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quote:
Originally posted by gigabit:
Alice in Chains - Angry Chair


Cool

Sitting on an angry chair
Angry walls that steal the air
Stomach hurts and I dont care

What do I see across the way
See myself molded in clay
Stares at me, yeah Im afraid
Changing the shape of his face

Candles red I have a pair
Shadows dancing everywhere
Burning on the angry chair

Little boy made a mistake
Pink cloud has now turned to gray
All that I want is to play
Get on your knees, time to pray, boy
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:
The HDH Auction, live stream, in Chicago
You get anything?

No no. I'm in 'tourist' mode (thus far).

Enjoyable to watch however. Some beautiful wines going off. Most going for lower estimates thusfar, but for the rediculous Screaming Eagles. Went off above high estimates. Eek

Nice way to get a 'snapshot' of the market at this time.
W+a - quick question for you and others. when did you start actually enjoying classical music? I listened to some in college because it was the thing to do, and can enjoy some pieces and performances, but would never, at least now, in my mid-30s, buy or listen to just classical music. I dont' mean this as anything other than curiousity and wondering if it is personal style thing or if you just grew into it as you get older.

thanks
Dale451, no umbrage taking whatsoever.

You stated " listened in college because it was the thing to do, begs the question... where did you go to college? Wink

As to your question, my taste in life is hyper eclectic, including music. I have a passion for the finer things in many specific genres in my life, and music being one. I have an Aunt only 7 years older than I. She was a classically trained ballerina. I was always dragged to see her as a young boy, and was exposed to many things classic early in my life. Perhaps that is where it started, never thought of it really.

Music like many genres have much ebb and flow, and many times we will endure centuries between true genius. Put much of what is being created today through the filter of time. What music today will be selling and studied 300 years from now in major Universities around the world?

Have you ever read, Human Accomplishment, The Pursuit of Excellence?

Now, do not get me going on the subject of ART! Wink
w+a - I went to Yale University and for several years spent a lot of time listening to various forms of classical music. I consider myself to have a very ecletic taste in music as well, but for some reason, just can't get myself to really enjoy most classical music, and definately not as something to just pop in and listen to for 1/2 hour. I consider myself rather well educated, both socially, historically and with the arts, but this is one piece that just leaves me scratching my head.

And while I have not read this [human accomplishment], one of my earliest, and most treasured gifts from my father was a full set of the "The Story of
Civilization" by will and ariel durant. Over the years, I would guess that I have read almost 80-90%, which, if you know the set, is pretty daunting. I love history and the way that the world repeats itself and yet evolves as the same time, but again, this one genre just doesn't float my boat (yet?).
Last edited by dale451
Dale you are not alone. I also have a pretty eclectic music library, but I just can’t get into classical. My father in-law is all classical all the time and after a couple of hours I have serious thoughts of taking a louisville slugger to his stereo. But, just like wine, the best thing about music is there are styles for everyone.
W+A - My tastes in art run the gamut as well, but I am much more a "feel" kind of guy if we are talking about paintings. I really enjoy Paul Klee, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaugin and Cezanne, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky and Ludwig Kirchner.

It really depends on the mood, I guess (as does anything that is supposed to evoke a feeling inside of you). I am really into photography and so do spend a lot of time with this medium and enjoy Tadasuke Akiyama, Timothy Allen and others. What people can "create" with a camera while looking at the same scene as you is amazing to me. I have two young boys, who are the subject matter of much of what I do, but I have thousands of cherished memories printed and locked up on disc that I will always have of them growing up.

And yourself, where does your art interest lie?
last night, Gypsy Kings, while drinking a Hacienda Monasterio (and yes, I know that the Gypsy Kings are French, but speak Spanish), but the feel is much more spanish to me then French, thus my choice of wine, or my choice of music based upon the selection of wine? either way, it was a nice, mellow Sunday night after 5 flag football games over the weekend.

Dale
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
last night, Gypsy Kings, while drinking a Hacienda Monasterio (and yes, I know that the Gypsy Kings are French, but speak Spanish), but the feel is much more spanish to me then French, thus my choice of wine, or my choice of music based upon the selection of wine? either way, it was a nice, mellow Sunday night after 5 flag football games over the weekend.

