I'm going to do a full brisket next time, but I haven't been able to find one small enough. The market had 14-16 lb packers. Something just under 10 lbs would probably fit well on that size BGE. Or I could trim off some of the flat until it fits on the grates.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
I'm going to do a full brisket next time, but I haven't been able to find one small enough. The market had 14-16 lb packers. Something just under 10 lbs would probably fit well on that size BGE. Or I could trim off some of the flat until it fits on the grates.


It's going to be difficult to find a full brisket under 10 lbs. You'd probably be better off getting a full packer and separating the point from the flat yourself. Sometimes I have seen a flat with some of the point still attached, but not very often.
Yestday:

my best brisket yet, around 7 lbs, great smoke ring and just dripping with juice when i sliced it (rested it around 40 mins)

pork shoulder: only had a small taste, it took 3 hours longer than planned and it was getting late (11 PM). the skin was great, will have more in a couple days when I get back from a quick work trip but my wife/daughter will enjoy and report back tonight Smile
The picture you showed us was Texas BBQ worthy.

quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
Yestday:

my best brisket yet, around 7 lbs, great smoke ring and just dripping with juice when i sliced it (rested it around 40 mins)

pork shoulder: only had a small taste, it took 3 hours longer than planned and it was getting late (11 PM). the skin was great, will have more in a couple days when I get back from a quick work trip but my wife/daughter will enjoy and report back tonight Smile
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Added a new smoker/grill to my collection. Green Mountain Grills--Daniel Boone model pellet grill. First time with a pellet pooper. Now I get to start that learning curve all over again. Big Grin

It finally quit e'ffing raining around here so I can get some serious bbq going.
Christened the GMG with some chicken wings and bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin a few days ago. Both came out great!
So now for an over-nighter. I just put an 11 lb. brisket packer on at 9pm, at 230°. We'll see how long it takes. I have it hooked up to a temp probe with an alarm. Hopefully, it'll go at least 12 hours, and I will be able to sleep in a little bit tomorrow.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Added a new smoker/grill to my collection. Green Mountain Grills--Daniel Boone model pellet grill. First time with a pellet pooper. Now I get to start that learning curve all over again. Big Grin


GMG is very easy to use. Just like an oven. Set the temp and come back to check meat temps.
I brine 2 chickens in salt and lemons/limes for 24 hours. Grill set at 340. Flip it in an hour and take it off about 30 minutes later. Easy to get consistent results.
quote:
Originally posted by ADC:

GMG is very easy to use. Just like an oven. Set the temp and come back to check meat temps.
I brine 2 chickens in salt and lemons/limes for 24 hours. Grill set at 340. Flip it in an hour and take it off about 30 minutes later. Easy to get consistent results.

Just finishing up now. Should be done by 11:30am PDT. I was a little surprised that I had to refill the hopper twice. Once at 4 am and again at 7:30 am. It probably got down to 50° or below last night, and there's always some wind, so I figure that must have had something to do with it.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
Do those pellets inhibit the creation of the smoke ring? Or do you add actual wood chips like apple, hickory, etc.?

Not sure I understand the question. The pellets are wood. Smoke rings are created by the meat absorbing the nitrogen dioxide produced from burning wood or charcoal. Here is a good little article on it.
At higher temperatures, there won't be as noticeable a ring, as the higher heat tends to consume more of the smoke. They make products to create more smoke in the chamber with other pellets, so you can get more of the specific flavor profile you're looking for. I have one of the tube smokers, but haven't tried it out yet. I'm still experimenting on this new grill.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Not sure I understand the question. The pellets are wood. Smoke rings are created by the meat absorbing the nitrogen dioxide produced from burning wood or charcoal.

I understand the pellets are wood. But, isn't it compressed wood? If so, what is the binding agent? And do you think that material inhibits the smoke ring. My understanding is that if you are BBQing, you want the lower temperatures anyway.
you could cheat and rub curing salt #1 around the outside as you're cooking hehe

i'm starting to be of the mind that the smoke ring is just looks appeal.

and you could technically brine the meat with curing salt before hand to get the same texture as a very very long smoke.
My wife brought home a pork butt over the holiday weekend. Timing was tricky as we had golf games planned four days in a row. I decided to do a night cook on Monday night. Fired up the smoker and had the butt on by 8:30 PM. I had planned to go with the smoker throughout the cook, but by 1:30 AM I changed course and put the butt into the oven inside set at 225 degrees to get a good night sleep. Woke up early yesterday and cranked the heat to 275 to finish. Foiled through the stall and had the butt out of the oven and in the cambro by 10 AM. Spent most of the rest of the day at the club and pulled the pork at about 6 PM. Delicious.

