Speaking of Bacon . . . anyone have thoughts about the safety of making bacon and cold smoking?

I check in on the website amazingribs.com often and the guy that runs that website very strongly cautions against home cooks making their own bacon. I'm assuming if you use an adequate amount of Prague powder, you are avoiding potential contamination, but has not been a theory I have felt confident testing
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Speaking of Bacon . . . anyone have thoughts about the safety of making bacon and cold smoking?

I check in on the website amazingribs.com often and the guy that runs that website very strongly cautions against home cooks making their own bacon. I'm assuming if you use an adequate amount of Prague powder, you are avoiding potential contamination, but has not been a theory I have felt confident testing

Sorry, but IMO and the opinion of many other smokers that I am in contact with, the guy that runs the amazingribs.com website doesn't know he's talking about. On many subjects.

I've made 100's of lbs. of bacon. Hot, warm, and cold smoked. Once the meat is cured, it is pretty durable. There will never be a problem, as long as you follow a few simple rules.
First off, make sure your bacon is thoroughly cured. You can do a straight salt cure, like in some of the charcuterie books I've read, but I wouldn't recommend it. Use Prague powder/pink salt (not Himalayan)/cure #1; it's all the same thing. (Morton's Tenderquick is something altogether different, having regular salt and other stuff already blended in. I don't care for it, and you can't use it as a substitute in brining formula calculations.)
For dry curing, the formula is .25% cure #1 and 2%-3% each salt and sugar, by weight of the meat. It will penetrate 1/4" per side, per day, plus two more days to make sure equilibrium is reached. Brining time should actually be 2+ weeks for the sugar to take effect. It is a large molecule and doesn't penetrate the meat as fast as salt. The meat will have a salty flavor with shorter curing times.

For wet curing (which is what I do, as it is as foolproof as you can get.)
Per gallon of cold water:
1 T. cure #1
1/3 c. to 1 cup sea salt ( I use just over 1/3 cup for low sodium bacon. If done properly, you won't miss the salt.)
1/2 c. white sugar
1 c. brown sugar
Usually do 2 weeks, but I have let it go as long as 3 (when something else came up), and once equilibrium is reached, it will not absorb any more cure or salt.

As for the cold smoking, it is best done in cooler temps in the Fall or Spring, with the smoker between 40°F to 70°F. Any colder, and condensation will form on the meat and ruin the smoke. Any warmer, and you begin to change the texture of the finished product. I have cold smoked bacon for 8 hours a day, for 3 days, putting it back in the fridge each night. But I know some who smoke every day, up to a week. It depends on what kind of wood you're using as well. For my 3-day, I used a light peach wood. Truthfully, it could have gone a couple more days. But if you're using something heavier like hickory, you need to adjust accordingly. It's all a matter of personal preference.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Found a 4.75 lb. frozen Butterball turkey breast roast at Costco the other day for about $13. It's in the smoker now at 275°, with some rub and injected with garlic butter. Using orange wood for smoke; I really like orange with poultry. If it turns out well, I will probably go back and get a couple more for Thanksgiving. So much easier than messing with a whole turkey.

This turned out very well. I have two of them brining in orange juice tonight, & will go into the smoker tomorrow morning. The in-laws always want to take some home.
Being as it is that I am, the "very best of show" in the pit, I am taking the honours of smoking the turkey this holiday. It's nearly finished, and will be resting for several hours. Injecting is for amateurs and the BBQ competition circuit Roll Eyes I am also cold smoking a side of wild salmon, after which I had cured it with salt, sugar and my Award Winning proprietary blend of herbs and spices. A prime rib roast will also be on the table, carefully slow cooked in my wood burning oven, thank you very much.

Cheers!
~W&FE~
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Wine and Food Expert:
Injecting is for amateurs and the BBQ competition circuit Roll Eyes

You would not think so if you were ever to have the privilege of trying my pulled pork, .


Pulled pork, should be, simple, rubbed and cooked slow, low, absolutely! My proprietary dry rub with salt, pepper, paprika, onion and garlic powder has won the world over and influenced some of the great Pit Masters of the BBQ world, mind you. I have signed multiple NDS for my services and cannot divulge their information. However, I smoke the pork on my homemade (I am, a self-taught welder, mind you again) smoker, sustained at 275 degrees. 6 hours later, I begin spraying with a 50/50 blend of my home made apple cidre vinegar and juice from my Pink Lady apples, directly from my Estate orchard, obviously!. Wrap in foil when the bark is "perfect" and cook to doneness, if you know what that is Roll Eyes . I trust you will use my method and never turn back, truthfully.
Cheers!
~W&FE~
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Found a 4.75 lb. frozen Butterball turkey breast roast at Costco the other day for about $13. It's in the smoker now at 275°, with some rub and injected with garlic butter. Using orange wood for smoke; I really like orange with poultry. If it turns out well, I will probably go back and get a couple more for Thanksgiving. So much easier than messing with a whole turkey.

