use the juice that drips out from the foil though. good stuff right there!
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
What wireless thermometer is everyone using/recommending?

That's on my list to buy this week.

Thanks


I've been using the Maverick ET-733 for the last few years and am very happy with it. I actually have two in case I'm smoking several proteins at once. It is dual probe, but I like to use one probe for the temp at the cooking grate.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.


I usually go four hours and then foil. I really like to use the jus after I put it through a fat separator as a sauce. I've also used on later butts if I'm injecting.


oh you put a drip pan under the meat as you're smoking?

wsm it just goes straight into the water bowl, i'd be scared to pull anything outta that water since i only rinse off the bowl as oppose to actually cleaning it thoroughly

i do use the juice that drips out from the foil though. good stuff right there!


No, I'm talking about the juice that is retained in the foil. As for the water pan, I don't typically use water as I don't find it necessary. Instead, I normally foil the water pan so that I don't need to clean it after a cook.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


I foiled it this time, but a bit different than the norm. I left it on until it passed the stall ~170 and then put the butt in a cheap aluminum throw away pan, added some liquid (dr. pepper) and foiled over the top. -Tried a new technique...meh.

I don't typically foil any of my bbq, but may have to rethink that if I start doing more butts again. I did it on my original charcoal smoker years ago, but at the time didn't quite grasp the nuances on why I was doing it and the juices were a PIA along with losing some of the crust.

Just threw a TBone on it, well heating it up now. First time. I'm going to finish on a cast iron skillet for sear.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


I foiled it this time, but a bit different than the norm. I left it on until it passed the stall ~170 and then put the butt in a cheap aluminum throw away pan, added some liquid (dr. pepper) and foiled over the top. -Tried a new technique...meh.

I don't typically foil any of my bbq, but may have to rethink that if I start doing more butts again. I did it on my original charcoal smoker years ago, but at the time didn't quite grasp the nuances on why I was doing it and the juices were a PIA along with losing some of the crust.


i believe teh science behind it is that once you open it up from the foil, you once again will immediately go back into a stall and basically waste 2-3 hours until you get back over that hump again.
A few things:
I use a Maverick ET-732 remote thermometer, around $60; a slightly older model than the 733. It still works like a champ and I highly recommend it for overnight cooks. You can monitor meat temp and smoker temp from the comfort of your warm bed, instead of babysitting the smoker all night.

Cooking time is only an estimate. Every piece of meat is different, and cooks differently. I've had an 8 lb. pork butt take only 6 hours, and I've had one go 16, with identical smoking techniques. The ones I did Sunday never did an actual stall, but moved steadily but slowly upward. Even so, I still foiled at 165° IT, and I also save the juices to pour back onto the meat after pulling. The gravy separator is a must, as about 1/3 of it is fat. Then comes a vinegar-based finishing sauce for an extra layer of flavor.

The water bowl serves 2 purposes. It keeps the smoker environment moist on long smokes for lean cuts of meat like brisket (not necessary for fatty things like pork butt), and it acts as a heat sink to help regulate and steady the temp inside the smoker. When smoking something that doesn't need extra moisture, I fill mine with playground sand and foil the top. That way I still get the benefit of the heat sink feature.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
A few things:
I use a Maverick ET-732 remote thermometer, around $60; a slightly older model than the 733. It still works like a champ and I highly recommend it for overnight cooks. You can monitor meat temp and smoker temp from the comfort of your warm bed, instead of babysitting the smoker all night.

Cooking time is only an estimate. Every piece of meat is different, and cooks differently. I've had an 8 lb. pork butt take only 6 hours, and I've had one go 16, with identical smoking techniques. The ones I did Sunday never did an actual stall, but moved steadily but slowly upward. Even so, I still foiled at 165° IT, and I also save the juices to pour back onto the meat after pulling. The gravy separator is a must, as about 1/3 of it is fat. Then comes a vinegar-based finishing sauce for an extra layer of flavor.

The water bowl serves 2 purposes. It keeps the smoker environment moist on long smokes for lean cuts of meat like brisket (not necessary for fatty things like pork butt), and it acts as a heat sink to help regulate and steady the temp inside the smoker. When smoking something that doesn't need extra moisture, I fill mine with playground sand and foil the top. That way I still get the benefit of the heat sink feature.


Mneeley . . . would you ever consider a smoking tutorial for forumites? I don't come to Seattle often for work, but reading through many of your posts it strikes me that I and many of us could really benefit from your smoking skills and suggestions.

I feel like I have developed some pretty solid skills over the years, but when I read your posts I am reminded of how junior-league I am !!