I usually enjoy sitting on the deck throughout a smoke, but the timing on this one just didn't work out. The house smelled glorious in the morning though.

For an upcoming smoke, I'm going to do some pork belly burnt ends this weekend.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
i'm starting to be of the mind that the smoke ring is just looks appeal.



A smoke ring is nice optics, but ultimately means nothing to the taste of the food.


The ring itsef is just nice optics, but the nitrates definitely do change the texture of the meat.

the nitrates binds the meat molecules and changes it to gives meat that firmer not as gritty "ham" texture.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I understand the pellets are wood. But, isn't it compressed wood? If so, what is the binding agent? And do you think that material inhibits the smoke ring. My understanding is that if you are BBQing, you want the lower temperatures anyway.

On the better quality pellets, there is no binder other than steam. Heat from the process releases lignins in the wood which act as a natural binder, holding the pellet together as it is compressed. Some lesser manufacturers will add a food-grade oil or wax as a binder or flavoring agent. I never buy those. In fact, if you want true flavor wood pellets, you need to read how they're made. Most start with oak or alder as a neutral base, then add a percentage of apple or cherry or whatever, and call it good.
And yes, true bbq is low and slow. But this particular new grill can also go up to 500° to cook steaks or burgers using pellets.
quote:
Originally posted by WinoCA:
Are there any anti-pellet purists in the house? I have some friends who wouldn't be caught dead with pellets. I'd like to think I could tell the difference but I can't.

I've been doing this for long enough, that I can tell you what kind of wood you're using, based on the smell of the smoke alone. If you're talking about the difference between pellets and charcoal, sure, there is a difference in taste, with pellets giving a more "woodsy" flavor, even when I add wood chunks to the charcoal. Each method has its pros and cons, and flavor can be subjective. For instance, I'm making teriyaki chicken tonight, and I much prefer the char flavor that I get from charcoal on that.

I have grills and smokers that are charcoal, electric, and now pellet. (I've dumped the propane one, as no longer necessary. Its only pro was convenience, a quick heating time.) I've even built a temporary pit from cinder blocks and expanded steel to cook a whole pig. The only thing I don't have is a big, steel, stick burner. Not that I don't like the flavor they produce; there is a great bbq stand near me that makes some really good 'Que on theirs, but it looks like a civil war, iron-clad battleship. Even the smaller ones that look like mini attack submarines aren't really built for the average weekend hobbyist. They take a long time to build up heat, and need a large, steady supply of wood. Most people don't have the time for that kind of commitment.
So I fired up the smoker today and have a slab of baby backs on, and the butcher talked me into a slab of boneless ribs...I don't have high hopes, but figured I'd give them a try.

My question though has to do with smoked sausage. I just got back from a week in Dallas, TX and that sausage thing they do there is a delicious and different animal from what we do here. I'm at a loss though on where to start. What I had (twice) was a spicy red colored semi dense sausage served in slices. It's not a brat or italian sausage. My butcher's grinder was down or he said he'd make me some, but what the heck should I be looking for to try and replicate it?
I left with a stick of anduille and some keilbasa as well.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
So I fired up the smoker today and have a slab of baby backs on, and the butcher talked me into a slab of boneless ribs...I don't have high hopes, but figured I'd give them a try.

My question though has to do with smoked sausage. I just got back from a week in Dallas, TX and that sausage thing they do there is a delicious and different animal from what we do here. I'm at a loss though on where to start. What I had (twice) was a spicy red colored semi dense sausage served in slices. It's not a brat or italian sausage. My butcher's grinder was down or he said he'd make me some, but what the heck should I be looking for to try and replicate it?
I left with a stick of anduille and some keilbasa as well.


What you want to re-create is the jalepeno sausage from the Hard Eight...so good...
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Not sure I understand the question. The pellets are wood. Smoke rings are created by the meat absorbing the nitrogen dioxide produced from burning wood or charcoal.

