I used a brown gravy that I added a little hoisin sauce to for a little oriental kick. The last time I made it, I also topped the rice with some leftover pulled pork that I smoked the week before.

I served it to LostVerse, Allred and our wives and didn't hear any complaints.

VM
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Me:
I used a brown gravy that I added a little hoisin sauce to for a little oriental kick. The last time I made it, I also topped the rice with some leftover pulled pork that I smoked the week before.

I served it to LostVerse, Allred and our wives and didn't hear any complaints.

VM


No complaints here at all - it was delicious.
Skin on the belly or off?

quote:
Originally posted by Vino Me:
Smoked Pork Belly
I incorporated a smoked pork belly into a version of a Loco Moco breakfast that I made. Loco Moco is a Hawaiian breakfast dish which normally includes brown gravy over rice, fried spam, a couple fried eggs on top and garnished with chopped green onions. I used the pork belly instead of the spam.

Brine your slab of pork belly over night. You can use either apple juice or water with the kosher salt. Smoke the pork belly using fruit wood at 225 degrees until the internal temp is about 160. Should take 4-5 hours. Baste the belly with bbq sauce during the 2nd half of the smoking process. I then let the belly cool down and placed it in the fridge overnight to use the next morning. I cut the pork belly into half inch thick strip and fried them in a pan to get the outside nice and crisp before plating them with the Loco Moco.

VM
quote:
Originally posted by GalvezGuy:
Skin on the belly or off?

quote:
Originally posted by Vino Me:
Smoked Pork Belly
I incorporated a smoked pork belly into a version of a Loco Moco breakfast that I made. Loco Moco is a Hawaiian breakfast dish which normally includes brown gravy over rice, fried spam, a couple fried eggs on top and garnished with chopped green onions. I used the pork belly instead of the spam.

Brine your slab of pork belly over night. You can use either apple juice or water with the kosher salt. Smoke the pork belly using fruit wood at 225 degrees until the internal temp is about 160. Should take 4-5 hours. Baste the belly with bbq sauce during the 2nd half of the smoking process. I then let the belly cool down and placed it in the fridge overnight to use the next morning. I cut the pork belly into half inch thick strip and fried them in a pan to get the outside nice and crisp before plating them with the Loco Moco.

VM


i skin it personally

the skin gets kinda tough when smoked
Baby back ribs last night. Great set of ribs with about an inch and a half of meat above the bone. Hot smoked for 5 hours at 225 using peach chips. The peach smoke with pork is even better than my former favorite apple. One of my best efforts, first time with ribs in the new setup.
after enjoying smoking on the Big Green Egg for many many years, but finding less and less time to do it, I caved and bought a pellet smoker . . .

Yes, you no longer get the satisfaction of building, tending to, and maintenance your own fire, but you can smoke spur of the moment, leave and go to the gym 5 minutes after you press the start button and set the temp, go work out, work for a few hours, and come home to delicious smoked meat.

Anyway, I digress . . .in the past two days:
-smoked chicken wings with apple wood pellets (then tossed in a hot cast iron pan with a habanero-mango bbq sauce)
-Baby back ribs (ala TDUB recipe) last night smoked with pecan wood pellets. Served with a few different bbq sauces on the side.

Still have my Big Green Egg and look forward to using it when I have the time. But, with the pellet grill, I have a feeling that smoking will become a much more regular occurrence around here
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
after enjoying smoking on the Big Green Egg for many many years, but finding less and less time to do it, I caved and bought a pellet smoker . . .

Yes, you no longer get the satisfaction of building, tending to, and maintenance your own fire, but you can smoke spur of the moment, leave and go to the gym 5 minutes after you press the start button and set the temp, go work out, work for a few hours, and come home to delicious smoked meat.

Anyway, I digress . . .in the past two days:
-smoked chicken wings with apple wood pellets (then tossed in a hot cast iron pan with a habanero-mango bbq sauce)
-Baby back ribs (ala TDUB recipe) last night smoked with pecan wood pellets. Served with a few different bbq sauces on the side.