-this is a totally serious question btw
I'm happy to give tips to anyone that wants them. But I can only tell you what I do; there are a million ways to make good bbq, and no one way is "correct".

Briskets are probably the toughest things to do well consistently. Very few people can, and they are almost all on the professional BBQ circuit. I think the trick is finding a good supplier and getting a consistent product, like Aaron Franklin does. I usually get my packers from either Cash and Carry, or Restaurant Depot. But Costco has been selling some Prime brisket packers for a pretty good price lately.
I still think one of the best I ever did was my very first one, and I've smoked dozens since.
One quick tip on brisket; it is done when you can slide a toothpick into it with little resistance. It should go in like warm butter. Internal temp for slicing should be around 195°, but again, every piece is different. And with packers, you're in it for the long haul. I've had many go over 24 hours, smoking at 225°.
quote:
Originally posted by Red guy in a blue state:
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I'm happy to give tips to anyone that wants them.


Tips, shmips. I say... BBQ and IPA offline at mneeleys. Wink

If an offline at Mneeley's with cooking tips included ever gets set up, I'll fly out with a bottle of Screaming Eagle (seriously). Would be a lot of fun and the hands-on learning would last a lifetime

That all said, agree with MNeeley's comments about brisket being different every time

This is actually the one cut of meat I've done pretty well with but it's incredibly effortful IMO. On my BGE, I have had whole packer briskets (about 11-13 pounds) go as little as 15 hours and as long as 26+. I rarely use the "Texas crutch" foil-method but that's only because I am still experimenting and trying to learn through doing. Greatest difficulty for me is trying to maintain a consistent temp (within ~25 or so degrees) on the BGE. I use the Maverick dual thermometer and have on probe in the brisket (shooting for anywhere between 190 - 203 depending on what I am going to do with the brisket) and one probe hovering ~1 inch above the grates. I have the grate thermometer alarm whenever the temp goes below 205 or above 250. The results in maintaining this stable temp are always great but makes for some horrible interruptions to my sleep . . . and my wife now makes me sleep in the basement if I am going to have the grill alarm going through the night!

PH


In! Cool
Well after many years of running a smoker I did my first overnight smoke Friday night. I put a pair of 9 lb. butts on at 9 pm and took them off at 1 pm the following day. They held temp in a cooler until we pulled them for dinner and man they turned out good.

Ended up doing pulled pork tacos on corn tortillas. Excellent all the way around.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Well after many years of running a smoker I did my first overnight smoke Friday night. I put a pair of 9 lb. butts on at 9 pm and took them off at 1 pm the following day. They held temp in a cooler until we pulled them for dinner and man they turned out good.

Ended up doing pulled pork tacos on corn tortillas. Excellent all the way around.

Cool Love pulled pork tacos.
Tonight I'm using some of the pulled pork from earlier and trying out a recipe for Bitterballen. Sort of a Dutch croquette.
Cooks illustrated has a great recipe for smoked pork loin this month

Pretty basic recipe:

Overnight dry brine in a 2:1 light brown sugar/kosher salt rub. Cook at 300 degrees on whatever grill you like with some type of non-mesquite wood (I used hickory). Done!
(I tweaked by cooking at 250 to an internal temp of 131 -and not the 140 CI suggested- and then seared on a searing hot grill for a total of 2 minutes bringing internal temp to ~135)

They have a nice chutney recipe to go along with it

Made some Cuban sandwiches with the left-overs today, again courtesy of a Cooks-illustrated suggestion
I've been using the smoker for about a year. Love it, but I'm still a newb. Overnight last night I did brisket for the 2nd time. I was surprised both times about how quickly they were done. The first full brisket was 13 lbs and this one was 15 lbs, both before trimming fat. Both were done in about 10 hours with the temp in the WSM around 230-250 the whole time. I would have expected it to take a lot longer.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
do you guys wet brine or dry brine?

been hearing from folks there's really no point in wet brining anymore

I would say it depends on what you're brining, and your level of expertise, or comfort level. Also, are we talking about brining or curing? There is a big difference.
I wet brine chicken for a few hours, and turkeys up to 2 days. But if you're curing something like bacon, it can be done either wet or dry.
I've done both, but I still use a fool-proof wet cure for bacon and always get good results. I also like the texture of the finished product a little more, but many people swear by dry. However, imo, working with nitrites (cure) in dry brining is generally not for first timers. You need to pay close attention to weights and percentages. Too little, and your bacon can grow toxics and kill you. Too much, and you can die from nitrite poisoning. You need some experience to know what's "just right".
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
do you guys wet brine or dry brine?

been hearing from folks there's really no point in wet brining anymore


Both, I think wet works best for fowl and salmon. I prefer dry for beef and pork. Every time I dry-brine salmon it is too salty for me.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
do you guys wet brine or dry brine?

been hearing from folks there's really no point in wet brining anymore


So, I'm going to speak to brining only and not curing. Other than using Prague Powder in very small quantities using a time-tested recipe with very exacting quantities for a week long brisket brine (to make corned beef or pastrami), I have not touched curing for the reasons Mneeley mentioned. I do not feel like I know enough about how to do this properly for uncooked meats to do it safely.