This turned out very well. I have two of them brining in orange juice tonight, & will go into the smoker tomorrow morning. The in-laws always want to take some home.

These went over very well; a little too well. Twenty people showed up and no one touched my mother-in-law's 14 lb. oven bird. Red Face Also brought some homemade Char Siu and soppressata that went pretty quick, too.
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
Bought a frozen turkey breast, will smoke sometime in the future. Love them for sandwiches and cheaper than buying turkey from the deli.

Tom, what wood do you usually use on turkey? Personally, I love orange, but it can sometimes be tough to find in the PNW. You should have access to plenty of it in the Scottsdale area.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
Bought a frozen turkey breast, will smoke sometime in the future. Love them for sandwiches and cheaper than buying turkey from the deli.

Tom, what wood do you usually use on turkey? Personally, I love orange, but it can sometimes be tough to find in the PNW. You should have access to plenty of it in the Scottsdale area.

I haven't tried orange wood, usually use apple or cherry wood. I may have to look for it.
quote:
Originally posted by Lakersguy:
Prime Rib with Pecan wood!


I did a 16 lb. whole bone in standing rib roast over pecan myself for Christmas. I felt like I was in the Flintstones. Big Grin It was some tough sledding near the end as it was only -2 outside. There were no leftovers, so I guess the crowd approved.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by Lakersguy:
Prime Rib with Pecan wood!


I did a 16 lb. whole bone in standing rib roast over pecan myself for Christmas. I felt like I was in the Flintstones. Big Grin It was some tough sledding near the end as it was only -2 outside. There were no leftovers, so I guess the crowd approved.

I was joking with D that I wouldn’t be surprised if you were tending to meat and fire outside. Smile
Shorts and Jimmy Buffet shirt?
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
I was joking with D that I wouldn’t be surprised if you were tending to meat and fire outside. Smile
Shorts and Jimmy Buffet shirt?


You know me well Bill. Indeed it was shorts and a Hawaiian shirt. I did comment that it was one of the colder cooks that I can remember.
Last couple weeks:
Bone in prime rib (salt/pepper)
Pork shoulder (cider based brine then a brown sugar based rub)
Turkey breasts (2 day brine, then a rub)

Prime rib and turkey breasts were outstanding. I have yet to conquer the large pork cuts (I've had great success with brisket which I feel is more challenging).

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!

sarbuze, have you tried the trick of rubbing, then placing it in a plastic bag with a couple cups of apple cider vinegar overnight? Rub again the next morning and smoke. Tenderizes and gives it a bit more acidity.
Alternately, you can add a vinegar-based finishing sauce after pulling. I do this all the time now.
1 c. good apple cider vinegar
2 T. brown sugar
1 t. bbq seasoning or whatever rub you use
1 t. coarse ground black pepper
1 t. red pepper flakes
Warm enough to dissolve the sugar and then apply liberally to the meat; it will soak right in. Strangely, the vinegar will seem hardly present at all, but it gives the pork yet another layer of flavor.
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.

Here's my go-to recipe. This stuff gets devoured at my house:

- Get the smoker up to temp (225 - 275ish...doesn't really matter for pork). Apple or Cherry wood. Use more than you normally would.

- Prep the pork right before it goes on the smoker. Cold meat seems to yield a better smoke ring/ profile.

- Yellow mustard binder, with "Bad Byron's Butt Rub" is all I use. No injection, no brine, no AP. Keep it simple: Mustard & rub.

- Minimal trimming. I'm mainly looking for glands, veins, big fat deposits. Basically, stuff I don't want to eat.

- Set it & forget it on the smoker. I'll spritz with Apple Juice or beer every 4 hours or so, but that's it.

- DO NOT WRAP! It destroys the bark. Ride the stall (usually at 160F - 170F).

- Pull at 190F - 195F. Cover with foil & rest it in a cooler for an hour or two.

My Favorite Sauce:

This is an Eastern NC vinegar sauce. I'm pretty sure this stuff is a Schedule 1 addictive narcotic in 47 states - It's that good.

