quote:
Did a high heat brisket over oak on Memorial Day. Ran the smoker at about 360-375 rather than traditional 225-275. Delicious with some grilled bread, grilled corn and a watermelon and mint salad. First time I've done a high heat brisky, and I'm not sure if I'm sold on the method.


Very interesting. Never heard of this before. Any details you can provide or a link to a recipe? I had someone recently giving me a ton of shit about running at 250 for a brisket...i've found that to be my sweet spot.
quote:
Originally posted by slipstitchpass:
quote:
Did a high heat brisket over oak on Memorial Day. Ran the smoker at about 360-375 rather than traditional 225-275. Delicious with some grilled bread, grilled corn and a watermelon and mint salad. First time I've done a high heat brisky, and I'm not sure if I'm sold on the method.


Very interesting. Never heard of this before. Any details you can provide or a link to a recipe? I had someone recently giving me a ton of shit about running at 250 for a brisket...i've found that to be my sweet spot.


Slip, if you want to run at 250 and that works for you, do it. I don't believe there is a single right (or wrong) way to smoke BBQ.

There is a whole segment of the BBQ world that does high heat brisket. Also, search the forums at VWB for numerous threads of people doing high heat.

I've done a lot of different high heat proteins, but there is just something I really enjoy about low and slow and dialing in the smoker where I want it to be.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by slipstitchpass:
quote:
Did a high heat brisket over oak on Memorial Day. Ran the smoker at about 360-375 rather than traditional 225-275. Delicious with some grilled bread, grilled corn and a watermelon and mint salad. First time I've done a high heat brisky, and I'm not sure if I'm sold on the method.


Very interesting. Never heard of this before. Any details you can provide or a link to a recipe? I had someone recently giving me a ton of shit about running at 250 for a brisket...i've found that to be my sweet spot.


Slip, if you want to run at 250 and that works for you, do it. I don't believe there is a single right (or wrong) way to smoke BBQ.

There is a whole segment of the BBQ world that does high heat brisket. Also, search the forums at VWB for numerous threads of people doing high heat.

I've done a lot of different high heat proteins, but there is just something I really enjoy about low and slow and dialing in the smoker where I want it to be.


TLV . . . agree there is no one right way. Did a 10-ish pound pastrami-d brisket a few weeks ago at 210 for about 16 hours.

One take on that temperature: why the heck do you want it to take so long for your meat to get done? My answer - don't know; just playing around with temps.

Actually have never tried the high temp before but going to check out the thread you posted. It seems a little counter-intuitive to do such a fatty piece of meat at such a high temp but interested in checking the comments out
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
It's certainly up to you what you put in it, but imo, the maltose is one of the principle ingredients in the dish. It is much, much thicker than honey, corn syrup, or molasses. It has the look and consistency of fiberglass resin; hard to believe it is edible at all, but I have had the best results using it.


Cost of entry was pretty easy (~$6) so going to be making this on Friday using your recipe. Will give an update over the weekend


Mneeley . . . made your char siu recipe for dinner last night. The pork loin had only been marinating for 10 hours so last night was a test run. Very good on this first pass.

Cooking up the remainder for dinner tomorrow night and going to reduce the sauce a little to serve on top of the pork and rice

And you were absolutely right. . . that maltose syrup is like soft melted plastic
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Mneeley . . . made your char siu recipe for dinner last night. The pork loin had only been marinating for 10 hours so last night was a test run. Very good on this first pass.

Cooking up the remainder for dinner tomorrow night and going to reduce the sauce a little to serve on top of the pork and rice

And you were absolutely right. . . that maltose syrup is like soft melted plastic

Glad you liked it. I like to let it marinate for about 2-3 days.
I smoked baby backs today. I'd like to make a couple of shout outs.

I bought this book Low and Slow when I got my smoker and went through it. The rub recipes he gives are really excellent. Today we used the "rudimentary rub" which was paprika, salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, and cayenne, and it made an awesome bark on our ribs.

We buy BBQ sauce from Head Country Head Country in Oklahoma. I grew up in Oklahoma, but only discovered this long after I had moved away thanks to a recommendation from my mom. We've been ordering it by the case ever since. I like the spicy and the mild, but my wife thinks the spicy is too spicy. Good stuff.

The ribs today were fine with and without the sauce.
Have always used a weber grill for smoking (indirect method) but finally broke down and bought the Weber Rocky Mountain smoker (gman's advice).

First time using it this past weekend:

- pork ribs (5 racks, dry rubbed w/ my own bbq rub)
- whole chickens (dry rubbed, herbs)
- 2.5 lb salmon fillet (lemon, tarragon, salt, pepper)

The ribs were good. Overdone a bit (which Gman was kind enough to message me about after seeing my facebook post) but the group loved them. The flavor was good, homemade bbq sauce was a hit and my family wants me to start jarring it for them (have made it this way for years). Just need to work on timing, the pork spent too much time in the smoker.

Chickens were incredibly moist. Served with olive oil and lemons, huge hit.