That said, here goes:
-Fish: wet brine in a 3% salt solution for 15 and no more than 30 minutes
-Chicken / Turkey: Used to wet brine, but I have found that dry brining produces what is to my palate similar results without the space and time requirements of wet brining. For chicken I rub the chicken with ~3% salt by total bird weight and let this dry brine in the fridge for at least 2 hours and preferably overnight. For Turkey I like to get this dry brine on for at least 1 day and preferably 2
-Beef/pork/lamb/duck: dry brine with salt (again ~3% by meat weight) for at least 1 hour and up to overnight
-Pork: sometimes I dry brine with a 2/3rd to 1/3rd brine of brown sugar and salt again trying to ensure that total salt does not exceed 3-5% of total pork weight. In this instance, I wrap the pork tightly in plastic wrap while brining (or will vacuum seal if I have the time) to prevent all the moisture from just spilling on the plate holding the meat

There are some pretty good articles on wet vs. dry brining on seriouseats.com and on amazingribs.com

I do think that ultimately your preferred method will depend on your tastes and the different textures these different approaches may produce for you
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
do you guys wet brine or dry brine?

been hearing from folks there's really no point in wet brining anymore

I would say it depends on what you're brining, and your level of expertise, or comfort level. Also, are we talking about brining or curing? There is a big difference.
I wet brine chicken for a few hours, and turkeys up to 2 days. But if you're curing something like bacon, it can be done either wet or dry.
I've done both, but I still use a fool-proof wet cure for bacon and always get good results. I also like the texture of the finished product a little more, but many people swear by dry. However, imo, working with nitrites (cure) in dry brining is generally not for first timers. You need to pay close attention to weights and percentages. Too little, and your bacon can grow toxics and kill you. Too much, and you can die from nitrite poisoning. You need some experience to know what's "just right".


only talking about brining

been curing for the past 2 years and havne't killed myself yet ;-)

the idea is, wet brine you waste alot of water and salt and space in the fridge

dry brine you just slap it on, wrap in paper towel, let it come to room temp and put it down to the smoker.

was curious about people's experiences

I think i'm in agreement with galvezguy, I'm just not good at dry-brining salmon, comes out way too salty

looks like teh lowest published lethal dose of sodium nitrite is 71mg/kg . so fat person like me needs 6.4gs of immediate consumption before it'd kill me =)
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
only talking about brining

been curing for the past 2 years and havne't killed myself yet ;-)

the idea is, wet brine you waste alot of water and salt and space in the fridge
This is true. I've outgrown my mini beer fridge, and am looking at buying a used, full size for the garage, if I can ever clear enough space.

dry brine you just slap it on, wrap in paper towel, let it come to room temp and put it down to the smoker.

was curious about people's experiences

I think i'm in agreement with galvezguy, I'm just not good at dry-brining salmon, comes out way too salty Also true with me. I've had many people rave over my smoked salmon, but it never seems quite right to me. I like a harder, sweeter version, as opposed to something like lox. Sometimes called squaw candy around here.

looks like teh lowest published lethal dose of sodium nitrite is 71mg/kg . so fat person like me needs 6.4gs of immediate consumption before it'd kill me =)
~7.5 lb pork shoulder just went on with apple wood, will brush every 45 mins with an apple cider vinegar based liquid, for pulled pork tonight

Plan on brining to ~195, which apparently is best for making the pork pull easily. Any other advice is appreciated, have about 8 hours to make adjustments Smile
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
~7.5 lb pork shoulder just went on with apple wood, will brush every 45 mins with an apple cider vinegar based liquid, for pulled pork tonight

Plan on brining to ~195, which apparently is best for making the pork pull easily. Any other advice is appreciated, have about 8 hours to make adjustments Smile


opening the wsm every 45 minutes will have you hitting the stall for alot longer.

i'd highly recommend injecting the pork shoulder with your liquid then covering it and just walk away for a few hours

or, texas crutch it.