Still have my Big Green Egg and look forward to using it when I have the time. But, with the pellet grill, I have a feeling that smoking will become a much more regular occurrence around here


but how else can you get a bunch of guys sitting around a big charcoal fire drinking first growths??
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
after enjoying smoking on the Big Green Egg for many many years, but finding less and less time to do it, I caved and bought a pellet smoker . . .

Yes, you no longer get the satisfaction of building, tending to, and maintenance your own fire, but you can smoke spur of the moment, leave and go to the gym 5 minutes after you press the start button and set the temp, go work out, work for a few hours, and come home to delicious smoked meat.

Anyway, I digress . . .in the past two days:
-smoked chicken wings with apple wood pellets (then tossed in a hot cast iron pan with a habanero-mango bbq sauce)
-Baby back ribs (ala TDUB recipe) last night smoked with pecan wood pellets. Served with a few different bbq sauces on the side.

Still have my Big Green Egg and look forward to using it when I have the time. But, with the pellet grill, I have a feeling that smoking will become a much more regular occurrence around here


but how else can you get a bunch of guys sitting around a big charcoal fire drinking first growths??
'

Just more drinking time while we all sit around and say things like "is that thing still working" . . . response will be "yup" and then you take another sip!
Cured pork loin going in the smoker tomorrow morning. Will smoke with maple chips at 225 until it reaches 160. Thinking of adding a glaze of maple syrup and dark brown sugar near the end of cooking. After it is removed and cools down half will be sliced into chops and the other half thin cut for back bacon.

Update, turned out pretty well. The sweetness of the glaze was very nice against the smoky salty meat. Will be a little better with some time to integrate more of the sweetness.
Two different smokes today.

Started with a pork shoulder. I put it in the smoker for 5 hours over hickory and am finishing it in the oven now. I had to do that last time since I couldn't keep the fire going and it turned out great.

So, after 5 hours, I switched to alder wood and put a salmon and trout on.
Smoked an 8 pound pork shoulder on Saturday. Golf was out for the day with lousy weather, so I decided to go lower than normal (225-250). Put it on the smoker at 9 AM and it was on for 11 hours. It was delicious and I love when the smoker runs all day.

Used the pulled pork for breakfast on Sunday with a modified version of Loco Moco using pulled pork instead of spam.

Sunday I smoked a fatty. Kept it simple by rolling out the sausage, seasoning both sides with a dry rub and added some deli ham, onions and some shredded cheese. Roll it back up, and smoked it low (225) with some hickory and pecan.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
Sunday I smoked a fatty. Kept it simple by rolling out the sausage, seasoning both sides with a dry rub and added some deli ham, onions and some shredded cheese. Roll it back up, and smoked it low (225) with some hickory and pecan.

I've done the same, but have you tried it inside a bacon weave? dance
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
Sunday I smoked a fatty. Kept it simple by rolling out the sausage, seasoning both sides with a dry rub and added some deli ham, onions and some shredded cheese. Roll it back up, and smoked it low (225) with some hickory and pecan.

I've done the same, but have you tried it inside a bacon weave? dance


or coring out the bone of a ham and putting said sausage inside after wrapping it in bacon?
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
Sunday I smoked a fatty. Kept it simple by rolling out the sausage, seasoning both sides with a dry rub and added some deli ham, onions and some shredded cheese. Roll it back up, and smoked it low (225) with some hickory and pecan.

I've done the same, but have you tried it inside a bacon weave? dance


I have done the bacon weave, but making everybody sign a waiver before eating it was getting to be a bother. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
Sunday I smoked a fatty. Kept it simple by rolling out the sausage, seasoning both sides with a dry rub and added some deli ham, onions and some shredded cheese. Roll it back up, and smoked it low (225) with some hickory and pecan.

