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quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Joe Cocker: Assorted songs, The Letter is playing as I type this.


Cool

Why am I not surprised you are a fan? Wink Big Grin


A great fan. Leon Russell was such a positive influence on his career .

Agreed.
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by NolanE:
The Velvet Underground & Nico - The Velvet Underground & Nico

Why am I just now listening to this.


As in, you're just discovering it now? Eek Vital listening.
I've known of its importance for a long time and I'm familiar with a few songs. But since I only buy and listen to vinyl, this took some time to come across.
quote:
Originally posted by NolanE:
quote:
Originally posted by steve8:
quote:
Originally posted by NolanE:
The Velvet Underground & Nico - The Velvet Underground & Nico

Why am I just now listening to this.


As in, you're just discovering it now? Eek Vital listening.
I've known of its importance for a long time and I'm familiar with a few songs. But since I only buy and listen to vinyl, this took some time to come across.


Tres, tres Cool !
quote:
Originally posted by khmark7:
quote:
Originally posted by gigabit:
The The - Dusk


Very nice...

I've been listening to the latest by Sum 41 and quite a bit of Everclear as well.


If the piano solo that ends The The - Uncertain Smile is not the greatest finishing piano solo ever, well, it's ONE of the greatest at least! Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Assorted Puccini


Good for you!

Why am I not surprised you approve? Razz


There was conversation about you in Chicago this weekend. Smile

Uh-oh... Wink

Edited to add: wait, what?! Grossie is the only Chicagoan on this board I've met personally, I think. This cannot be good. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:

Grossie is the only Chicagoan on this board I've met personally, I think. This cannot be good. Cool


The good doctor was kind enough to loan us a box of stems for our Italian wine dinner. (blocks from grossie's home)

KiKi's had proper stemware for our Bordeaux and Spanish wine dinner.

I will send you a message on FB, soon.
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
So question for my fellow forumites,

I love Karajan for beethoven as I feel he focuses on the best parts and speeds through some of the slower movements (gross simplification)

but mozart was always intricate and complex but I must admit my lack of knowledge with mozart composers.

Who do you guys recommend?


Leonard Bernstein for the 40th, the soundtrack to Elvira Madigan for piano concertos. I don't listen to much Mozart beyond the 40th and his concertos...

Also, get Carlos Kleiber's Beethoven's 5th and 7th. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
So question for my fellow forumites,

I love Karajan for beethoven as I feel he focuses on the best parts and speeds through some of the slower movements (gross simplification)

but mozart was always intricate and complex but I must admit my lack of knowledge with mozart composers.

Who do you guys recommend?


Leonard Bernstein for the 40th, the soundtrack to Elvira Madigan for piano concertos. I don't listen to much Mozart beyond the 40th and his concertos...

Also, get Carlos Kleiber's Beethoven's 5th and 7th. Smile


i like Carlos interpretation of the 7th.

his 5th though, the one performance I 've heard is too "fluid" and very shrilly (i've got a pair of klipsch rb-61 speakers). That finale is suppose to come at you and surprise you. He just goes loud all the way through that you're in essence not "shocked" that the finale is coming. It finishes and you're left wondering, oh it just ended.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by g-man:
So question for my fellow forumites,

I love Karajan for beethoven as I feel he focuses on the best parts and speeds through some of the slower movements (gross simplification)

but mozart was always intricate and complex but I must admit my lack of knowledge with mozart composers.

Who do you guys recommend?


Leonard Bernstein for the 40th, the soundtrack to Elvira Madigan for piano concertos. I don't listen to much Mozart beyond the 40th and his concertos...

Also, get Carlos Kleiber's Beethoven's 5th and 7th. Smile


the way to Mozart is through the operas. Don G is my favorite but perhaps Figaro is easier. Figaro is the first opera I saw and was immediately hooked. The first recording of Figaro I purchased was Marriner's on Phillips.
It's a good place to start also.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Alice in Chains - Unplugged.
What a great band! Layne Staley left this world way too soon.
Each time I have the opportunity to just shut everything out and fire up the system in the basement reminds me how much I miss doing this.
The Mrs. and I used to spend hours doing just this on the weekends.
Kids and life...
Two words that will solve all your problems......

"Military School". Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
A lot of Felix Mendelssohn on the iPod this morning during my exercise.


He wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream when he was 17. Slacker.