the science behind it is that the meat sweats as you cook it. like when a person sweats, it cools off the temperature of the meat. you'd need the humidity of the WSM to match the liquid on the meat otherwise you'd hit the stall (a very long one too if you're just opening and letting humidity out every 45 minutes)
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
~7.5 lb pork shoulder just went on with apple wood, will brush every 45 mins with an apple cider vinegar based liquid, for pulled pork tonight

Plan on brining to ~195, which apparently is best for making the pork pull easily. Any other advice is appreciated, have about 8 hours to make adjustments Smile


I have terrible luck trying to get my butts to cook at an hour a pound. I do something similar, but baste every hour. It's easier for me to keep track if it's the same time every hour. I prefer a spray bottle to a mop/brush, but in the end they both work.
Keep the tin foil wrap trick in mind if you think you are going to overshoot the mark by several hours as in, if you aren't at 160º AT LEAST three hours before you want to eat I'd start contingency planning. 195 is a good minimum and all the way up to 205 doesn't hurt either.

Enjoy. I'm sure it will be fantastic
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
~7.5 lb pork shoulder just went on with apple wood, will brush every 45 mins with an apple cider vinegar based liquid, for pulled pork tonight

Plan on brining to ~195, which apparently is best for making the pork pull easily. Any other advice is appreciated, have about 8 hours to make adjustments Smile


opening the wsm every 45 minutes will have you hitting the stall for alot longer.



I never start spritzing until after the three hour mark, and then only if the bark is set. If you spray or mop before bark set, the crust, rub and the all important Maillard reaction will fall off when you foil. I almost always foil - don't give me any of your Texas crutch crap. Razz

Once I put the pork butt on the smoker, I don't open the lid for three hours. If the bark is set sufficiently at that point, I will spritz every hour until I hit the stall. Once it hits the stall, I foil with some liquid (apple juice or beer or whatever is on hand), and let it go to 195 before I start checking for probe tender. BBQ is done when it's done - don't get caught up in x/lbs per hour. Once it is probe tender (be it 195 or 205), I take it off the smoker and open the foil to stop the cooking. Once the temp gets back down to 170 or so, I'll pull if eating soon, or seal in the foil to hold until pulling later. Once I've pulled the butt from the smoker, I pour off the liquid from the foil and de-fat it, using the au jus if necessary in the pulled product. I've also frozen the remaining au jus to use for injection on the next butt, but I don't always inject.
Turned out good, had a few bites of great, but overall not exceptional (though we enjoyed it).

I hit ~190 and we pulled it. 1/2 of it was perfectly tender, fall apart in your hands. The other 1/2 needed that extra hour or two to get to ~200, but we were hungry Smile

I think I would have hit the temp, without foil, had I let it go. That said, I will try the foil method next go at it and will probably use a version of the method posted by thelostverse for fun.

Most importantly, wife loved it! I did mention to her that there was much to improve and we'll have to experiment with it often, which she supports.

I look forward to continuing to learn from those of you who have been doing this a long time, even gman
i wont take mine off until they hit 205f these days - i find pulling at 195 leaves them a bit too 'held together(?)' - not tough, but but not that awesome fall apart if you give a dirty look glistening with glycerin I really like in my shoulder. I have never foiled, but that's on a BGE.
I have always shot for 203 (rec from amazingribs for brisket but works great for pork shoulder as well).

Like Snipes said, I don't think I've ever been able to hit temp at an average of 1 hour per pound. Last 10 pound pork butt I cooked took almost 18 hours
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:

I never start spritzing until after the three hour mark, and then only if the bark is set. If you spray or mop before bark set, the crust, rub and the all important Maillard reaction will fall off when you foil. I almost always foil - don't give me any of your Texas crutch crap. Razz

Once I put the pork butt on the smoker, I don't open the lid for three hours. If the bark is set sufficiently at that point, I will spritz every hour until I hit the stall. Once it hits the stall, I foil with some liquid (apple juice or beer or whatever is on hand), and let it go to 195 before I start checking for probe tender. BBQ is done when it's done - don't get caught up in x/lbs per hour. Once it is probe tender (be it 195 or 205), I take it off the smoker and open the foil to stop the cooking. Once the temp gets back down to 170 or so, I'll pull if eating soon, or seal in the foil to hold until pulling later. Once I've pulled the butt from the smoker, I pour off the liquid from the foil and de-fat it, using the au jus if necessary in the pulled product. I've also frozen the remaining au jus to use for injection on the next butt, but I don't always inject.