Salmon was good, pulled it off a bit medium rare and it went over well with the group.

Very excited to get this thing going again in the near future, next up will be a whole turkey and a duck.

Smile
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
Have always used a weber grill for smoking (indirect method) but finally broke down and bought the Weber Rocky Mountain smoker (gman's advice).

First time using it this past weekend:

- pork ribs (5 racks, dry rubbed w/ my own bbq rub)
- whole chickens (dry rubbed, herbs)
- 2.5 lb salmon fillet (lemon, tarragon, salt, pepper)

The ribs were good. Overdone a bit (which Gman was kind enough to message me about after seeing my facebook post) but the group loved them. The flavor was good, homemade bbq sauce was a hit and my family wants me to start jarring it for them (have made it this way for years). Just need to work on timing, the pork spent too much time in the smoker.

Chickens were incredibly moist. Served with olive oil and lemons, huge hit.

Salmon was good, pulled it off a bit medium rare and it went over well with the group.

Very excited to get this thing going again in the near future, next up will be a whole turkey and a duck.

Smile


I found out your mistake.

it's the weber smokey mountain you were suppose to buy, not the weber rocky mountain.

no wonder your stuff wasnt as good as it was suppose to be!
Smoked a whole chicken using apple wood. Brined it over night. Stuffed with apple, lemon, onion and garlic. Coated the outside with olive oil and rubbed with kosher salt, pepper and paprika. Smoked at 250 for about 6 hours to 170 degrees internal. Sit for 20 minutes and then pulled it to serve.

VM
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Me:
Smoked a whole chicken using apple wood. Brined it over night. Stuffed with apple, lemon, onion and garlic. Coated the outside with olive oil and rubbed with kosher salt, pepper and paprika. Smoked at 250 for about 6 hours to 170 degrees internal. Sit for 20 minutes and then pulled it to serve.

VM


Sounds delicious.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Got up at 3am to throw a couple 9+ lb. pork butts into the smoker. Hopefully will be done by dinner time, but you never know for sure. Using a combination of woods; hickory, maple, and cherry.


Those are some big butts. Smoking a 5.5 lb butt
quote:
Originally posted by ThistlinTom:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
Got up at 3am to throw a couple 9+ lb. pork butts into the smoker. Hopefully will be done by dinner time, but you never know for sure. Using a combination of woods; hickory, maple, and cherry.


Those are some big butts. Smoking a 5.5 lb butt

I get mine at a wholesaler. Go big, or go home, I say. Wink
Unfortunately, (probably due to the size) they took quite a while to hit 205° internal, so I was pulling about 9pm last night. Oh well, it tasted great tonight!

I like to go traditional with pulled pork sandwhiches. Cheap hamburger buns, pork, cole slaw, and my award winning bbq sauce.
I say, "award winning" in that I entered it a couple years ago in the state fair, and it won 2nd place...for canning technique. Turns out, they don't even taste the entries, fearing botulism. When told that afterward, my autistic son pipes up, "MY DAD DOES NOT PUT BOTULISM IN HIS BARBECUE SAUCE!"
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
What wireless thermometer is everyone using/recommending?

That's on my list to buy this week.

Thanks


I've been using an Oregon Scientific for what feels like a decade, but she's starting to show her age, but did log a solid 16 hours this past weekend so the old girl isn't giving it up just yet.

Anyway I started my search again recently so this is a bit top of mind for me.

Most of the new contenders offer integration with your mobile device via bluetooth or wifi rather than a dedicated remote.

iGrill is a popular one, but what I'm leaning towards at the moment is a product called Tappecue. Pricy, but I like the option of wifi enabled and remote visibility for those long smokes.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I ran into a similar issue this past weekend mneeley. I put a almost 7 lb on my new smoker and we were eating it at 10:30 that night.

Starting at midnight this weekend.


for a pork butt?

what time did you start?
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I ran into a similar issue this past weekend mneeley. I put a almost 7 lb on my new smoker and we were eating it at 10:30 that night.

Starting at midnight this weekend.


for a pork butt?

what time did you start?


I put it on at 6 a.m., pulled from fridge and started smoker about 45 min earlier. @225
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
I ran into a similar issue this past weekend mneeley. I put a almost 7 lb on my new smoker and we were eating it at 10:30 that night.

Starting at midnight this weekend.


for a pork butt?

what time did you start?


I put it on at 6 a.m., pulled from fridge and started smoker about 45 min earlier. @225


dannng and it was completed 16 hours later?!?!
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.


I usually go four hours and then foil. I really like to use the jus after I put it through a fat separator as a sauce. I've also used on later butts if I'm injecting.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.


I usually go four hours and then foil. I really like to use the jus after I put it through a fat separator as a sauce. I've also used on later butts if I'm injecting.


oh you put a drip pan under the meat as you're smoking?

wsm it just goes straight into the water bowl, i'd be scared to pull anything outta that water since i only rinse off the bowl as oppose to actually cleaning it thoroughly

i do use the juice that drips out from the foil though. good stuff right there!
quote:
Originally posted by sarbuze:
What wireless thermometer is everyone using/recommending?