- 2 cups White Vinegar

- 2 cups Cider Vinegar

- A bunch of red pepper flakes

- A bunch of cayenne pepper (just eyeball it)

- 1/2 cup brown sugar

- Hot sauce (to taste, but a few drops of Dave's Insanity is great here)


- Bring to a slow boil, stir occasionally, then turn off the heat & cover. This stuff will keep in the fridge for a few months, and tastes better after a week or so.
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.



ha look at all the steps.

No need to over-complicate is:

I threw my pork shoulder in my slow cooker for 4 hours with some sugar/salt/spices and mixed in some liquid smoke at the end.

i dont have to even touch it and everyone loves it ;-)
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.



ha look at all the steps.

No need to over-complicate is:

I threw my pork shoulder in my slow cooker for 4 hours with some sugar/salt/spices and mixed in some liquid smoke at the end.

i dont have to even touch it and everyone loves it ;-)


G-man to the Pit of Misery. Dilly Dilly!
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:

Would LOVE to get a good pork butt/shoulder recipe from someone and actually follow it, which I never do!


No need to over-complicate with this brining bullshit. Save that for birds.

I smoke 1-2 butts/ shoulders a month, and it's got to be the most forgiving meat out there. The key is to leave it the hell alone, don't wrap, and get that sucker to at least 190F - 195F.



ha look at all the steps.

No need to over-complicate is:

I threw my pork shoulder in my slow cooker for 4 hours with some sugar/salt/spices and mixed in some liquid smoke at the end.

i dont have to even touch it and everyone loves it ;-)


G-man to the Pit of Misery. Dilly Dilly!

Have to agree with Shane. Bad form.
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
Anybody ordered from Snake River Farms, Lobel's, etc? If so, what's your experience?

I just ordered a 14lb Kurabota shoulder from SRF. We'll see if it beats Costco...


i've walked into lobel's and picked up some steaks.

they were good but i honestly wouldnt pay up ever again
quote:
Originally posted by Shane T.:
Anybody ordered from Snake River Farms, Lobel's, etc? If so, what's your experience?

I just ordered a 14lb Kurabota shoulder from SRF. We'll see if it beats Costco...

I have purchased a few things from SRF over the past couple years. The regular beef rib roasts were good, but not outstanding. Not worth the extra $ imo. Have not tried their Wagyu.
However, the Kurabota ham that I tried was probably the best ham I've ever had. So I would treat that shoulder with special care.
acutlaly if you guys have some local coop farms, i'd highly recommend seeing if you guys can share some cuts of meats with the locals.

some local heritage pork farms by me do some kunekune pigs and the meat is fantastic.

excellent breed for charcuterie.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
acutlaly if you guys have some local coop farms, i'd highly recommend seeing if you guys can share some cuts of meats with the locals.

some local heritage pork farms by me do some kunekune pigs and the meat is fantastic.

excellent breed for charcuterie.


Great idea, G-man. It looks like there's a farm near me that raises "Mangalitsa" pigs. Definitely giving them a call.
I have 3 types of bacon experiments in the smoker right now.

1. Maple--where I've used both maple sugar in the cure, and coated with maple syrup. Getting significant real maple flavor into bacon is harder than you might think. Commercial maple bacon is done thru injecting extracts and chemicals.
2. Black Forest--special set of spices used in the cure and coated before smoking.
3. Savory--lessened the sugar in the cure, and added more savory flavors like garlic, onion, black pepper, and thyme.
Using my usual combination of corn cob and cherry for smoke. We'll see how they come out. Razz
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I have 3 types of bacon experiments in the smoker right now.

1. Maple--where I've used both maple sugar in the cure, and coated with maple syrup. Getting significant real maple flavor into bacon is harder than you might think. Commercial maple bacon is done thru injecting extracts and chemicals.


maple is like bbq sauce in my opinion.

so i do is that I'll cure with maple sugar, but come smoking time, I'll smoke as low as the WSM will go. the bacon without a maple syrup coat as it makes it way too black and the bacon doesnt take the smoke. This is just for the smoke to take + the cure. Take it out after (2? hours, i can't recall exactly), lightly fork poke it through out and then cover it in warm maple syrup and seal it up in either foil or a container. if you let it rest like that, the bacon will really take the maple syrup flavor.
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
chicken wings.


Have you done this before? How long do you smoke them?


It's a regular thing at my place. 275 for 90 minutes. I like a crispy skin so I finish them for 2-3 minutes under the broiler. Perfect every time.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
bah i typed cold smoking and bacon now all the websites i'm visiting have ads related to cold smoking and bacon.

bloody heck.

I'm going to add "escorts" and "guns" just for because.


Try hookers and blow and let me know how it works out.

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×