purplehaze posted:
Rothko posted:

I finished Book 1 of The Dark Tower series.  Can't say I enjoyed it too much; sort of dull.  I don't think I'm going to continue the series.

Volume #1 was by far the weakest of the bunch.  I know I didn't regret picking the series up again.

PH

+1  Perhaps it's just not for you, although I completely agree with PH that book 1 was the least enjoyable of the series.

“Before We Were Yours” by Lisa Wingate.  Fictional work set against the historic backdrop of the Tennessee Children’s Home Society scandal.  The fictional sisters and brother woven into this story line were completely believable and well constructed against this historical setting.  Good book. Easy and quick read.

“True Colors” by Kristin Hannah.  Seemed a bit formulated as in following the "Kristin Hannah formula" as I'll dub it but it had an interesting enough background of ranching, horses, growing up in a small town where everybody is in your business, etc...to keep me interested.  Definitely more of a “Chick Lit” kind of a story than her recent novels that I enjoyed more but it kept me entertained for four days.

Finished Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson.  To be honest, most of it was my least favorite of the series but the ending was friggin' fantastic.  So was worth slogging through the boring Shallan chapters for that ending.  Outstanding.

Started Crazy Rich Asians  - which FKG made me read.  I cannot say I am enjoying it much,

Halfway through the new Steven King novel.  OK so far.  Starts out with what would likely be every suburban father/coach/citizen's absolute worst nightmare.  Halfway through, a MAJOR curveball.  Now it's getting more "Steven King-ish," after a pretty non -supernatural beginning.  Will be interesting to see how this one ends up.  I do like Steven King.  I find him a very compelling storyteller.

PH

Give Me a Break - John Stossel.  I have always liked Stossel, he is a bit of a contrarian and tries to look at things from a rational perspective, where many people are looking things at an emotional perspective.  He starts on things from a consumer perspective and gets into things that involve government and the capitalist system.  He is a libertarian and is good at challenging the conventional "wisdom".  This is really a good read and I would challenge anyone to read and see how Stossel's views jibe with theirs.  I guarantee that it will challenge both the left and right perspectives on things.  Although the book was published a little while back, it is still very much relevant.  Challenge your views and read this.

purplehaze posted:

Halfway through the new Steven King novel.  OK so far.  Starts out with what would likely be every suburban father/coach/citizen's absolute worst nightmare.  Halfway through, a MAJOR curveball.  Now it's getting more "Steven King-ish," after a pretty non -supernatural beginning.  Will be interesting to see how this one ends up.  I do like Steven King.  I find him a very compelling storyteller.

PH

Finished this a few days back.  Not bad, but certainly not one of his best.  B.

PH

 

“A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership.” by James Comey.  Interesting read. Nothing new to learn here if you’ve been well versed on current events over the past couple of years.  No ground breaking secrets. Just a good synopsis from Comey’s point of view. Good background on what shaped him as an individual.  I enjoyed reading it in about 48 hours but I am glad I waited for it from the library. No need to add it to your library in my humble opinion.  Sorry James.

“The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien.  Interesting read. I call it “read” because it isn’t quite a novel, not quite a collection of short stories.  It’s more like a recollection of memories woven together across three distinct time frames of the characters in the book: their time in Vietnam, their childhood and two decades after they returned from Vietnam.  Unusual format that incredibly reads easily and well. I enjoyed it.

jcocktosten posted:
purplehaze posted:

Just finished The Other Woman by Daniel Silva.  Another in his great series featuring Gabriel Allon.  Lots of current events woven into a fun story that covers a lot of history as well.  Fun stuff!

PH

Nice - love the series

If you have a Kindle, glad to loan it to you.  Apparently you can loan a book out to a friend for up to 2 weeks.  This one had a little more "plot" and a little less action than the typical Gabriel Allon adventure.  Still liked it a lot.

PH

purplehaze posted:

100 pages into The Shadow of the Wind, by Carlos Ruiz Zafón.  So far, I'm quite smitten.  Beautiful writing. and compelling story  And, any book that starts out  a visit to "The Cemetery of Forgotten Books," hast to be good!

PH 

Fantastic book! I loved it.

 

Currently reading Deadhouse Gates by Steven Erikson, and about to give Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood a go.

sunnylea57 posted:

I Will Be Complete by Glen David Gold. It's the new memoir by the author of Carter Beats the Devil (NYT best seller from a number of years ago). Glen is a fellow wine lover who introduced me to Cellartracker, which in turn led me here. 

I love Glen's writing. Here's a recent sample from the New York Times a few weeks ago:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/0...by-living-apart.html

Read this book. No really, read this book. Glen's story is a jaw-dropper. Just one example: at age 12 his mother disappeared across the country and left him on his own for a "day or two" which turned into months. As compelling as the story is, it's the writing that will grab you: beautifully spare and unsentimental, but also both heartbreaking and hilarious. A phenomenal achievement.

“Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man’s Fight for Justice” by Bill Browder.  I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Being a trained accountant and a lifelong investor this true story really hit the mark with me.  It reads like a suspense novel throughout yet is a true life account that led to the eventual passage of the Magnitsky Act. If you’re into politics and in particular keeping up with current U.S.-Russian politics this is a must read for background information related to recent events (aka Trump Tower Meeting).  Quick and easy read. Recommended.

wineismylife posted:

“Red Notice: A True Story of High Finance, Murder, and One Man’s Fight for Justice” by Bill Browder.  I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Being a trained accountant and a lifelong investor this true story really hit the mark with me.  It reads like a suspense novel throughout yet is a true life account that led to the eventual passage of the Magnitsky Act. If you’re into politics and in particular keeping up with current U.S.-Russian politics this is a must read for background information related to recent events (aka Trump Tower Meeting).  Quick and easy read. Recommended.

This is the same guy Putin wants back in Russia.  A real thief etc.

Suicide of the West by Jonah Goldberg - a well written and almost scholarly effort (many resources quoted) by Goldberg, a classical conservative, about issues that our nation is facing and the threats they pose.  Written in a manner that a conservative or liberal can read even if one may not agree with all of the views posed by the author.  By no means a screed by a biased person.

“Fourth Uncle in the Mountain: A Memoir of a Barefoot Doctor in Vietnam” by Marjorie Pivar & Quang Van Nguyen.  Interesting book. Somebody online in a thread on one of the forum I frequent recommended this book so I tossed it on my to-read shelf on a whim.  This book is completely outside my normal reading zone. Vietnam culture from French Colonial times to roughly a decade after the end of the Vietnam War.  All from the viewpoint of citizens, mostly traditional Vietnamese doctors, monks and spiritual people. Traditional Chinese medicine, meditation towards enlightenment, a real mixed bag.  I found it refreshing and a quick way to reset myself from my normal reading themes. I enjoyed it.

purplehaze posted:

Just finished The Other Woman by Daniel Silva.  Another in his great series featuring Gabriel Allon.  Lots of current events woven into a fun story that covers a lot of history as well.  Fun stuff!

PH

I just finished this today - loved it like all the others.  I am wondering how much further they can take Gabriel unless they visit the past and delve into other events from his youth. 

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