quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I just started Book 1 of Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series - "The Gunslinger"

I've heard good things about the series. We shall see.


I hope you are reading the revised version of book one. It's a much better version than the original. If not, you may have to struggle through the first 100 Pages or so. Stay with it, and you will be rewarded.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership by James Comey.

...Let me know your thoughts please


Just finished up. Nothing in there regarding "he who shall not be named" that you haven't already heard or read.

I think it does a nice job giving background on Comey's life and the previous experiences that have shaped him. I came away with a few things:

1) He does come off as a sanctimonious Boy Scout.

2) I found him 100% credible.

3) There is no doubt in my mind that he was under pressure (with his job security on the "menu") to make a claim of loyalty to ________ during that unprecedented one-on-one dinner.

For $18, I'd say give it a shot.

PH

Maybe send it to Napacat along with a Starbucks gift card.


Touché...very funny, well done!
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I just started Book 1 of Stephen King's "Dark Tower" series - "The Gunslinger"

I've heard good things about the series. We shall see.


I hope you are reading the revised version of book one. It's a much better version than the original. If not, you may have to struggle through the first 100 Pages or so. Stay with it, and you will be rewarded.

PH


Yes, I believe that I am. The Foreward of the book is written by King, detailing why he did a revision.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:

Yes, I believe that I am. The Foreward of the book is written by King, detailing why he did a revision.


Ah... good. When I first picked up the (original) The Gunslinger I actually quit after 50 or so pages. Just didn't get into it at all. I've never done this with anything by King before or since. A year or so later, with absolutely nothing to read in the house, I picked it up and powered through the beginning.

It's one of my favorite series of all time.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:

Yes, I believe that I am. The Foreward of the book is written by King, detailing why he did a revision.


Ah... good. When I first picked up the (original) The Gunslinger I actually quit after 50 or so pages. Just didn't get into it at all. I've never done this with anything by King before or since. A year or so later, with absolutely nothing to read in the house, I picked it up and powered through the beginning.

It's one of my favorite series of all time.

PH


This is exactly what I did too. It bugged me for a couple of years that I didn't finish it, so I went back and bit the bullet. Glad I did.
“No Turning Back: Life, Loss, and Hope in Wartime Syria”
by Rania Abouzeid. Interesting book. The author follows several every day Syrians over about a six year period. Average citizens that mostly wanted to just live a safe and secure life and earn a living instead upended by the multi faction war being raged around them. Hard not to be impacted if read openly and honestly with empathy. If you want to learn more about the Syrian Civil War as related by those most impacted by it’s events this would be a good read for you. Recommended.
I've been reading the Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Juster, illustrated by Jules Fieffer, to my kids at bedtime. Great book and so fun to read as an adult. Fond memories of my dad reading this to me and my oldest sister.

Ive been working 50-60 hours a week so haven't been reading too much. Regardless, rereading a couple of select volumes from Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin series about a frigate captain and his best friend, surgeon and intelligence agent in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic wars. I cannot recommend this series highly enough if you are into war novels and intrigue. Skillfully crafted, exceptionally told, and impeccably accurate, from an historical aspect. I've got the Ionian Mission by my bedside.
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
For Whom the Bell Tolls


This is a great book. I also like The Sun Also Rises. If you're up for it, find Hemingway's A Moveable Feast about the years he spent in Paris. He wrote The Sun Also Rises sitting outside at La Closerie de Lilas in Paris and describes drinking muscadet, eating oysters, and writing his book there. Good times. I tried telling this story to my nieces when we were there, but then they saw Johnny Depp's signature on the famous customers sheet and it was all over....


Incredulously, I ended up having a copy of A Moveable Feast - found recently - as I've moved internationally 6 times in the last 14 years and have purged so many books. I've got it on deck.

Where is aphilla anyways?
I just finished The Conjurer’s Bird, by Martin Davies.

It is a fascinating historical novel about Joseph Banks (the famous 18th century botanist who achieved fame and fortune thanks to his collections during Capt. Cook's first voyage) and the elusive bird of Ulieta (Raiatea starling or bay thrush). One bird was collected during Cook's second voyage and ended up in Banks' collection. The preserved bird has not been seen since and the species is presumed extinct.

Davies masterfully fills in gaps in what we know about Banks and the bird. Chapters alternate between a contemporary fictional story of a search for the missing bird with some (re)construction of what might have happened following Banks’ possession of the bird.