That's very close to what I do. Pork butt is the most forgiving cut there is. It's hard to screw it up too badly. I usually go with injection though, so I don't have to be opening up the smoker and losing heat and time, and take it to 205°.
"If you're lookin', you ain't cookin'."
Doing my first beef brisket tomorrow. Reading up on techniques. I'm not a texas crutch guy, but will do it on this thing.

Unsure exactly what I have, as the in-laws brought it with them yesterday. It's 6 1/2 lbs. and part of a butchered half a cow they purchased.

That size is right in the window between start before bed or first thing in the a.m.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I'm not a texas crutch guy



I never quite understand why people are anti-foil/butcher paper. To me, it's merely a tool that makes most BBQ taste better. It also happens to speed up the cooking time on some things, but if I'm BBQ'ing, I'm never in a hurry anyway.

I'm not specifically talking about you here snipes, your post just happened to catch my attention this morning. Good luck with the brisket - I'm still struggling with that particular cut myself.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I'm not a texas crutch guy



I never quite understand why people are anti-foil/butcher paper. To me, it's merely a tool that makes most BBQ taste better. It also happens to speed up the cooking time on some things, but if I'm BBQ'ing, I'm never in a hurry anyway.

I'm not specifically talking about you here snipes, your post just happened to catch my attention this morning. Good luck with the brisket - I'm still struggling with that particular cut myself.


I foil when I do ribs and brisket only. I understand why some don't like it because I've found that if you leave the meat in the foil too long the meat gets mushy like it does when it's parboiled before being smoked, and falls of the bone when doing ribs, neither of which you want.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Doing my first beef brisket tomorrow. Reading up on techniques. I'm not a texas crutch guy, but will do it on this thing.

Unsure exactly what I have, as the in-laws brought it with them yesterday. It's 6 1/2 lbs. and part of a butchered half a cow they purchased.

That size is right in the window between start before bed or first thing in the a.m.


That is probably just the flat then. We had it with a fourth of a cow we purchased. It was fine, but cooked pretty quickly - I want to say it was done in like 6 hours - and I remember scrambling to figure out how to keep it warm until we were ready to eat.
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I'm not a texas crutch guy



I never quite understand why people are anti-foil/butcher paper. To me, it's merely a tool that makes most BBQ taste better. It also happens to speed up the cooking time on some things, but if I'm BBQ'ing, I'm never in a hurry anyway.

I'm not specifically talking about you here snipes, your post just happened to catch my attention this morning. Good luck with the brisket - I'm still struggling with that particular cut myself.


if you leave the meat in the foil too long the meat gets mushy like it does when it's parboiled before being smoked, and falls of the bone when doing ribs, neither of which you want.


I'm in full agreement on mushy meat or ribs falling off the bone. But if that happens, it's not the foil's fault - that's just overcooking the protein. It's done when it's done - not at a certain preconceived time.
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
and I remember scrambling to figure out how to keep it warm until we were ready to eat.


A finished brisket will hold for hours if you wrap it in foil after finished cooking (let the temp come down to about 170* to stop the carryover before wrapping it in foil), wrap it in several towels, and hold it in an empty cooler.
I did a whole duck on NYE. Marinated overnight with some Asian inspired flavors plus a little coarse mustard. Next day did a wet rub with salt, pepper, honey, coarse mustard, and a few other things.

Started at around 275 in the smoker (an hour or so) then brought i back down to 235 or so. It went for ~4 hours, and turned out with a ridiculously crisp skin and moist inside. Two in the group who dont "love duck because it's too fatty" really enjoyed it as a lot of the fat rendered out and it was just really good tasting duck meat and skin.

Will do another one soon playing around with dry rubs.

I tend to not use recipes and this time it worked out well.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
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Originally posted by CSM:
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Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I'm not a texas crutch guy



I never quite understand why people are anti-foil/butcher paper. To me, it's merely a tool that makes most BBQ taste better. It also happens to speed up the cooking time on some things, but if I'm BBQ'ing, I'm never in a hurry anyway.

I'm not specifically talking about you here snipes, your post just happened to catch my attention this morning. Good luck with the brisket - I'm still struggling with that particular cut myself.


if you leave the meat in the foil too long the meat gets mushy like it does when it's parboiled before being smoked, and falls of the bone when doing ribs, neither of which you want.


I'm in full agreement on mushy meat or ribs falling off the bone. But if that happens, it's not the foil's fault - that's just overcooking the protein. It's done when it's done - not at a certain preconceived time.


True, but my point was it makes it harder to monitor. You have to be very precise with foil. It can go from perfect to overdone in an instant.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
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Originally posted by aphilla:
and I remember scrambling to figure out how to keep it warm until we were ready to eat.