I've done the same, but have you tried it inside a bacon weave? dance


I have done the bacon weave, but making everybody sign a waiver before eating it was getting to be a bother. Big Grin

True, there is that. Razz
I made some Char Siu tonight. I normally cook it indirect on my Weber kettle with some sugar maple wood for smoke. This time I went direct to give it a nice char, no smoke. Also tweaked my marinade recipe, substituting candied ginger slices for grated, and agave syrup for the honey. Big improvement, imo.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I made some Char Siu tonight. I normally cook it indirect on my Weber kettle with some sugar maple wood for smoke. This time I went direct to give it a nice char, no smoke. Also tweaked my marinade recipe, substituting candied ginger slices for grated, and agave syrup for the honey. Big improvement, imo.


do you use Chinese five spice in your marinade?

Would be curious to get that recipe. I love making Char Siu and have experimented with a few different recipes in the past
my char siu sauce recipe involves 3 main things
-fermented red bean curd
-shaoxing wine
-5 spice

my five spice
is predominantly crushed white peppercorn and sichaun peppercorn,
with hints of anise, cloves, black pepper

Variations then will be:
dark soy
honey
rice vinegar

or
a more cornstarch base which would be
simple syrup,
cornstarch
soy sauce
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
my char siu sauce recipe involves 3 main things
-fermented red bean curd
-shaoxing wine
-5 spice

my five spice
is predominantly crushed white peppercorn and sichaun peppercorn,
with hints of anise, cloves, black pepper

Variations then will be:
dark soy
honey
rice vinegar

or
a more cornstarch base which would be
simple syrup,
cornstarch
soy sauce


have used red bean curd in the past to get the color (vs. red food dye some recipes call for which I have generally just left out)

Like the home-made 5-spice approach. I have tended to omit because store bought versions can have too much concentration of anise and cloves

For my marinade, I have generally used rice wine vinegar, ketchup (yup, ketchup), hoisin sauce, light soy sauce, honey and cane (or brown) sugar with white and black pepper (occasionally five spice)
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
my char siu sauce recipe involves 3 main things
-fermented red bean curd
-shaoxing wine
-5 spice

my five spice
is predominantly crushed white peppercorn and sichaun peppercorn,
with hints of anise, cloves, black pepper

Variations then will be:
dark soy
honey
rice vinegar

or
a more cornstarch base which would be
simple syrup,
cornstarch
soy sauce


have used red bean curd in the past to get the color (vs. red food dye some recipes call for which I have generally just left out)

Like the home-made 5-spice approach. I have tended to omit because store bought versions can have too much concentration of anise and cloves

For my marinade, I have generally used rice wine vinegar, ketchup (yup, ketchup), hoisin sauce, light soy sauce, honey and cane (or brown) sugar with white and black pepper (occasionally five spice)


let's just throw the kitchen sink at your pork!! =)

haha seriously if you're going to mix it up like that, i'd say save the trouble and just add some MSG and tomato paste!!!!

Crushed white peppercorn, in my opinion, is one of the best spices for pork. It's just awesome. like beef and back pepper, pork and white pepper.

Hoisin though is weird because you get all of the ingredients (minux maybe teh sweet potato starch) from the ingreident list you have.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
my char siu sauce recipe involves 3 main things
-fermented red bean curd
-shaoxing wine
-5 spice

my five spice
is predominantly crushed white peppercorn and sichaun peppercorn,
with hints of anise, cloves, black pepper

Variations then will be:
dark soy
honey
rice vinegar

or
a more cornstarch base which would be
simple syrup,
cornstarch
soy sauce


have used red bean curd in the past to get the color (vs. red food dye some recipes call for which I have generally just left out)

Like the home-made 5-spice approach. I have tended to omit because store bought versions can have too much concentration of anise and cloves

For my marinade, I have generally used rice wine vinegar, ketchup (yup, ketchup), hoisin sauce, light soy sauce, honey and cane (or brown) sugar with white and black pepper (occasionally five spice)


let's just throw the kitchen sink at your pork!! =)

haha seriously if you're going to mix it up like that, i'd say save the trouble and just add some MSG and tomato paste!!!!

Crushed white peppercorn, in my opinion, is one of the best spices for pork. It's just awesome. like beef and back pepper, pork and white pepper.

Hoisin though is weird because you get all of the ingredients (minux maybe teh sweet potato starch) from the ingreident list you have.