It’s a good story, well researched, and the historical aspects are completely accurate. I was not sure if some of the old letters and facts quoted were actually true, but I did some reading on Banks and his voyage with Cook and they accurate. It’s a fascinating quest, mystery, and love story.

I read it in a day and a half.
“Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI” by David Grann. I really liked this book. Real life who done it kind of a book. Covers regional topics I’m interested in such as Native Americans, the Osage people and their lands surrounding Pawhuska, OK. A quick and easy read. Different than a lot of stuff I’ve been reading lately. Recommended.

Just finished Beartown by Fredrik Backman for my wife's book club (spouses join once a year).  I wouldn't recommend the book and can't believe he just released a sequel.  Novel is decidedly mediocre populated with poorly drawn and cliched characters and actions.  The writing is simplistic and a master course in telling rather than showing.  

Neil

steve8 posted:
thelostverse posted:
gigabit posted:

Catch-22

I'm not sure I'll continue much further.

One of my favorite books of all time. 

Same here. Stick with it Gig.

I should reread this. It was a favourite of mine in high school, as was The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz.

Finally finished Red Seas Under Red Skies (Gentleman Bastards book 2) by Scott Lynch.

I will come back to book 3, but I'm starting King of Ashes: Book One of the Firemane Saga by Raymond Feist.  Feist is one of my favorite authors and this is his first book in five years.

thelostverse posted:

Finally finished Red Seas Under Red Skies (Gentleman Bastards book 2) by Scott Lynch.

I will come back to book 3, but I'm starting King of Ashes: Book One of the Firemane Saga by Raymond Feist.  Feist is one of my favorite authors and this is his first book in five years.

I'm getting pretty close to reading Red Seas...myself.  I try not to read a book from the same author in under six months just to force myself to read around the horn so to speak but I'm almost six months out now from the first book.  I presume you enjoyed it?

wineismylife posted:
thelostverse posted:

Finally finished Red Seas Under Red Skies (Gentleman Bastards book 2) by Scott Lynch.

I will come back to book 3, but I'm starting King of Ashes: Book One of the Firemane Saga by Raymond Feist.  Feist is one of my favorite authors and this is his first book in five years.

I'm getting pretty close to reading Red Seas...myself.  I try not to read a book from the same author in under six months just to force myself to read around the horn so to speak but I'm almost six months out now from the first book.  I presume you enjoyed it?

I really did enjoy it - I actually liked it better than book one. 

I like your idea of reading around the horn as you say, but I find myself trying to read everything by an author once I read one of his books.  I would have started book three, but I've been sitting on this new Feist book for almost a month and I have to finish any book I start before I move onto another book. 

jabe11 posted:
quote:
Originally posted by aphilla:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
For Whom the Bell Tolls


This is a great book. I also like The Sun Also Rises. If you're up for it, find Hemingway's A Moveable Feast about the years he spent in Paris. He wrote The Sun Also Rises sitting outside at La Closerie de Lilas in Paris and describes drinking muscadet, eating oysters, and writing his book there. Good times. I tried telling this story to my nieces when we were there, but then they saw Johnny Depp's signature on the famous customers sheet and it was all over....


Incredulously, I ended up having a copy of A Moveable Feast - found recently - as I've moved internationally 6 times in the last 14 years and have purged so many books. I've got it on deck.

Where is aphilla anyways?

About a year ago my wife read The Paris Wife by Paula McLain, a fiction version of Hemingway's marriage to his first wife, Hadley Richardson, and their time together in Paris. I picked it up, and read it and really enjoyed, then moved on to A Moveable Feast and The Sun Also Rises.  It was an interesting getting the different perspectives on the characters who were featured in the three books. 

Historically I have a tendency to binge read and eventually just stop completely for months at a time.  Lately I've been trying to force myself to mix it up a lot with a constant rotation of authors, genre, etc...  Trying to keep it interesting.  Also trying force myself to only read XX pages per day as well.  Otherwise I'd binge read.

Rothko posted:

I finished Book 1 of The Dark Tower series.  Can't say I enjoyed it too much; sort of dull.  I don't think I'm going to continue the series.

Sad to hear.  I know I had a rocky start with this series, and then it suddenly grabbed me by the cojones.  Try one more in a bit.   Volume #1 was by far the weakest of the bunch.  I know I didn't regret picking the series up again.

PH

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