quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
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Originally posted by Rothko:
Finished The Pagan Lord


Not as much action as he usually shows. Looking forward to the next installment though!


I still enjoyed it. Had to order my copy from England, since it is not being sold in the U.S. for another month.
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
Yes I found it enjoyable as well. I wouldn't mind another Thomas Hook novel either to be honest.

What else have you read by Cornwell?


I have read nothing else by the author except for the Uhtred series. My wife bought me the first book in the series, and I went out and got all the rest.
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
The Count of Monte Cristo-Alexandre Dumas


I picked this up from Audible, and it became one of my favorite novels. The reader was John Lee, who did an excellent job.

I've become a fan of listening to books, and came across The Count after a listening to Jordan's Wheel of Time, and waiting for the last three books to come out after his death.

I've been listening to a lot of Dickens, Dumas, and also liked Scott's Ivanhoe.

Not fiction, but am enjoying a series of lectures by Tim Taylor on Economics.
Glad to hear it...I've never listened to a book on tape, but I spend about an hour every day driving so I wouldn't mind killing some time. Do you find it difficult to follow the story? It seems like the radio is more background noise for me rather than my primary focus...
I do half and half listening to earbuds while walking and then in the car. Not too much problem paying attention. I use my Iphone as a player; the files are downloaded as MP3s and there is an Audible app. One feature is a 30 second rewind, so if my mind wanders, or I need to attend to something else while driving, I can hit rewind.

I listened to the better part of one of the Fire and Ice books. The narrator was great but there were so many characters it was hard to keep track of them. I found it better to read the actual book.
I love them on longer car trips, on air flights, and while working around the house when I can listen for longer stretches without interruption and I can get immersed in the book. It might take you a little while to learn to shut down your thought process and truly focus on the book. When I first started listening to audiobooks, sometimes I'd suddenly realize that I was so lost in my own thoughts, 10 minutes had gone by and I hadn't heard a word of the book.

Tip: Make sure you find unabridged versions of whatever you listen to.

My other comment is that the reader makes all the difference in the world. There are some surprisingly bad readers. You'll know within 5 minutes if it's a voice you can spend 20 or 30 hours with.

One of my favourites was Grapes of Wrath read by the actor Dylan Baker. He channels Henry Fonda, and his phrasing and pacing really captures the spartan poetry of Steinbeck's writing.
quote:
Originally posted by sunnylea57:
I love them on longer car trips, on air flights, and while working around the house when I can listen for longer stretches without interruption and I can get immersed in the book. It might take you a little while to learn to shut down your thought process and truly focus on the book. When I first started listening to audiobooks, sometimes I'd suddenly realize that I was so lost in my own thoughts, 10 minutes had gone by and I hadn't heard a word of the book.

Tip: Make sure you find unabridged versions of whatever you listen to.

My other comment is that the reader makes all the difference in the world. There are some surprisingly bad readers. You'll know within 5 minutes if it's a voice you can spend 20 or 30 hours with.

One of my favourites was Grapes of Wrath read by the actor Dylan Baker. He channels Henry Fonda, and his phrasing and pacing really captures the spartan poetry of Steinbeck's writing.



I will keep this in mind...any other notable readers you have had a good experience with?
It's a funny thing-- I tried a couple of times to listen to audio books on long drives, but found them to be just too distracting. While I can appreciate music in the background, words seem to command my attention. I have a few friends-- the ones who recommended audio books to me-- who love consuming books this way, but for whatever reason it just doesn't work for me. If I listen, I'm distracted; if I don't listen carefully, I forget. A lose-lose in my case. I wish it were not so. Confused
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:

I will keep this in mind...any other notable readers you have had a good experience with?


Frank Muller was fantastic, and if you find anything read by him, it will be good. He was a classically trained actor and did a ton of books - lots of classic novels as well as popular fiction like LeCarre, Grisham, Stephen King, if you like that kind of thing. Sadly, he was in a motorcycle accident 12 years ago and there was severe brain damage. He survived until 2008, I think.

Try perusing the Audies website. It's the annual audiobook awards.

http://www.theaudies.com
Some of the narrators I like -

John Lee - mentioned previously, who read The Count of Monte Cristo, as well as a number of Alastair Reynold's Revelation Space books

Simon Vance - the Stieg Larson Millenium Trilogy, lots of Dickens (David Copperfield, Nicholas Nickleby, Oliver Twist), Dumas' The Three Musketeers

Frank Muller - Dicken's Tale of Two Cities

Michael Kramer - has read most of Brian Sanderson's books, and along with Kate Reading did all of Jordan's Wheel of Time

Patrick Tull - read Patrick O'Brien's Aubrey / Maturin series (Master & Commander, etc). Though other readers have also read the same series and get high marks.

Roy Dotrice is the reader for all of George Martin's Song of Fire & Ice. He is excellent, and if you've already read them, makes for a great "re-read". As I mentioned previously, there are so many characters, I had a hard time keeping track in the audio version.

I've also listened to a lot of non-fiction, biographies, history, general education.

I like Audible for a number of reasons. You don't have tapes, CDs, etc. You download them directly to your phone or Ipod, so I can listen while walking, doing yard work, etc. I plug the phone into my car deck via an aux input, though I realize not all have this option. You sign up, and for $15 get one credit a month which buys just about any book available. A very view cost more than one credit. They have sales with $5 specials and 3 for 2 credits, etc. You own them for life, so can re-download if you want to listen to again.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Her Red Hair Rises With The Wings Of Insects, by Catherine Graham.

Very different poetry than I have read from Graham in the past, and really captivating. I'm going to read again as I'm sure I will enjoy even more the second time.

I am also a fan of Graham's work. Agreed it can sometimes be a bit opaque on first reading but have learned not to try and answer the question "what's this poem about?" but just enjoy the music on the page.
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Originally posted by billhike:
I recently finished House of Mondavi. Somewhat depressing...


Agreed. I did think it was well written though.

Have you read Napa: The Story of an American Eden? It's probably my favorite book with respect to the period.
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Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
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Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
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Originally posted by E A Bowers [FlWino]:
Killing Jesus


a.k.a The Bible??


I think it is Bill O'Reilly's latest either: (1) great book or (2) POS depending on one's point of view.


#2 on NYT best sellers
quote:
Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
The Road to Burgundy

I'm in trouble.
How do you like it? I like Ray's story, but found this book hard to get through. I've tried a few times and I just get bored.

I have been enjoying The World of Sicilian Wine.
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
The Road to Burgundy

I'm in trouble.
How do you like it? I like Ray's story, but found this book hard to get through. I've tried a few times and I just get bored.

I have been enjoying The World of Sicilian Wine.


I think you're spot on. The story is keeping me engaged, but it isn't very well-written. I feel like he's trying to be an author and going for some prose in all the wrong places.
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by Jorgerunfast:
The Road to Burgundy

I'm in trouble.
How do you like it? I like Ray's story, but found this book hard to get through. I've tried a few times and I just get bored.

I have been enjoying The World of Sicilian Wine.


I just finished on the flight back from NY. It was a fun read, I skipped some of the parts where he went on about croissants and baguettes, but I enjoyed it overall.
quote:
Originally posted by Primordialsoup:
The Honourable Schoolboy- le Carre
A more tedious read than the other Smiley books.

I love this comment from a review of a reader on Amazon:
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Le Carre is the bravest popular novelist around. He panders to no one's politics; he doesn't care how much work a reader might normally choose to invest in a book; and he adheres to no formulae. You either trust him utterly, and let him take you where he's going, or you read Grisham.

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