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winetarelli posted:

Rossini overtures, Offenbach overtures.

And again.  If you haven't listened in a while... man!  I literally started searching to see if any reputable company is putting on La Belle Helene this summer.  But, alas!

Also:

Stephen Stills

Neil Young

CSN&Y

CCR

The Kinks

The Byrds

Joan Baez

Badfinger

Steppenwolf

Prince

Sly & the Family Stone

The Beatles

Paul Simon

Lenny Kravitz

Aerosmith

Jackie Wilson

The Velvet Underground

Jimi Hendrix

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan & The Band

The Band

Stevie Wonder

... I had a musical day.

 

Oh!  Also, Traffic.

Last edited by winetarelli

The Rolling Stones - Tattoo You

This album had pretty much been consigned to the dark corner of my collection a long time ago after having bought it upon release. I read something about it recently which made me pull it out for a spin. I certainly remembered the first side which is the one I listened to most way back when, but Side B has been a revelation. I recall it being inconvenient to listen to Waiting on a Friend but there are some excellent songs on it. I realize all of them were culled from sessions in the 70's but Jagger shines on these ballads.

Live Cream Volume II. I've always found this a problematic album. I can never decide if the audio is awful or amazing. Tom Dowd did an amazing job recording a power group with the technology of the day. It's obviously was a money grab album which didn't even come out until 4 years after the performance (and about 4 years after they broke up.)

However I listened to it a few nights ago and it reaffirmed the following:

No greater rock drummer than Ginger Baker (who died this year.)

No greater rock bass player than Jack Bruce.

And Clapton is Clapton.

Also the live version of Deserted Cities of the Heart is quite incredible. The drum and guitar duet that Clapton and Baker do on Steppin' Out reminds me of the the amazing live interplay of John Coltrane and Elvin Jones. FWIW the song is mislabeled, and misattributed, on the original pressing as Hideaway by King and Sonny Thompson. I have that LP and because I didn't listen to it much it's in perfect condition (the cover is not.) However my B&O turntable gave up the ghost over 20 years ago and I never replaced it.

Last edited by The Old Man
The Old Man posted:

Live Cream Volume II. I've always found this a problematic album. I can never decide if the audio is awful or amazing. Tom Dowd did an amazing job recording a power group with the technology of the day. It's obviously was a money grab album which didn't even come out until 4 years after the performance (and about 4 years after they broke up.)

However I listened to it a few nights ago and it reaffirmed the following:

No greater rock drummer than Ginger Baker (who died this year.)

No greater rock bass player than Jack Bruce.

And Clapton is Clapton.

Also the live version of Deserted Cities of the Heart is quite incredible. The drum and guitar duet that Clapton and Baker do on Steppin' Out reminds me of the the amazing live interplay of John Coltrane and Elvin Jones. FWIW the song is mislabeled, and misattributed, on the original pressing as Hideaway by King and Sonny Thompson. I have that LP and because I didn't listen to it much it's in perfect condition (the cover is not.) However my B&O turntable gave up the ghost over 20 years ago and I never replaced it.

No greater rock drummer than Ginger Baker (who died this year.) Wrong old man...that would be Neil Peart

No greater rock bass player than Jack Bruce. Wrong again...that would be Geddy Lee

Both my personal opinion. But I am sure I have people that agree.

Happy New year to you, sincerely.  I will say one thing that I think you will agree with, the music of today simply sucks.  

I can agree with Neil over Ginger. Both innovative in different styles. I’m not sure who would top Neil technically. Saw him on Rush’s final tour and was amazed to learn later that he was dealing with tendinitis in both shoulders and a foot infection. Geddy  is great but I’d go with Jack over him for really pushing the boundary of the instrument at the time. 

I rained on two parades. 

Radios became popular in the 1920's, almost a century ago.  From Cole Porter to Woody Guthrie, from Metallica to Kendrick Lamar, there have been many styles, fads, and phases of music since.  But something different happened from the mid 60's through very early 70's.  Songs like "Gimme Shelter, "Visions of Johanna", or "Bridge Over Troubled Water" -- or albums like Abbey Road, or Tommy, or Highway 61 Revisited -- probably could not have come out at any other time.  And, certainly could not have come out all on top of each other at any other time with scores of other works also deserving of mention.

winetarelli posted:
steve8 posted:

Joni Mitchell - Clouds

Some of the lesser-known songs off of that album, eg. "Roses Blue", are some of the most haunting I know of.

Agreed.  I need a double Scotch when I listen!

I'm now listening to Johnny Cash, specifically the Folsom Prison and San Quentin concerts.  Powerful stuff.

wineart 2 posted:
winetarelli posted:

I was just listening to his version of "Hurt" earlier today.   Right now listening to Springsteen with Tom Morello at Rock Hall 25th anniversary concert "Ghost of Tom Joad".