That's on my list to buy this week.

Thanks


I've been using the Maverick ET-733 for the last few years and am very happy with it. I actually have two in case I'm smoking several proteins at once. It is dual probe, but I like to use one probe for the temp at the cooking grate.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


yea that's what i was thinking

I foil because of that after the 3 hour mark.


I usually go four hours and then foil. I really like to use the jus after I put it through a fat separator as a sauce. I've also used on later butts if I'm injecting.


oh you put a drip pan under the meat as you're smoking?

wsm it just goes straight into the water bowl, i'd be scared to pull anything outta that water since i only rinse off the bowl as oppose to actually cleaning it thoroughly

i do use the juice that drips out from the foil though. good stuff right there!


No, I'm talking about the juice that is retained in the foil. As for the water pan, I don't typically use water as I don't find it necessary. Instead, I normally foil the water pan so that I don't need to clean it after a cook.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


I foiled it this time, but a bit different than the norm. I left it on until it passed the stall ~170 and then put the butt in a cheap aluminum throw away pan, added some liquid (dr. pepper) and foiled over the top. -Tried a new technique...meh.

I don't typically foil any of my bbq, but may have to rethink that if I start doing more butts again. I did it on my original charcoal smoker years ago, but at the time didn't quite grasp the nuances on why I was doing it and the juices were a PIA along with losing some of the crust.

Just threw a TBone on it, well heating it up now. First time. I'm going to finish on a cast iron skillet for sear.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Yup. Now it's a brand new smoker so I'll allow that I haven't validated the internal temp to what the meter says, but my old one was the same way. I never got 2 hrs. per pound at 225. But DAMN was it good.


It's done when it's done. Although, that had to be a pretty serious stall. Did you foil?


I foiled it this time, but a bit different than the norm. I left it on until it passed the stall ~170 and then put the butt in a cheap aluminum throw away pan, added some liquid (dr. pepper) and foiled over the top. -Tried a new technique...meh.

I don't typically foil any of my bbq, but may have to rethink that if I start doing more butts again. I did it on my original charcoal smoker years ago, but at the time didn't quite grasp the nuances on why I was doing it and the juices were a PIA along with losing some of the crust.


i believe teh science behind it is that once you open it up from the foil, you once again will immediately go back into a stall and basically waste 2-3 hours until you get back over that hump again.
A few things:
I use a Maverick ET-732 remote thermometer, around $60; a slightly older model than the 733. It still works like a champ and I highly recommend it for overnight cooks. You can monitor meat temp and smoker temp from the comfort of your warm bed, instead of babysitting the smoker all night.

Cooking time is only an estimate. Every piece of meat is different, and cooks differently. I've had an 8 lb. pork butt take only 6 hours, and I've had one go 16, with identical smoking techniques. The ones I did Sunday never did an actual stall, but moved steadily but slowly upward. Even so, I still foiled at 165° IT, and I also save the juices to pour back onto the meat after pulling. The gravy separator is a must, as about 1/3 of it is fat. Then comes a vinegar-based finishing sauce for an extra layer of flavor.

The water bowl serves 2 purposes. It keeps the smoker environment moist on long smokes for lean cuts of meat like brisket (not necessary for fatty things like pork butt), and it acts as a heat sink to help regulate and steady the temp inside the smoker. When smoking something that doesn't need extra moisture, I fill mine with playground sand and foil the top. That way I still get the benefit of the heat sink feature.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
A few things:
I use a Maverick ET-732 remote thermometer, around $60; a slightly older model than the 733. It still works like a champ and I highly recommend it for overnight cooks. You can monitor meat temp and smoker temp from the comfort of your warm bed, instead of babysitting the smoker all night.

Cooking time is only an estimate. Every piece of meat is different, and cooks differently. I've had an 8 lb. pork butt take only 6 hours, and I've had one go 16, with identical smoking techniques. The ones I did Sunday never did an actual stall, but moved steadily but slowly upward. Even so, I still foiled at 165° IT, and I also save the juices to pour back onto the meat after pulling. The gravy separator is a must, as about 1/3 of it is fat. Then comes a vinegar-based finishing sauce for an extra layer of flavor.

The water bowl serves 2 purposes. It keeps the smoker environment moist on long smokes for lean cuts of meat like brisket (not necessary for fatty things like pork butt), and it acts as a heat sink to help regulate and steady the temp inside the smoker. When smoking something that doesn't need extra moisture, I fill mine with playground sand and foil the top. That way I still get the benefit of the heat sink feature.


Mneeley . . . would you ever consider a smoking tutorial for forumites? I don't come to Seattle often for work, but reading through many of your posts it strikes me that I and many of us could really benefit from your smoking skills and suggestions.

I feel like I have developed some pretty solid skills over the years, but when I read your posts I am reminded of how junior-league I am !!

-this is a totally serious question btw

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