Dale


Dale, I saw them on their last show in the U.S. this year before they headed back to France.

They performed in our small symphony hall and put on one heck of a show, and yes, I would also drink Spanish. Cool
w+a - that is great. I have seen them three times, all in small venues and really enjoy their music and the energy at shows. They put on a great live performance.

The issue, to me, is what to drink when listening to Enigma (monks/trance music). I was leaning towards Chartreuse or Champagne, but am thinking that I may have to break down and buy a newly legal bottle of Absinthe and see how that works.

Dale
Dale,
I’ve been enjoying classical music since early high school and I just couldn’t imagine my life without it. And I also enjoy a wide variety of music. There are just simply too many moments in life when only a certain type or piece of music will justify. There are times when the wail of Plant singing "Aaaahh, ah" from the "Immigrant Song" or the simple pounding thunder of Angus in “Girl's Got Rhythm” that nothing else can evoke such a visceral response either listening alone or with others. But the same truth holds for moments of reflection such as the pastoral beauty found in LB’s 6th or enjoying a fine dinner with friends with a Mozart piano concerto.

Denying oneself a style of music because of its genre is like denying yourself a great wine because of the varietal - I just don’t understand that approach. Over the weekend, I listened to Loretta Lynn, My Morning Jacket, Usher, Black Sabbath, Coltrane, Free, Prince, Duffy, Beethoven and Brahms, just to name a few.
I started listening to classical music when I was around 18. It now comprises about 1/3 of my music library which is about 2K + CD's. I tend towards chamber music and more obscure composers, but still focus on music composed from 1600 to 1830. If I had to choose what to listen to for the rest of my life, I would choose classical without hesitation. It's more complex than Rock & Roll, Blues etc...(some jazz has it's moments) but you can listen to classical in the forefront or background and hear different structural elements. It's not boring, once you listen to it. How many times can you listen to some iconic Rock music? It runs its course pretty quickly and you grow audibly tired of it. I don't experience that with classical.
I am not saying that I don't listen to classical music on principal and that is that. I was just stating that I have listened to a lot, and actually took a musical comp/theory class in college that focused on classical and jazz, and it just doesn't get me excited as it seems to others. I have no problem with it being background music or soothing music if that is the right time/place for it, but as something that will be the focal point of a specific period of time for me (ie, I choose to sit down for this period of time and listen to X), classical just isn't that choice, for me.

Again, my original question is not to bash or question the validity of classical music to others. It was, if you look back at the question, more of when you started to like it as I was wondering if that 'development' would come with age, similarly to my transition from Aussie fruit bombs through the gamut to my current tastes for mostly burgundy.

Again, not trying to label anyone or denigrate anyone's choice for styles of music, just trying to understand what gets people excited about classical music and when you started down that road.

thanks, Dale
The Who - Who's Better, Who's Best....

Has this ever taken a real interesting turn! I would say that I am in the Dale and Glenn camp - with very eclectic tastes as well. On rare occasions I can listen to classical, but I certainly don't make it a point. My tastes run to classic rock and metal, but I also have a vast collection of country CD's (the old Datsun 510 station wagon that I got to drive in high school only had an AM radio, and I just couldn't listen to KFRC any more, so my country phase started), and I can certainly do the alternative stuff that I listened to in college. Really, the only stuff I cannot stand is the hardcore rap - the stuff that a good majority of my students listen to.... Roll Eyes
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:


Again, my original question is not to bash or question the validity of classical music to others. It was, if you look back at the question, more of when you started to like it as I was wondering if that 'development' would come with age, similarly to my transition from Aussie fruit bombs through the gamut to my current tastes for mostly burgundy.


I don't think age has anything to do with it. As stated above, I started listening to it when I was 18. I also took a music appreciation class in college. And I currently (sometimes) read biographies of composers to understand the music in context to it's time. The only thing that has changed with me is the breadth and depth of my appreciation.

I take no offense in that people may not want to listen to 200+ year old music Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
w+a - that is great. I have seen them three times, all in small venues and really enjoy their music and the energy at shows. They put on a great live performance.