Hmm, I think I will go back to Joni? 😎

Joni's extraordinary.  Clouds?  Blue?  Something else?

Right now "Stand" by Sly and the Family Stone is playing.  Next up, CCR.

haggis posted:
winetarelli posted:

Beethoven’s 7th. The recording I’ve mentioned elsewhere Carlos Kleiber / Vienna Philharmonic. 

One of the greatest recordings of all time.  I went through a few vinyl copies back in the day.  CD not quite as good sound, but this is on the top of my all-time favorite list.

I never had the chance to hear it on vinyl.  But, we're in complete agreement.  My favorite recording of my favorite piece of music.

 

Right now, however:

The Band, The Band

winetarelli posted:
haggis posted:
winetarelli posted:

Beethoven’s 7th. The recording I’ve mentioned elsewhere Carlos Kleiber / Vienna Philharmonic. 

One of the greatest recordings of all time.  I went through a few vinyl copies back in the day.  CD not quite as good sound, but this is on the top of my all-time favorite list.

I never had the chance to hear it on vinyl.  But, we're in complete agreement.  My favorite recording of my favorite piece of music.

 

Right now, however:

The Band, The Band

And for me, right now, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

winetarelli posted:
haggis posted:
winetarelli posted:

Beethoven’s 7th. The recording I’ve mentioned elsewhere Carlos Kleiber / Vienna Philharmonic. 

One of the greatest recordings of all time.  I went through a few vinyl copies back in the day.  CD not quite as good sound, but this is on the top of my all-time favorite list.

I never had the chance to hear it on vinyl.  But, we're in complete agreement.  My favorite recording of my favorite piece of music.

 

Right now, however:

The Band, The Band

I went on a Band kick recently after reading both Robbie Robertson's and Levon Helm's autobiographies in succession. I listened again to their full catalog in chronological order. 

Even though they weren't particularly well received at the time, I still love Stage Fright and Cahoots. And especially Northern Lights, Southern Cross which had classics like Ophelia, Acadian Driftwood and It Makes No Difference -- all prominently featured in The Last Waltz.

sunnylea57 posted:
winetarelli posted:
haggis posted:
winetarelli posted:

Beethoven’s 7th. The recording I’ve mentioned elsewhere Carlos Kleiber / Vienna Philharmonic. 

One of the greatest recordings of all time.  I went through a few vinyl copies back in the day.  CD not quite as good sound, but this is on the top of my all-time favorite list.

I never had the chance to hear it on vinyl.  But, we're in complete agreement.  My favorite recording of my favorite piece of music.

 

Right now, however:

The Band, The Band

I went on a Band kick recently after reading both Robbie Robertson's and Levon Helm's autobiographies in succession. I listened again to their full catalog in chronological order. 

Even though they weren't particularly well received at the time, I still love Stage Fright and Cahoots. And especially Northern Lights, Southern Cross which had classics like Ophelia, Acadian Driftwood and It Makes No Difference -- all prominently featured in The Last Waltz.

Last Waltz was the first film I watched twice in a theatre. Or pretty much otherwise. Never really wanted to watch many films more than once. 

sunnylea57 posted:
winetarelli posted:
haggis posted:
winetarelli posted:

Beethoven’s 7th. The recording I’ve mentioned elsewhere Carlos Kleiber / Vienna Philharmonic. 

One of the greatest recordings of all time.  I went through a few vinyl copies back in the day.  CD not quite as good sound, but this is on the top of my all-time favorite list.

I never had the chance to hear it on vinyl.  But, we're in complete agreement.  My favorite recording of my favorite piece of music.

 

Right now, however:

The Band, The Band

I went on a Band kick recently after reading both Robbie Robertson's and Levon Helm's autobiographies in succession. I listened again to their full catalog in chronological order. 

Even though they weren't particularly well received at the time, I still love Stage Fright and Cahoots. And especially Northern Lights, Southern Cross which had classics like Ophelia, Acadian Driftwood and It Makes No Difference -- all prominently featured in The Last Waltz.

Northern Lights...is a great overlooked album. If you look for it you'll notice that its format (who sings what song, at what place and the type of song) closely resembles The Band. The contract fulfilling Moondog Matinee is an album I wish didn't exist. (Though here's an interesting fact: The Salvation Army type song Saved, which I think almost no one ever heard before, showed up on Raquel Welsh's first TV special.) And the less said about Islands the better. I'm also not a big fan of the live album with horn section. For their only live album (not including The Last Waltz which is not really a regular live album) I would have preferred just the group. I did once own their bootleg on the Rubber Ducky label but it was pretty much unlistenable.

steve8 posted:

Captain Beefheart - Doc at the Radar Station

steve8... just a quick compliment on your eclectic tastes.  I often either find something new to listen to, or am reminded of something in the back of my racks that I need to pull when  I read your posts here.

