bman posted:
winetarelli posted:

Arlo

As one does on this day.  You watching the movie too?

Nope. Just listen to the song every Thanksgiving. Worthwhile tradition. Although last year on the SNL before Thanksgiving there was a sketch about how there are no Thanksgiving songs. I got so mad. 😜

winetarelli posted:

Rossini overtures, Offenbach overtures.

And again.  If you haven't listened in a while... man!  I literally started searching to see if any reputable company is putting on La Belle Helene this summer.  But, alas!

Also:

Stephen Stills

Neil Young

CSN&Y

CCR

The Kinks

The Byrds

Joan Baez

Badfinger

Steppenwolf

Prince

Sly & the Family Stone

The Beatles

Paul Simon

Lenny Kravitz

Aerosmith

Jackie Wilson

The Velvet Underground

Jimi Hendrix

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan & The Band

The Band

Stevie Wonder

... I had a musical day.

 

Oh!  Also, Traffic.

The Rolling Stones - Tattoo You

This album had pretty much been consigned to the dark corner of my collection a long time ago after having bought it upon release. I read something about it recently which made me pull it out for a spin. I certainly remembered the first side which is the one I listened to most way back when, but Side B has been a revelation. I recall it being inconvenient to listen to Waiting on a Friend but there are some excellent songs on it. I realize all of them were culled from sessions in the 70's but Jagger shines on these ballads.

Live Cream Volume II. I've always found this a problematic album. I can never decide if the audio is awful or amazing. Tom Dowd did an amazing job recording a power group with the technology of the day. It's obviously was a money grab album which didn't even come out until 4 years after the performance (and about 4 years after they broke up.)

However I listened to it a few nights ago and it reaffirmed the following:

No greater rock drummer than Ginger Baker (who died this year.)

No greater rock bass player than Jack Bruce.

And Clapton is Clapton.

Also the live version of Deserted Cities of the Heart is quite incredible. The drum and guitar duet that Clapton and Baker do on Steppin' Out reminds me of the the amazing live interplay of John Coltrane and Elvin Jones. FWIW the song is mislabeled, and misattributed, on the original pressing as Hideaway by King and Sonny Thompson. I have that LP and because I didn't listen to it much it's in perfect condition (the cover is not.) However my B&O turntable gave up the ghost over 20 years ago and I never replaced it.

billhike posted:
flwino posted:

Flogging Molly

That is not something I expected to see from you.  One of my favorite live bands to see.

My son-in-law  got me into them.  They went on the Flogging Molly cruise at beginning of November.  Now when we go to GA he has the group on Youtube.

billhike posted:
The Old Man posted:

No greater rock drummer than Ginger Baker (who died this year.)

A bit of a curmudgeon, like you. 
Safe assumption you’ve seen the documentary Beware of Mr. Baker?

Absolutely. It so interesting how early he got into African music. He was working in the "world music scene", before it had that name.

The Old Man posted:
winetarelli posted:

Ginger was the best.  No question.  (Only Watts can make an argument, but a very different style of play.)

I've always liked Charlie Watts.  However, FWIW, I think the second best double bass drum player was Mitch Mitchell.

I love him, too.  

The Old Man posted:

Live Cream Volume II. I've always found this a problematic album. I can never decide if the audio is awful or amazing. Tom Dowd did an amazing job recording a power group with the technology of the day. It's obviously was a money grab album which didn't even come out until 4 years after the performance (and about 4 years after they broke up.)

However I listened to it a few nights ago and it reaffirmed the following:

No greater rock drummer than Ginger Baker (who died this year.)

No greater rock bass player than Jack Bruce.

And Clapton is Clapton.

Also the live version of Deserted Cities of the Heart is quite incredible. The drum and guitar duet that Clapton and Baker do on Steppin' Out reminds me of the the amazing live interplay of John Coltrane and Elvin Jones. FWIW the song is mislabeled, and misattributed, on the original pressing as Hideaway by King and Sonny Thompson. I have that LP and because I didn't listen to it much it's in perfect condition (the cover is not.) However my B&O turntable gave up the ghost over 20 years ago and I never replaced it.

No greater rock drummer than Ginger Baker (who died this year.) Wrong old man...that would be Neil Peart

No greater rock bass player than Jack Bruce. Wrong again...that would be Geddy Lee

Both my personal opinion. But I am sure I have people that agree.

Happy New year to you, sincerely.  I will say one thing that I think you will agree with, the music of today simply sucks.  

I can agree with Neil over Ginger. Both innovative in different styles. I’m not sure who would top Neil technically. Saw him on Rush’s final tour and was amazed to learn later that he was dealing with tendinitis in both shoulders and a foot infection. Geddy  is great but I’d go with Jack over him for really pushing the boundary of the instrument at the time. 

I rained on two parades. 

thistlintom posted:

I would think you would have to consider Stewart Copeland, his rhythmic drumming was critical to the Police's music

A great one for sure. I’m a hard rock/metal guy, so players in that genre are usually the first to come to mind for me.

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