The issue, to me, is what to drink when listening to Enigma (monks/trance music). I was leaning towards Chartreuse or Champagne, but am thinking that I may have to break down and buy a newly legal bottle of Absinthe and see how that works.

Dale


Dale, the answer to any and all questions is... CHAMPAGNE. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
W+a - quick question for you and others. when did you start actually enjoying classical music? I listened to some in college because it was the thing to do, and can enjoy some pieces and performances, but would never, at least now, in my mid-30s, buy or listen to just classical music. I dont' mean this as anything other than curiousity and wondering if it is personal style thing or if you just grew into it as you get older.

thanks


Dale,

I started listening at around 16, and really got into "classical" (mostly not Classical, but Romantic) music at around 18. I'm now in my late twenties and I would say it makes up about 1/4 of the music I listen to.
quote:
...My tastes in art run the gamut as well, but I am much more a "feel" kind of guy if we are talking about paintings. I really enjoy Paul Klee, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaugin and Cezanne, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky and Ludwig Kirchner.


Man... I'm with you on the Chagall and Kandinsky. One of my later-in-life goals is to be able to afford a nice Chagall lithograph. I've had Kandinsky posters on my walls on and off since I was 17.

Out of curiosity, did you answer that question based upon ambience or overall appreciation? The reason I ask is that Chagall, Miro, and Kandinsky are probably my three favorites for ambience. HOWEVER, in terms of enjoyment in certain settings, El Greco, Goya, Rembrandt, to me, are tough to beat. (As are many many others... Bosch, Picasso, Monet...)
Winetarelli- when I first graduated, I used to do the "oh I went back East", which was then " a little school in New Haven", to "oh, yes, in Connecticut", which then ended up with "Yale".

Now, at this point, we are all who we are and do what we do and so I have cut through this and just answer.

And, as to the art, yes, that answer is for ambience, and yes, yes, I too would love a Chagall lithograph. And if you ever decide to be generous, my favorite Chagall is 'Circus'.

And just for fun, we have several Charles Bragg pictures up in my office at home and our bedroom. I am curious what people think of him as a serious/satiric artist.

Dale
Last edited by dale451
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
W+A - My tastes in art run the gamut as well, but I am much more a "feel" kind of guy if we are talking about paintings. I really enjoy Paul Klee, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaugin and Cezanne, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky and Ludwig Kirchner.

Cool I know them all, and very well.



And yourself, where does your art interest lie?


Dale, sorry, I just saw this post. Red Face

I will post soon, it will take a while for my list. Wink ( one hint, I like irwin own a Chagall litho.)
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
w+a - really?!?! you have a Chagall. very cool. between this and the wonderful wine that you drink, I am close to asking you to adopt me. I am in my 30's, that wouldn't be too weird, right!??!?! Smile



Hey, Irwin has a Chagall as well.

Perhaps joint custody is in order here. Wink


okay, now I know 2 more places to visit for offlines. Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:


W+A - My tastes in art run the gamut as well, but I am much more a "feel" kind of guy if we are talking about paintings. I really enjoy Paul Klee, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaugin and Cezanne, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky and Ludwig Kirchner.



And yourself, where does your art interest lie?



Oh my, where to start? Smile

My favorite genre is Modern (1906 - 1956) and work inspired from the Movement. I'm also smitten with the SoHo Abstract Expressionism.

A few of my favorites.

Picasso (only true genius since the High Renaissance.)
Modigliani
Bacon
Dali
Delvaux
Rothko
Chagall
Braque
Weight
Rego
Motherwell
Miro
Kandinsky
Matisse
De Chirico
Cezanne
Hodgkin
Giacometti
Magritte
Lawrence
Dix
Kline
Miro
Kirchner
Manet
Pollock
Kiefer
Freud
Close

I shudder to think of all the ones I left off my quick list. Wink

Now please understand, this does not include my love of sculpture, photography and the Renaissance Movement. Red Face
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
W+A - My tastes in art run the gamut as well, but I am much more a "feel" kind of guy if we are talking about paintings. I really enjoy Paul Klee, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaugin and Cezanne, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky and Ludwig Kirchner.