Beefheart is under appreciated, imo.   I borrowed a variation of the title of Her Eyes Are A Blue Million Miles to use as a line on a date many years ago to great success.  

I saw him and the Magic Band at the Bayou in DC the very early 80s.  Still etched in my brain.  

PH

Listening to the podcast Chasing Cosby. I hope I'm not the only one who heard the irony when their sponsor,  SimpliSafe , said you can get a discount by going to, SimpliSafe/Cosby.

It's amazing the sickness that was going on with this man for almost my entire adult  life. I didn't pay much attention to him for the last few decades but always liked him.  "I Spy" is still very watchable.

Last edited by The Old Man

After watching a bunch of snippets of him on Colbert, I've been listening to a good bit of random James Taylor.  I'd forgotten how much his music was a part of my youth.  

If you like JT, do watch the interviews.  A quirky genius, this James Taylor fellow, and a great storyteller.  His confirmation on the origin of You Can Close Your Eyes. is worth the price of admission.

 A truly wonderful fingerstyle guitar player and a damn good songwriter.  Haven't heard a cut from his new album yet, but will definitely do so.

PH

purplehaze posted:

After watching a bunch of snippets of him on Colbert, I've been listening to a good bit of random James Taylor.  I'd forgotten how much his music was a part of my youth.  

If you like JT, do watch the interviews.  A quirky genius, this James Taylor fellow, and a great storyteller.  His confirmation on the origin of You Can Close Your Eyes. is worth the price of admission.

 A truly wonderful fingerstyle guitar player and a damn good songwriter.  Haven't heard a cut from his new album yet, but will definitely do so.

PH

His tour starts in a few weeks. We may see him in Edmonton. 

bman posted:
purplehaze posted:

After watching a bunch of snippets of him on Colbert, I've been listening to a good bit of random James Taylor.  I'd forgotten how much his music was a part of my youth.  

If you like JT, do watch the interviews.  A quirky genius, this James Taylor fellow, and a great storyteller.  His confirmation on the origin of You Can Close Your Eyes. is worth the price of admission.

 A truly wonderful fingerstyle guitar player and a damn good songwriter.  Haven't heard a cut from his new album yet, but will definitely do so.

PH

His tour starts in a few weeks. We may see him in Edmonton. 

I saw a live performance on TV in the past month - can't recall where - and he seemed to be struggling with his vocal range. You could see him straining for the higher notes. Hopefully he just had a cold, because he's got such a great voice.

If he has his long-time band on this tour, it's well worth the price of admission. Phenomenal players including Steve Gadd on drums, Jimmy Johnson on bass, Lou Marini on sax, etc. If those names don't mean anything to you, google them.

sunnylea57 posted:
bman posted:
purplehaze posted:

After watching a bunch of snippets of him on Colbert, I've been listening to a good bit of random James Taylor.  I'd forgotten how much his music was a part of my youth.  

If you like JT, do watch the interviews.  A quirky genius, this James Taylor fellow, and a great storyteller.  His confirmation on the origin of You Can Close Your Eyes. is worth the price of admission.

 A truly wonderful fingerstyle guitar player and a damn good songwriter.  Haven't heard a cut from his new album yet, but will definitely do so.

PH

His tour starts in a few weeks. We may see him in Edmonton. 

I saw a live performance on TV in the past month - can't recall where - and he seemed to be struggling with his vocal range. You could see him straining for the higher notes. Hopefully he just had a cold, because he's got such a great voice.

If he has his long-time band on this tour, it's well worth the price of admission. Phenomenal players including Steve Gadd on drums, Jimmy Johnson on bass, Lou Marini on sax, etc. If those names don't mean anything to you, google them.

Thanks for the tip Sunny, I'll do that.

From the LA Times:

"Led Zeppelin did not steal ‘Stairway to Heaven’ riff, court rules

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal appeals court decided Monday that the British rock band Led Zeppelin did not steal of portions of “Stairway to Heaven” from another band.
The ruling, by an 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, stemmed from a lawsuit that accused Led Zeppelin of stealing portions of “Stairway to Heaven” from a song called “Taurus,” which was written by Randy Wolfe of the Los Angeles-based band Spirit.

A jury ruled for Zeppelin, deciding the two songs were not substantially similar. A three-judge 9th Circuit panel later threw out the verdict on the grounds the trial judge gave faulty jury instructions.
Led Zeppelin asked a larger panel to reconsider, and Monday’s decision reinstated the verdict."

That said, Led Zeppelin sucked then and they suck now.

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