I understand the pellets are wood. But, isn't it compressed wood? If so, what is the binding agent? And do you think that material inhibits the smoke ring. My understanding is that if you are BBQing, you want the lower temperatures anyway.


DD -- reading backwards here so someone may have already answered this

You get every bit of smoke-ring with pellets as with hard wood briquettes and wood chunks. I've done side by side comparisons of the BGE and my pellet grill multiple times (once with Snipes present). And, despite nay-sayers, I have found that the pellet grills best the BGE and other smokers in the following ways:
1) Brainlessly easy to use (that said, you do lose the "craft" and hands on nature of smoking if you have the time and interest to do that)
2) Amazingly consistent, set and forget results
3) Amazingly similar end-result to a more traditional smoker. The one thing my wife has noticed is that the pellet-smoked meats don't seem to taste as smokey as their BGE counter-parts and she likes this quality of the pellet grills. Of course, level of smoke on a BGE is 100% depending on the type of charcoal and wood chunks you use so it's hard to say any more about that

Now, just waiting for Shane to chime in and tell me he will smack down both my pellet smoker AND BGE with a Weber Smokey Mountain!
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:

Now, just waiting for Shane to chime in and tell me he will smack down both my pellet smoker AND BGE with a Weber Smokey Mountain!


WSM user here. I'm about to add a Weber Summit Charcoal grill as well. I won't bad mouth pellet smokers or BGE as I've never used one. I'm a Weber guy to the core.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:

Now, just waiting for Shane to chime in and tell me he will smack down both my pellet smoker AND BGE with a Weber Smokey Mountain!


WSM user here. I'm about to add a Weber Summit Charcoal grill as well. I won't bad mouth pellet smokers or BGE as I've never used one. I'm a Weber guy to the core.

I have both a Weber Performer and a Weber One-Touch Gold. As much as I like my other toys, these are still the most versatile grillers/smokers in my lineup. Can't beat a steak grilled over charcoal, imo. They just take more time and tending, which is fine if I have the time.
quote:
Can't beat a steak grilled over charcoal, imo. They just take more time and tending, which is fine if I have the time.


Agree with steak over charcoal. And, for the price it's pretty darned hard to beat a Weber

I enjoyed working with the BGE for several years. But, with two young kids at home I found I just did not have the time I wanted to play with this grill.

For now, the plug and play convenience of the pellet grill provides much needed convenience!
Found a 4.75 lb. frozen Butterball turkey breast roast at Costco the other day for about $13. It's in the smoker now at 275°, with some rub and injected with garlic butter. Using orange wood for smoke; I really like orange with poultry. If it turns out well, I will probably go back and get a couple more for Thanksgiving. So much easier than messing with a whole turkey.
My oldest son passed his test today to become a black belt in Tae Kwon Do. Been smoking a 19 lb packer brisket since midnight on our Traeger pellet smoker. Heading home soon to confirm internal temp and crank up as necessary, then will wrap and stash in a cooler for a couple hours. Good amount of family and friends will be here in a few hours to celebrate. Smile
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........

Fusion, usually after brining, you want to cut off a small test piece and fry it to test the salt level. If it's too much, you can reduce some of the salt by submersing in cold water for a few hours, changing out the water once or twice. Then dry and smoke.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........

Fusion, usually after brining, you want to cut off a small test piece and fry it to test the salt level. If it's too much, you can reduce some of the salt by submersing in cold water for a few hours, changing out the water once or twice. Then dry and smoke.

Thanks for the pointer! After wrapping and chilling overnight, the saltiness seemed to have tamped down a couple of notches. Still a little too salty for my liking, but more than fine as long as consumed with other, less salty foods.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by fusionstorm:
Just made my first ever batch of homemade bacon. Unfortunately the recipe I used had too much salt in the ratio. Still tasty, but not ideal for just munching on slices by themselves.

Next time, I'll decrease the salt by at least 1/3, and add a bit more sugar and more pepper to the dry brine........

Fusion, usually after brining, you want to cut off a small test piece and fry it to test the salt level. If it's too much, you can reduce some of the salt by submersing in cold water for a few hours, changing out the water once or twice. Then dry and smoke.


Yes definitely your methods is correct to adjust the salt level..

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