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@mneeley490 posted:

One that's been on my "to read" list for many years, but I'm finally getting around to it now. Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead.

While Frank Lloyd Wright is clearly the model for Roark (though Wright was always a popular architect) less discussed is Henry Cameron is based on Wright's mentor Louis Sullivan. Like Cameron, Sullivan looked for an American style of architecture not based on historical precedents. His form of architecture stalled when the Chicago world's fair of 1893 triggered a massive Greek Revival building tread across the US. This, and his alcoholism, saw his career fade away. Wright helped him financially during this time.

I always thought it would make a great mini-series (the movie is most unfortunate.) It's got everything including a fetishistic form of sex in which ***Spoiler alert*** Dominique will only sleep with Roark when she stymies his career (nobody is good enough for his talent.) It doesn't get kinkier than that. However to read Rand means skipping, or ignoring, much of her philosophical writings in the book.

@The Old Man posted:

While Frank Lloyd Wright is clearly the model for Roark (though Wright was always a popular architect) less discussed is Henry Cameron is based on Wright's mentor Louis Sullivan. Like Cameron, Sullivan looked for an American style of architecture not based on historical precedents. His form of architecture stalled when the Chicago world's fair of 1893 triggered a massive Greek Revival building tread across the US. This, and his alcoholism, saw his career fade away. Wright helped him financially during this time.

I always thought it would make a great mini-series (the movie is most unfortunate.) It's got everything including a fetishistic form of sex in which ***Spoiler alert*** Dominique will only sleep with Roark when she stymies his career (nobody is good enough for his talent.) It doesn't get kinkier than that. However to read Rand means skipping, or ignoring, much of her philosophical writings in the book.

Interesting background, thanks. I must confess I somehow managed to get through college without ever reading (or debating) her works, so I'm coming into it with little knowledge of Rand. I'm thinking that might be a plus, as I can read it "clean" so to speak, without all the baggage.

“Imperfect Union: How Jessie and John Frémont Mapped the West, Invented Celebrity, and Helped Cause the Civil War” by Steve Inskeep.  Pretty interesting book.  I’ve seen the name Fremont many times in my travels, particularly throughout the west from New Mexico up through Northern California and points between.  It is nice to get some background on the name and why so many places are named Fremont.  I didn’t know the full story beforehand.  Worth a read, particularly if you’re into American history.

"Our Riches," by Kaouther Adimi.  It's a very short historical novelette rooted it the French-Algerian conflict and revolves around the real bookstore in Algiers that was a gathering place of some of the great names of literature (particuarly Camus).   A beautiful translation from the French by an author who was born in Algiers.  She brings a real sense of place and of the people.  This is a short read. It's only about 150 pp.  I read it in an afternoon.  Recommended.

“Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes with Insulin” by Gary Scheiner.  I have type 2 diabetes.  I’ve wanted for quite a while to learn more about diabetes, the effects of diet and exercise, highs and lows and such.  Although this book is written primarily oriented towards living with type 1 diabetes utilizing insulin to control your diabetes it is chocked full of type 2 information as well as diabetes information in general.  A dry read particularly if you’re not interested in the subject matter well worth the garnering of information in this short format book.

“Firing Blancs” by Peter Stafford-Bow.  The continuing adventures of Felix Hart, the intrepid wine buyer and wine minstrel of the Felix Hart novels.  In this third installment of the series he returns to the winelands and townships of South Africa.  Chocked full of humorous episodes highlighted by Peter Stafford-Bow’s witty prose, this installment is a thoroughly enjoyable addition to the series.  Recommend as a quick, humorous read.  Particularly if you’re seriously into wine and need to laugh a little.

@grapeguru posted:

currently reading Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger,. The book is very interesting, I recommend everyone to read it. If you're not sure if you want to read this, you can check out some articles and reviews on the book at studydriver.com/catcher-in-the-rye-essay/. I think this will interest you even more and encourage you to read.

I cannot speak for everyone but this was pretty much on every reading list in high school from the sixties on.

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