Dale, speaking of the great Kirchner... do you have the book, Kirchner and the Berlin Street?
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
W+A - My tastes in art run the gamut as well, but I am much more a "feel" kind of guy if we are talking about paintings. I really enjoy Paul Klee, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Gaugin and Cezanne, Marc Chagall, Wassily Kandinsky and Ludwig Kirchner.



Dale, speaking of the great Kirchner... do you have the book, Kirchner and the Berlin Street?


I do, actually, and Two Women on the Street is one of my favorites.

Dale
quote:
Originally posted by GreenDrazi:
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
Live at Leeds
Which version?

One of the best live albums ever - and I don’t like live albums that much. I love the remastered version (14 tracks), but still like to trim I down to the original 6 tracks. The deluxe version is too long and too remixed for my taste.


I agree on it being just about the best live album ever. I think almost all the songs on it are better than their studio versions. The 14 track one.
W+a - Glad you enjoyed it.

And Jason M. agreed. great band/music that with the right surroundings/times, can be a great experience. I actually discovered ths song about 10 years ago when two female friends of mine danced their way through law school. This was the signature song of one.


Duckfan - yes, agreed, I have been a huge fan of Sugar and Bob Mould for a long time, and CopperBlue ranks up, as far a top to bottom great album, with almost any other.

Others that I am listening to now:

Rolling Stones - Some Girls -

Prince - great hits (of some kind or another) -

Dierks Bentley - I will come out here and admit that I am starting to like country music.

Dale
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by gigabit:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
The Marriage of Figaro.

I was just listening to this the other day, at work no less. One of the truly great overtures. Cool


Is it heresy to say I actually prefer the overture to The Barbar of Seville? I know you're not supposed to like Rossini more than Mozart, but...

BLASPHEMER!
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
T.I. - Whatever you like

can't get this out of my head, and the Patron does sound good right about now!!


I am convinced the only reason people listen to this song is because the radio will not play anything else. The song is terrible, yet people get convinced it is good because they shove it down our throats.

I can't get it out of my head either.
Sticky - agreed, it is definitely up there for most overplayed song of the year so far. But, again, I can't get it out of my head. Thanks for that.

last night, pre-ordered the new Guns N Roses Album and listened to a little Chinese Democracy.

Also, Seal's new album and some John Coltrane, with a bit of Theory of a Deadman thrown in.
quote:
Originally posted by Icewino:
My wife has a 24 hour Christmas station on out in the kitchen. I may go blow my brains out soon.


I like Christmas music, especially the Christmas Cocktails series (Jimmy McGriff's version of "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" is smokin') and the classical CD The Christmas Concert (absolutely beautiful). There is one rule I abide by, however: No Christmas music until after Thanksgiving. The day after Christmas, all Christmas music ceases.
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:

Duckfan - yes, agreed, I have been a huge fan of Sugar and Bob Mould for a long time, and CopperBlue ranks up, as far a top to bottom great album, with almost any other.

Dale


Copper Blue is indeed one of the best top-to-bottom albums around... I never get tired of listening to it. That said, I still consider Beaster to be Bob Mould's/Sugar's best work. As I'm guessing you'd agree, it's definitely not for everyone and it's not the kind of album that you'd listen to all the time (I think you have to be in a certain kind of mood). Still, that album is about as powerful and raw as they come, with layers and layers and layers of sound - all of which works - reeling you in.

I clearly remember this being one of the CD's that I played often during the late night/early morning hours while racing in RAAM or the Furnace Creek 508 ultra cycling races. I figured that if this didn't get me jacked up nothing would. "JC Auto" never ceases to blow me away; it's one of the most angry, yet passionate, songs I've ever heard.
Glenn - I really think that it depends how much of a GNR fan you are. Appetite came out when I was a freshman in high school and we listened to this and Lies during high school, and then Use your Illusion 1 and2 came out early in college for me, and I have been a big fan for a long time now.

Now, with that said,it is not Apptetite. It is a little more mainstream rock, but the guitars and drums are pretty good, and it is always good to hear Axl's voice. It is a little rougher than anything on Use Your Illusion, but still very story driven. I like it so far, but haven't found my Mr. Brownstone, Paradise City, Used to Love Her, so I had to Kill Her, or anything like that yet.

