What are you reading?

Found my copy of the play, Picasso at the Lapin Agile last night while looking for something else.

I could not sleep at all last night, so cover to cover once again.

Montmartre must have been something to behold at the turn of the 20th century with the likes of Picasso, Dali, Modigliani, Mondrian, van Gogh, Degas, Toulouse, Braque, Gris, Apollinaire, Jacob, Gertrude and Cocteau just to name a few. Cool
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Originally posted by winetarelli:
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Originally posted by wine+art:
As I Lay Dying

My third revisit to one of America's greatest novels of all-time.

Actually... my favorite American novel. I read it when I was 16 and I've never read one I liked as much.


I never knew that.

Easily top 100 American novel, ever.
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Originally posted by thelostverse:
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Originally posted by Ed Bowers [i.e. FlWino]:
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Originally posted by snipes:
Threat Vector - Tom Clancy


How is it? Thinking of buying for iPad


If you like Clancy, you'd probably like this. I enjoyed it and thought it was worth the read.


Ditto. Finished last night - Kindle edition. A very good Clancy book and one I had trouble putting down. I'm going to seek out more by his co-author.
Better Off Without Em by Chuck Thompson
You southern boys ought to skip this one (or buy all of the books and burn them). Totally skewers the South for race, relegion, politics, college football, and just about everything southern. His premise is the country would be better off if we'd let you seceeded. Roll Eyes
My interest in the American Civil War has been piqued again recently. I just finished a book on Shiloh, read some of McPherson's Battle Cry of Freedom again (this is really one of the best history books I've read), and am now starting on a series of battle books about the overland campaign in 1864 on a long, long trip I'm taking.
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Originally posted by aphilla:
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
The day of battle - the war in Sicily and Italy '43-44, Atkinson. Brutal stuff.


An Army at Dawn was really good, but I didn't care for this one much. Not sure I'm motivated to read the last one now.

Agreed the first is better, but it will not preclude me from reading the third.
Charles Rosen
A Short Companion to Beethoven's Piano Sonatas

Pretty interesting. If you don't know what the tonic, dominant, and subdominant are, you're probably going to have a rough time of it as he assumes his readers (lectures given to piano students) know a fair bit of music theory.

If I'd known that Andras Schiff's lectures on the sonatas were online I probably wouldn't have bought this.
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
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Originally posted by aphilla:
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Originally posted by Jabe11:
The day of battle - the war in Sicily and Italy '43-44, Atkinson. Brutal stuff.


An Army at Dawn was really good, but I didn't care for this one much. Not sure I'm motivated to read the last one now.

Agreed the first is better, but it will not preclude me from reading the third.


One of the things I liked most about the first one was the kind of global political backdrop to what was going on, especially the stories about Churchill and Roosevelt. If you liked that about the book, you might look into getting your hands on _The Burma Campaign_ by McLynn (I think?). A lot of that is around the personalities of the local commanders and their interactions with their bosses and Chiang Kai-Shek. Fascinating.
I looked for the burma book and the civil war history you mentioned up above and...was hesitant to buy as we have an iPad, and both were for other proprietary reader devices (nook and Kindle). I guess all it takes is a few bucks to buy one test it, but i still paused nonetheless...silly, i guess. I'm still not sold on a digital reader; a hard copy is much more comfort in hand.

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