A finished brisket will hold for hours if you wrap it in foil after finished cooking (let the temp come down to about 170* to stop the carryover before wrapping it in foil), wrap it in several towels, and hold it in an empty cooler.


Yeah. I did this with a full packer brisket that also got done a lot quicker than I thought. I left it in the butcher paper (I wrap it half way through the cook), and wrapped those in towels, and set them in an empty cooler. Five hours later it was still too hot to handle.
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
and I remember scrambling to figure out how to keep it warm until we were ready to eat.


A finished brisket will hold for hours if you wrap it in foil after finished cooking (let the temp come down to about 170* to stop the carryover before wrapping it in foil), wrap it in several towels, and hold it in an empty cooler.


Yeah. I did this with a full packer brisket that also got done a lot quicker than I thought. I left it in the butcher paper (I wrap it half way through the cook), and wrapped those in towels, and set them in an empty cooler. Five hours later it was still too hot to handle.

+1
Briskets are funny things. No two cook exactly alike. Most full packers I've done took between 16-25 hours. One shocked me when it was done in 8 hours. Since it was done so early, it threw my dinner timing off, so I wrapped in towels and placed it in the cooler. 12 hours later, it was still hot and perfect.
Smoked a small (5 lb or so) brisket today for the Packers game. Was done in 5ish hours with no stall whatsoever, so it was done way earlier than I expected. Blankets and foil and a cooler and it was still hot and ready to eat 3 hours later.
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Has anybody finished brisket in the oven after starting it on the smoker? I've done that with pork butt (first 5 hours on smoker, rest in oven) and am wondering about doing it with the brisket.


Pretty sure that's a felony in 37 states. Razz
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Has anybody finished brisket in the oven after starting it on the smoker? I've done that with pork butt (first 5 hours on smoker, rest in oven) and am wondering about doing it with the brisket.


I have a couple of times when I've run out of fuel or just don't feel like adding more for a short time. Heat is heat. I know of several people that will take a brisket off the smoker after four or five hours and if the bark has set. A protein will only take smoke for so long. After that, the BBQ smells good, but the brisket is not getting anymore smoke. Pop it in the oven and finish it off at the temp you would have used on the smoker.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Has anybody finished brisket in the oven after starting it on the smoker? I've done that with pork butt (first 5 hours on smoker, rest in oven) and am wondering about doing it with the brisket.


I have a couple of times when I've run out of fuel or just don't feel like adding more for a short time. Heat is heat. I know of several people that will take a brisket off the smoker after four or five hours and if the bark has set. A protein will only take smoke for so long. After that, the BBQ smells good, but the brisket is not getting anymore smoke. Pop it in the oven and finish it off at the temp you would have used on the smoker.


I imagine that would be the case - glad to hear someone has experienced it. Right now I don't want to be slogging around outside in the mud that used to be my lawn more than I have to, so may give it a try.
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Has anybody finished brisket in the oven after starting it on the smoker? I've done that with pork butt (first 5 hours on smoker, rest in oven) and am wondering about doing it with the brisket.


Pretty sure that's a felony in 37 states. Razz


Shhhhhhhhh
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Has anybody finished brisket in the oven after starting it on the smoker? I've done that with pork butt (first 5 hours on smoker, rest in oven) and am wondering about doing it with the brisket.


Pretty sure that's a felony in 37 states. Razz


Only Texas. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
Has anybody finished brisket in the oven after starting it on the smoker? I've done that with pork butt (first 5 hours on smoker, rest in oven) and am wondering about doing it with the brisket.


I have a couple of times when I've run out of fuel or just don't feel like adding more for a short time. Heat is heat. I know of several people that will take a brisket off the smoker after four or five hours and if the bark has set. A protein will only take smoke for so long. After that, the BBQ smells good, but the brisket is not getting anymore smoke. Pop it in the oven and finish it off at the temp you would have used on the smoker.


I imagine that would be the case - glad to hear someone has experienced it. Right now I don't want to be slogging around outside in the mud that used to be my lawn more than I have to, so may give it a try.

If you subscribe to the "Texas crutch" style of smoking brisket, then it's all the more justification for taking the brisket out of the smoker and finishing it in an oven. Here's a somewhat dense analysis of a couple Texas crutch styles versus "naked":

http://www.genuineideas.com/Ar...Index/thecrutch.html

Logically (unless you think that smoke can readily penetrate aluminum foil) if you use the Texas crutch method, then there's little difference between continued heat coming from a smoker versus a conventional oven to finish off your brisket.
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:

If you subscribe to the "Texas crutch" style of smoking brisket, then it's all the more justification for taking the brisket out of the smoker and finishing it in an oven. Here's a somewhat dense analysis of a couple Texas crutch styles versus "naked":

http://www.genuineideas.com/Ar...Index/thecrutch.html

Logically (unless you think that smoke can readily penetrate aluminum foil) if you use the Texas crutch method, then there's little difference between continued heat coming from a smoker versus a conventional oven to finish off your brisket.