I have to admit I never exactly knew what was in soy sauce but just considered it an sweet sauce that could aid in thickening. Just did some googling and saw that you are exactly right . . . The proportions of things I have been using don't exactly make a hoisin sauce but the hoisin itself is redundant because it is already represented in my ingredients . . . one ingredient gone!
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I made some Char Siu tonight. I normally cook it indirect on my Weber kettle with some sugar maple wood for smoke. This time I went direct to give it a nice char, no smoke. Also tweaked my marinade recipe, substituting candied ginger slices for grated, and agave syrup for the honey. Big improvement, imo.


do you use Chinese five spice in your marinade?

Would be curious to get that recipe. I love making Char Siu and have experimented with a few different recipes in the past



I use very little five spice in mine. To me, a little goes a long way, and when I'm walking through our Chinatown district, I can smell the five spice out on the streets.

This may be a "kitchen sink" approach, but it comes the closest to the best I've had in a local Chinese restaurant known for their bbq.

Char Siu

1/4 c. soy sauce
1/4 c. Yoshida's Gourmet sauce
1/2 c. mirin
1/2 c. Hoisin sauce
1/2 c. brown sugar
4 T. maltose
1 T. agave syrup or honey
1 t. minced garlic
3-4 slices of candied ginger
1/8-1/2 t. Five Spice powder (depends on your taste)
1/2 t. sesame oil
1 t. red food coloring (I like it RED) but this is optional

1 t. cure #1
1/2 pork loin, sliced into long 2-1/2" x 2-1/2 strips, or 4-6 pork tenderloin.

Recipe updated 11-13-18

Heat all ingredients (except cure #1) in a saucepan till maltose dissolves. (You will need to heat it just to get the maltose off your spoon. It is insanely thick and sticky, almost like a malleable plastic, but don't substitute anything for it. It is the glue that adheres the sauce to the meat.)
If using pork loin, make sure to remove all silverskin from the meat. I remove the fat also, but that is a personal preference.
Cool, and then add the cure #1. Pour over meat in large ziploc bag. Let rest in refrigerator overnight, or up to 3-4 days.
Makes about 2-1/4 cups.

quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I made some Char Siu tonight. I normally cook it indirect on my Weber kettle with some sugar maple wood for smoke. This time I went direct to give it a nice char, no smoke. Also tweaked my marinade recipe, substituting candied ginger slices for grated, and agave syrup for the honey. Big improvement, imo.


do you use Chinese five spice in your marinade?

Would be curious to get that recipe. I love making Char Siu and have experimented with a few different recipes in the past


I use very little five spice in mine. To me, a little goes a long way, and when I'm walking through our Chinatown district, I can smell the five spice out on the streets.

This may be a "kitchen sink" approach, but it comes the closest to the best I've had in a local Chinese restaurant known for their bbq.

Char Siu

1/4 c. soy sauce
1/4 c. Yoshida's Gourmet sauce
1/2 c. mirin
1/2 c. Hoisin sauce
1/2 c. brown sugar
4 T. maltose
1 T. agave syrup or honey
1 t. minced garlic
3-4 slices of candied ginger
1/8-1/2 t. Five Spice powder (depends on your taste)
1/2 t. sesame oil
1 t. red food coloring (I like it RED) but this is optional
1/2 pork loin, sliced into long 2-1/2" x 2-1/2 strips, or 4-6 pork tenderloin.

Recipe updated 5-28-16

Heat all ingredients in a saucepan till maltose dissolves. (You will need to heat it just to get the maltose off your spoon. It is insanely thick and sticky, almost like a malleable plastic, but don't substitute anything for it. It is the glue that adheres the sauce to the meat.)
If using pork loin, make sure to remove all silverskin from the meat. I remove the fat also, but that is a personal preference.
Cool, and pour over meat in large ziploc bag. Let rest in refrigerator overnight, or up to 3-4 days.
Makes about 2-1/4 cups.


Thanks . . . this is going to be dinner next Friday. Will report back.

