“The Power” by Naomi Alderman.  Interesting concept how the roles of men and women are reversed spurred solely by a shift in physical power towards women over men.  It’s a bit jumpy from character to character in the book and gets a bit far fetched in my opinion towards the end of the book but still a quick, easy read.  Read it because it is the book of the month for the PBS NewsHour. On a five star rating system I’d give it a 3 ½ star rating if I could award half stars. Somewhere between liked it and really liked it for me.

“Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations” by Thomas L. Friedman. I didn’t like this book. To me it read like a doctoral candidate in sociology wrote an extensive outline for his upcoming thesis and then a retired journalist filled in the blanks through 40 plus years stream of consciousness. The first and last chapters were good and I enjoyed them but everything in between I struggled greatly to maintain interest in the book. I almost quit it several times. I probably should have. Not every book is for every reader and I’ll chalk it up to that.

“Sideways” by Rex Pickett.  I saw the movie years ago when it was released but never bothered reading the book.  Finally decided to read the trilogy in order starting with Sideways. The book was fun and entertaining although there are some fairly significant differences between it and the screenplay for the movie.  All and all still fun, even after all these years of finally getting to it.

thelostverse posted:

The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon.  I've had this in my kindle for some time, but always put it off for something else.  About halfway through right now and enjoying it immensely. 

Thanks for the recommendation.  Have you read any of his other novels?

“Uncommon Type: Some Stories” by Tom Hanks. Kind of different, kind of fun, finally reading a collection of short stories for the first time in years quite literally. Some stories were truly entertaining, others less so, all with one obvious common thread throughout. If you like short stories or if simply like something you can pick up and read a “chapter” quick and easy between other activities might be a good one for you to check out of your local library.

“The Bell Jar” by Sylvia Plath.  I’ve always meant to read this widely regarded modern classic.  I see the lure and appeal to this semi-autobiographical account of Sylvia Plath’s life.  Exceeding depressing and as some critics have pointed out somewhat predictable I merely enjoyed it for what it is.  It didn’t speak to me or move me particularly.

“The Woman in the Window” by A.J. Finn.  Interesting book. I like the bite sized chunks of each chapter coming in 1-8 pages in length.  Made it easy to read here and there and almost mimicked how the main character’s mind must have been chopped up and rarely able to focus for more than minutes at a time.  Some interesting twists and suspense towards the end. Recommended.

haggis posted:
thelostverse posted:

The Shadow of the Wind - Carlos Ruiz Zafon.  I've had this in my kindle for some time, but always put it off for something else.  About halfway through right now and enjoying it immensely. 

Thanks for the recommendation.  Have you read any of his other novels?

Based on this, I just started this book as well.  In very early chapters, but seems quite promising.

“Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland” by Patrick Radden Keefe. Good book. I’ve followed the happenings in Northern Ireland at a distance over the past 40 years or so but this book provided quite a bit of depth and background details I didn’t really know having casually followed it over the years. Recommended if you’d like to know more about “The Troubles” in Northern Ireland. By the way, only 348 pages of reading. There are over 100 pages of references cited at the end of the book along with the Acknowledgements. Not as lengthy of a read as it seems on the surface.

“The Second Mountain” by David Brooks. It was a good book chocked full of ideas and inspiration. Unfortunately at least for me it read like David Brook speaks when you hear him on television. This low toned, almost monochromatic stream of ideas that lack any serious emotional punch. It was worth the investment in time for me but definitely a “one and done” kind of a read for me. My two cents worth.

“The Storm on Our Shores: One Island, Two Soldiers, and the Forgotten Battle of World War II” by Mark Obmascik. I liked this book. Being a fan of war related books, particularly set during World War II, Korea and Vietnam, this book was right up my alley. Quick and easy read, I had a hard time putting it down and finished it up in two days over the Memorial Day holiday weekend. If you’re into this genre I’d give it a read.

“Leadership: In Turbulent Times” by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Good book. Well written. As always with this author well document and seeded in facts. I appreciate the comparison of leadership qualities across four great American presidents over multiple generations and centuries. Recommended.

“The Elephant in the Room: One Fat Man’s Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America” by Tommy Tomilson. Good book. I really enjoyed this quick and easy read. As a man growing up in southern America myself and having struggled off and on with my weight throughout my life I can see myself in several things the author has pointed out in this book. I can also very much empathize with the situation so many obese Americans find themselves in. If you’ve ever struggled with your weight or have a close friend or family member that constantly struggles or simply want a quick read to motivate you to get up off the couch and go for a simple walk around your block then you should read this book.

wineismylife posted:

“Leadership: In Turbulent Times” by Doris Kearns Goodwin. Good book. Well written. As always with this author well document and seeded in facts. I appreciate the comparison of leadership qualities across four great American presidents over multiple generations and centuries. Recommended.

Thanks for the recommendation Joe. My local library has the e-version and I just borrowed it.

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