quote:
Originally posted by DoktaP:
"The reason I jump" by Naoki Higashida. An insiders look at Autism through the eyes of a 13 year old.


I saw an interview on the Daily Show with the writer that translated the book and it intrigued me enough to seek this out. I have no connection with Autism, but it seemed like fascinating insight from somebody who could express it in a way so that people like myself might understand.

What did you think Dok?
It wasn't really a story as much as it was a question and answer. Very insightful and certainly a must read for families familiar with autistic spectrum disorder. It's an easy read in a single evening.
A Fine Balance- Rohinton Mistry
I would recommend this book to anyone looking for something deeper.

Currently halfway through Kafka on the Shore- Haruki Murakami, so far written in a style I haven't had much exposure to, but interesting.
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
A Fine Balance- Rohinton Mistry
I would recommend this book to anyone looking for something deeper.

Currently halfway through Kafka on the Shore- Haruki Murakami, so far written in a style I haven't had much exposure to, but interesting.


A Fine Balance is a very good book, but quite depressing
quote:
Originally posted by Javachip:
Can anyone recommend something by Alice Munro? What are two or three of her most Nobel-worthy works?

A Canadian author who graduated from my alma mater. I'll ask my wife for some reco's.
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
A Fine Balance- Rohinton Mistry
I would recommend this book to anyone looking for something deeper.

Currently halfway through Kafka on the Shore- Haruki Murakami, so far written in a style I haven't had much exposure to, but interesting.


A Fine Balance is a very good book, but quite depressing


Agreed. I loved how the author wrote the ending, but yes, very depressing.
I'm not reading it right now, but I love it, and I nearly dropped my backpack when I saw it on the shelf at Hudson Booksellers at IAD:

The Crisis of the European Mind by Paul Hazard
quote:
Originally posted by Javachip:
Can anyone recommend something by Alice Munro? What are two or three of her most Nobel-worthy works?

Javachip, the writer-in-residence at our house is currently enjoying Too Much Happiness, but also recommended getting a selected like Carried Away or Alice Munro's Best if you really want to get a feel for Munro's work.
How to Read a Building: a crash course in architecture by Cragoe. Fun; mostly geared to a historical perspective.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
How to Read a Building: a crash course in architecture by Cragoe. Fun; mostly geared to a historical perspective.

I like this book for American architecture:

A Field Guide To American Houses


Gents,

Do we want to start an architectural thread? This would really be in my wheelhouse. Big Grin
Finished Death of Kings and had to order the next book in the series from the UK, since it won't be released in the US until January.

In the meantime, am reading The Old Man and the Sea. I never actually read it before.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:In the meantime, am reading The Old Man and the Sea. I never actually read it before.

It's a lie! I've never been a fisherman.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Jabe11:
How to Read a Building: a crash course in architecture by Cragoe. Fun; mostly geared to a historical perspective.

I like this book for American architecture:

A Field Guide To American Houses


Gents,

Do we want to start an architectural thread? This would really be in my wheelhouse. Big Grin

No interest in such trivial matters. However getting your insider take on the reality show Big Rich Texas is another matter. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:In the meantime, am reading The Old Man and the Sea. I never actually read it before.

It's a lie! I've never been a fisherman.


Big Grin
Eminent Hipsters by Donald Fagen. A fun read.

My youngest took me to see Donald discuss the book in DC Tuesday. It's a good thing Donald is a great writer and a genius songwriter. He was a LOUSY interview.... Ack

PH
Welcome to Havana, Mr. Hemingway and Havana, an autobiography of a city, by Jose Estrada.

Both excellent reads for anyone interested in Ernest, cigars or La Habana.
The Monuments Men by Edsel. Ties in nicely with the recent headlines of Nazi loot found in Germany. Next up is Saving Italy; about the art treasures in Italy. I'm sure the Vatican didn't get hit. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
A Dance With Dragons - again

This is interesting. I'm slogging through it now. I would say, going by Amazon reviews, that this is even more hated than the fourth book A Feast for Crows (which I liked.) I think a lot of the distain comes from early readers of the series who tore through the great first three and then waited for 6+ years for the fourth and another 6+ years for the fifth.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:
A Dance With Dragons - again

This is interesting. I'm slogging through it now. I would say, going by Amazon reviews, that this is even more hated than the fourth book A Feast for Crows (which I liked.) I think a lot of the distain comes from early readers of the series who tore through the great first three and then waited for 6+ years for the fourth and another 6+ years for the fifth.


I think A Dance With Dragons is excellent -There is one of the plotlines, Dany's story in Mereen that people simply hate. It is also my least favorite but still good.

I have to say, while i lifes AFFC the first time I read it, I was somewhat disappointed. I re-read it, and found it excellent. There is so much packed in all these books, one read is not close to enough to get all the clues, hints and story lines that are buried in there.
I just think that Feast and Dance don't compare to the first three books. They don't seem to be advancing the ball very much.
quote:
Originally posted by Jcocktosten:

There is so much packed in all these books, one read is not close to enough to get all the clues, hints and story lines that are buried in there.



I agree. There hasn't been this kind of complex mythoepic created since Tolkien.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
Finished The Pagan Lord


Not as much action as he usually shows. Looking forward to the next installment though!

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