Now just need to procure some maltose. Do you have any experience substituting corn syrup for the maltose?
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I made some Char Siu tonight. I normally cook it indirect on my Weber kettle with some sugar maple wood for smoke. This time I went direct to give it a nice char, no smoke. Also tweaked my marinade recipe, substituting candied ginger slices for grated, and agave syrup for the honey. Big improvement, imo.


do you use Chinese five spice in your marinade?

Would be curious to get that recipe. I love making Char Siu and have experimented with a few different recipes in the past


I use very little five spice in mine. To me, a little goes a long way, and when I'm walking through our Chinatown district, I can smell the five spice out on the streets.

This may be a "kitchen sink" approach, but it comes the closest to the best I've had in a local Chinese restaurant known for their bbq.

Char Siu

1/4 c. soy sauce
1/4 c. Yoshida's Gourmet sauce
1/2 c. mirin
1/2 c. Hoisin sauce
1/2 c. brown sugar
4 T. maltose
1 T. agave syrup or honey
1 t. minced garlic
3-4 slices of candied ginger
1/8-1/2 t. Five Spice powder (depends on your taste)
1/2 t. sesame oil
1 t. red food coloring (I like it RED) but this is optional
1/2 pork loin, sliced into long 2-1/2" x 2-1/2 strips, or 4-6 pork tenderloin.

Recipe updated 5-28-16

Heat all ingredients in a saucepan till maltose dissolves. (You will need to heat it just to get the maltose off your spoon. It is insanely thick and sticky, almost like a malleable plastic, but don't substitute anything for it. It is the glue that adheres the sauce to the meat.)
If using pork loin, make sure to remove all silverskin from the meat. I remove the fat also, but that is a personal preference.
Cool, and pour over meat in large ziploc bag. Let rest in refrigerator overnight, or up to 3-4 days.
Makes about 2-1/4 cups.


Thanks . . . this is going to be dinner next Friday. Will report back.

Now just need to procure some maltose. Do you have any experience substituting corn syrup for the maltose?


i thgouth maltose is corn syrup?

ever try cornstarch as a substitute for maltose?

or molasses (but lessen the amount of sugar in the other ingredients)
Maltose is a little different than corn syrup . . .

Maltose sugar is (wait for it) maltose. Corn syrup is fructose. But, your point is a good one. I think you could use corn syrup and decrease sugar in other components of the recipe because fructose is sweeter than maltose.

Molasses could work but would change the flavor profile of the sauce

anyway, I'm going to go the corn-syrup route and reduce brown sugar to 1/3 cup (totally random decrease but want to preserve the amount of corn syrup at original maltose amount for consistency purposes)
quote:
Originally posted by Parcival:
Maltose is a little different than corn syrup . . .

Maltose sugar is (wait for it) maltose. Corn syrup is fructose. But, your point is a good one. I think you could use corn syrup and decrease sugar in other components of the recipe because fructose is sweeter than maltose.

Molasses could work but would change the flavor profile of the sauce

anyway, I'm going to go the corn-syrup route and reduce brown sugar to 1/3 cup (totally random decrease but want to preserve the amount of corn syrup at original maltose amount for consistency purposes)


http://www.livestrong.com/arti...n-syrup-bad-for-you/

whats high maltose corn syrup then?
It's certainly up to you what you put in it, but imo, the maltose is one of the principle ingredients in the dish. It is much, much thicker than honey, corn syrup, or molasses. It has the look and consistency of fiberglass resin; hard to believe it is edible at all, but I have had the best results using it.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
It's certainly up to you what you put in it, but imo, the maltose is one of the principle ingredients in the dish. It is much, much thicker than honey, corn syrup, or molasses. It has the look and consistency of fiberglass resin; hard to believe it is edible at all, but I have had the best results using it.


Cost of entry was pretty easy (~$6) so going to be making this on Friday using your recipe. Will give an update over the weekend
Did a high heat brisket over oak on Memorial Day. Ran the smoker at about 360-375 rather than traditional 225-275. Delicious with some grilled bread, grilled corn and a watermelon and mint salad. First time I've done a high heat brisky, and I'm not sure if I'm sold on the method.

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