I think that if you are a fan at all, you should get it. It was only $10 on Itunes, so youcan't beat that.

Dale

quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
new Guns N Roses Album, Chinese Democracy
How do you like it? I’ve heard very mixed reviews.
quote:
Originally posted by duckfaninmt:
Not everyone will like this, and it's OK if you don't (we all, of course, have different tastes), but this is about the coolest piece of music that I've heard (or seen) in a long, long time... just amazing stuff.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avwXET5ippQ&feature=related


Nice tune. Pat Metheny used to regularly play at Northern Illinois University. One year while I was attending NIU, Pat was playing at the Eygptian Theatre in town. I was not at the show but apparently Pat made a bit of a mistake by saying something like, "We like to come to NIU to work the kinks out before we start our real tour."

Lots of Booing and people leaving the show. I'm not sure if he's ever been back.

Kind of funny Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
Drinking Highland Park 12 and listening to Whitesnake – Here I go again. A potentially dangerous combination!
HP 12 is probably my favorite "every day" scotch, super smooth but with way more personality than say a Dalwhinnie.

Listening to one of my staff complain about her performance review. Blah.
Ultra-Lounge: Christmas Cocktails, Pt. 2

The liner notes alone are worth the price of the CD... classic stuff! And the music is pretty damn cool as well. Jimmy McGriff's version of "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" (as the liner notes say), smolders like a Dura-Flame log. Wonderful! Peggy Lee's "Happy Holiday" is exceptional, especially for the musicianship of the orchestra backing her. And what could be cooler than Dean Martin's rendition of "Baby It's Cold Outside"? Cool

I only play Christmas music from after Thanksgiving until Christmas, so it gets limited airtime. But when it's time to put it on, the three "Christmas Cocktails" CD's are at the top of the play list.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:


He was interviewed by Elvis Costello for Spectacle on the Sundance Channel last week. Interesting.



Thanks for the heads-up, I will seek it out. I just love how Costello crosses over into so many genres. I look forward to watching it.

I'm not sure what happened to Elton. In my opinion, his early career was brilliant, then he lost his way I thought.

The influence of Leon Russell and Laura Nyro helped create greatness ( my opinion) early on.

You have put me in the mood for a little Burn Down the Mission. Cool
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
The Chairman of the Board - Luck Be A Lady - one of my favorite songs of all time.


I love Sinatra!

Remind me to tell you my Sinatra and Champagne story when we offline together.

The man that was my wine mentor lived next door to Frank. Wink

w+a-

Mrs. Gigabit worships Sinatra. Our wedding song: I've Got You Under My Skin. Smile
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by gigabit:


Mrs. Gigabit worships Sinatra. Our wedding song: I've Got You Under My Skin. Smile



Your wife has impeccable style and taste... but you already knew that.

She is a classiclly-trained singer, so she recognizes a great voice when she hears one. How do you think she fell for me? Big Grin
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by Dale451:
The Chairman of the Board - Luck Be A Lady - one of my favorite songs of all time.


I love Sinatra!

Remind me to tell you my Sinatra and Champagne story when we offline together.

The man that was my wine mentor lived next door to Frank. Wink


W+A - will do, and I will counter with my only Sinatra story. I happpened to be in Vegas the night that Sinatra died and it was one of the most moving things that I have experienced with a mass of people.



Dale
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by gigabit:


How do you think she fell for me? Big Grin



Perhaps I should answer that question at an offline. Red Face Wink

Sinatra said he only met one true genius (musical) in his career. Any guess?

Hmm...my guess would be Cole Porter.

My father-in-law's cousin, Nicki Almondola, was a childhood friend of Frank Sinatra in Hoboken.
quote:
Originally posted by Icewino:
The local radio station tell us even though we've been without power since thursday it might be a week before we get it again after this ice storm Frown Is this supposed to happen in 2008? Hmm, what to pull from the wine cellar next?

On the bright side, at least you don't have to worry about your wine being cooked.


Norah Jones Cool
quote:
The Shins


I like "Sleeping Lessons" from the Shins. Good tune.

Right now, Arcade Fire (can't get enough of Neon Bible) and Fleet Foxes.