Neat article. I'll have to read it when I'm not light headed from painkillers.

I wrap in butcher paper after about 6 hours, so I guess that would be a logical time to bring it in....
I've done it all. Stayed up all night to babysit the charcoal horizontal smoker, even with snow on the ground. Swapped out propane tanks when it ran out in the middle of the night in my gasser. And at some point I got smart(er) and bought a remote thermometer with an alarm, so I could keep tabs on both the meat and smoker temp in my electric fridge conversion, from the comfort of my warm bed. Now, if it's not done by the time I get up, it goes into the oven for the last few hours. Usually wrapped in foil or butcher paper.
The brisket turned out really well. I *think* I could have left it on a little more - the points were great but the flat could have been a little easier to pull apart. I guess I'll get to a point where I can tell easily when to pull them off.

It got 6 hours of smoke in a 13 hour cook, and finished in butcher paper in the oven.

Now, what are your top suggestions about what to do with leftovers? We served 7 and still have a bunch of brisket left.
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
The brisket turned out really well. I *think* I could have left it on a little more - the points were great but the flat could have been a little easier to pull apart. I guess I'll get to a point where I can tell easily when to pull them off.
Toothpick test. It's perfect when you can slide a toothpick into it, and it feels like warm butter.

Now, what are your top suggestions about what to do with leftovers? We served 7 and still have a bunch of brisket left.
Mine usually start out at 15-18 lbs, so I have lots of leftovers, too. Hash is good, so is chili.

LOL, Thistlin Tom beat me to it.
I am smoking a delicious loin of albacore, which will be spice and brown sugar rubbed, and smoked for 2.5 hours, removed, and "pulled", much like, pulled pork.

With this, I create a wonderfully delicious smoked albacore taco. Served atop my fluffy homemade tortillas, is a refreshing and colourful cabbage, spring onion and green apple slaw, a healthy serving of the smoked albacore. Finally, a sweet and spicy mango habanero sauce is drizzled atop for a refreshing, delightful Sonoma afternoon, al-fresco lunch, absolutely! I trust you will follow my lead and prepare this dish for yourselves, with due reverence!

Cheers!
~W&FE~
quote:
Originally posted by Wine and Food Expert:
I am smoking a delicious loin of albacore, which will be spice and brown sugar rubbed, and smoked for 2.5 hours, removed, and "pulled", much like, pulled pork.

With this, I create a wonderfully delicious smoked albacore taco. Served atop my fluffy homemade tortillas, is a refreshing and colourful cabbage, spring onion and green apple slaw, a healthy serving of the smoked albacore. Finally, a sweet and spicy mango habanero sauce is drizzled atop for a refreshing, delightful Sonoma afternoon, al-fresco lunch, absolutely! I trust you will follow my lead and prepare this dish for yourselves, with due reverence!

Cheers!
~W&FE~


i expect more from you. please tell me you rode a manta ray bareback to the cocos islands where you hand-wrestled a world-record albacore in a kelp forest... or smoked it with the dried petals of atamcama desert rose that bloom, well, not necessarily every year....

otherwise i had these at some parkdale hipster taco joint for lunch the other day and they were kind of menh... with a few micheladas absolutely!

i will assume this is a one off slip. I continue to hold you to a higher standard of entertainment.
quote:


otherwise i had these at some parkdale hipster taco joint for lunch the other day and they were kind of menh... with a few micheladas absolutely!


I had the nearly exact same tacos at a smoked fish taco joint in Cayucos that I go to when I'm in town. I mean, about exactly the same ingredients except for a few substitutions.

I'm attempting my first brisket of 2017 this weekend using the Franklin method I watched on YouTube. Only the flat and no point so I'll save some $$ if it's a failure.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:


I'm attempting my first brisket of 2017 this weekend using the Franklin method I watched on YouTube. Only the flat and no point so I'll save some $$ if it's a failure.