Seriously, as well regarded as he is, I think he is under-appreciated. Also, parents take note, if you want to get your kids into symphonic music, it has been my consistent experience, not just for myself, but for my friends growing up, that Mendelssohn is just about the most accessible of all the greats. (The Italian Symphony and The Hebrides Overture being particularly accessible.)
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
A lot of Felix Mendelssohn on the iPod this morning during my exercise.


He wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream when he was 17. Slacker.

Seriously, as well regarded as he is, I think he is under-appreciated. Also, parents take note, if you want to get your kids into symphonic music, it has been my consistent experience, not just for myself, but for my friends growing up, that Mendelssohn is just about the most accessible of all the greats. (The Italian Symphony and The Hebrides Overture being particularly accessible.)


You are such a learned person, to still be wet behind the ears. Razz Smile

I completely agree with your under-appreciated comment, and will raise the bet. There are far too many that do not even know of Mendelssohn. Frown
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
A lot of Felix Mendelssohn on the iPod this morning during my exercise.


He wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream when he was 17. Slacker.

Seriously, as well regarded as he is, I think he is under-appreciated. Also, parents take note, if you want to get your kids into symphonic music, it has been my consistent experience, not just for myself, but for my friends growing up, that Mendelssohn is just about the most accessible of all the greats. (The Italian Symphony and The Hebrides Overture being particularly accessible.)


You are such a learned person, to still be wet behind the ears. Razz Smile

I completely agree with your under-appreciated comment, and will raise the bet. There are far too many that do not even know of Mendelssohn. Frown


I like Mendelssohn, but really, his biggest contribution to music was the "rediscovery" of Bach.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
A lot of Felix Mendelssohn on the iPod this morning during my exercise.


He wrote A Midsummer Night's Dream when he was 17. Slacker.

Seriously, as well regarded as he is, I think he is under-appreciated. Also, parents take note, if you want to get your kids into symphonic music, it has been my consistent experience, not just for myself, but for my friends growing up, that Mendelssohn is just about the most accessible of all the greats. (The Italian Symphony and The Hebrides Overture being particularly accessible.)
If you’re a big Mendelssohn fan, you should check out the ‘83 recording of his violin concerto featuring Kyung Wha Chung with Charles Dutoit and the Montreal SO on Decca.
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
Alice in Chains - Unplugged.
What a great band! Layne Staley left this world way too soon.
Each time I have the opportunity to just shut everything out and fire up the system in the basement reminds me how much I miss doing this.
The Mrs. and I used to spend hours doing just this on the weekends.
Kids and life...

I can completely relate to your post, and the fact that you like Alice in Chains elevates you even higher on my list of forumites with whom I would like to share wine. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Joe Cocker, Janis, Elton John, Leonard Cohen, Dylan, Jefferson Airplane, Allman Brothers, Neil Young, CSN&Y, Buffalo Springfield, Traffic... been listening to music all day... I think that was the rough order.


Sounds like someone had a nickel bag delivered today...... Wink Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Joe Cocker, Janis, Elton John, Leonard Cohen, Dylan, Jefferson Airplane, Allman Brothers, Neil Young, CSN&Y, Buffalo Springfield, Traffic... been listening to music all day... I think that was the rough order.


BRAVO! (standing ovation) Cool

Perhaps the finest repertoire list here, ever.

Big Grin

As I was typing that I thought to myself you might like the list.

My father and I were speaking over the weekend about CSN&Y and Buffalo Springfield how, as good as many of the songs are, when all of the sudden Helpless or Country Girl comes on, or Mr. Soul... you realize you are now listening to something on a different level. So true.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Joe Cocker, Janis, Elton John, Leonard Cohen, Dylan, Jefferson Airplane, Allman Brothers, Neil Young, CSN&Y, Buffalo Springfield, Traffic... been listening to music all day... I think that was the rough order.


BRAVO! (standing ovation) Cool

Perhaps the finest repertoire list here, ever.

Big Grin

As I was typing that I thought to myself you might like the list.

My father and I were speaking over the weekend about CSN&Y and Buffalo Springfield how, as good as many of the songs are, when all of the sudden Helpless or Country Girl comes on, or Mr. Soul... you realize you are now listening to something on a different level. So true.


I would kiss you on both cheeks if you were near. Wink

Well played, winetarelli.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
Joni Mitchell, Blue.

I think I may have said this before but, I can think of fewer than five albums that I believe have, in aggregate, better songs on them; but as an album itself -- one unified piece of work -- I cannot think of any. And this is easily my most listened to album of all time, and overall, my favorite.