It's going to be awesome. What do you mean by "Franklin method?" Wrapping in butcher paper at some point?
Used the Franklin method today to smoke an 8lb brisket on the BGE. Used mostly oak chunks but also a bit of hickory. I have always been an unabashed foil guy but those days are behind me and I'm now going to use exclusively butcher paper. The texture is just better and I found the brisket to have more moisture, even after 3 or so hours in the cooler, than I do with foil.
The brisket flavor was spot on (this was only the flat, no point). Peppery, all around bark, smoky, beefy with a nice little rendered fat layer on top. The whole pull test thing was also good and the meat was nice and tender. However, it was slightly on the dry side, and could use some improvement. I had a small water container below the brisket and sprayed it once with cider vinegar. The temp was maintained at 250 the entire time and I used lump charcoal (oak and hickory) with a few nice chunks of red oak. I wrapped it when it hit just under 170 and pulled it at 203. Any tips? More spraying? Bigger water bath? I'd say it was about 85% on target and I'm pretty happy with that result since I'm a bit new to this.
They all cook differently. I might have sprayed it a couple more times, as the flat is much leaner than the point, but that's all. Sometimes you can do everything right, and it will still turn out a little dry. Blame it on the cow.
What kind of bbq or smoker are you using?
Decided on brisket for the Superbowl, so fired up a 14 lb. packer on Saturday night. The meat hit the rack at about 9 PM and went through the night. Temps were in the 20's overnight so I figured the smoker might need some tending. The Weber Smokey Mountain usually finds it's temp and will run pretty smoothly, but I was fighting it most of the night due to the outside temp. Anyway, the low temp alarm woke me at 5 AM, and rather than fight the smoker, I moved the brisket into the oven for the rest of the cook.

It was the best brisket I've ever done and the burnt ends were fantastic. Brisket has been my nemesis, but usually because I run out of patience as everyone is hungry for dinner. I waited this one out and everybody was happy.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
They all cook differently. I might have sprayed it a couple more times, as the flat is much leaner than the point, but that's all. Sometimes you can do everything right, and it will still turn out a little dry. Blame it on the cow.
What kind of bbq or smoker are you using?


I was using Black Angus beef (choice) and a medium size Big Green Egg.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
Decided on brisket for the Superbowl, so fired up a 14 lb. packer on Saturday night. The meat hit the rack at about 9 PM and went through the night. Temps were in the 20's overnight so I figured the smoker might need some tending. The Weber Smokey Mountain usually finds it's temp and will run pretty smoothly, but I was fighting it most of the night due to the outside temp.


What do you use for fuel? I tried a few different versions of lump charcoal in my WSM and all of them make it hard for me to stabilize the temp for a long period. I have started using Kingsford "professional" or something like that. It keeps a stable temp for a long time, but it gives off a mighty awful smell when it ignites so i have to let it burn awhile before I put it in the WSM.

I'm still looking for the perfect fuel.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
They all cook differently. I might have sprayed it a couple more times, as the flat is much leaner than the point, but that's all. Sometimes you can do everything right, and it will still turn out a little dry. Blame it on the cow.
What kind of bbq or smoker are you using?


I was using Black Angus beef (choice) and a medium size Big Green Egg.

Dunno. That's the one type of smoker that I don't have any experience with. Been looking at a couple of knock-offs recently, but I'm not sure how well the wife would react if I brought yet another smoker home.
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:

What do you use for fuel?


I use the Kingsford Original most of the time. I find it very reliable and generally have no issues. I knew with the cold temps I might have some problems, but nothing I can't handle with a few adjustments. The bigger issue not mentioned in my original post was the wind. Fairly strong and gusting winds out of the Northeast. This is definitely not the prevailing winds for my deck - I should have closed the vent facing the wind and adjusted the other two vents to compensate.

I had plenty of fuel left when I moved to the oven, I just didn't feel like messing with it at 5 AM when I was still mostly asleep. I chucked it in the oven and went back to sleep.

Weber has just released a new briquette, but I haven't tried it yet. I will soon.
I put on a pork butt this morning. I moved it to the oven at 6 hours and put a side of salmon on the smoker. The salmon is done and my wife says it is delicious (I am not a fan). The butt is still cooking - looking forward to pulled pork this evening.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
They all cook differently. I might have sprayed it a couple more times, as the flat is much leaner than the point, but that's all. Sometimes you can do everything right, and it will still turn out a little dry. Blame it on the cow.
What kind of bbq or smoker are you using?


I was using Black Angus beef (choice) and a medium size Big Green Egg.


I feel your pain. Every flat-only smoke I did on my BGE turned out a little dry-ish. Just not a ton of fat on that meat to stand up to what ultimately is a very dry heat (even if you have a water pan underneath).

Due to time constraints, I purchased a pellet smoker last year and have not run into the same problem. But, now, I try to buy either full briskets or at least briskets with some portion of the point end on it so that I can use the fat cap to moisturize the meat during a long smoke

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