Vintages January 19 2013

I really enjoy the wines of Spain (mostly red) and often find them to have an excellent quality to price ratio. Not familiar with too many of them in this release, but wondered if anyone had tried any of these, or if there were ones that are consistently good.

I thought the sarada might be interesting and maybe the bordon rioja. I'd welcome any suggestion as I value the opinions of the people on this board more than most of the reviews in the vintages magazine.
quote:
Originally posted by Fowler52:
A $40 Spatburgunder? Crazy

I don't see any Germany pinot noir in the release?
If I buy anything it will likely be one of the Spanish ones that I can pick up 6 or 12 to drink a bottle on a weeknight without breaking the bank.
quote:
Originally posted by swinter:
quote:
Originally posted by Fowler52:
A $40 Spatburgunder? Crazy

I don't see any Germany pinot noir in the release?
If I buy anything it will likely be one of the Spanish ones that I can pick up 6 or 12 to drink a bottle on a weeknight without breaking the bank.
e
U

Look at the bottom. Its an ISD product. So it wont be in every store.
quote:
Originally posted by Fowler52:
A $40 Spatburgunder? Crazy


Yeah, I kind of wondered about that, but you never know. I found this description on a German wine site for those who are interested:

Description
Spicy aroma with peppers, strawberries, raspberries and shades from the barrel. Juicy, spicy flavor with a cool tone, fresh berries and spicy aftertaste with fadpræg without it drying "

Werner Nakel have unconditional Germany's safest Spätburgunder hand. It is clearly expressed in his base Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir in France). A seductive nose of cherry and raspberry blend with a nice mineral and fruity flavor in the mouth. The wine is perfect for heavy fish dishes, pork and veal. To get maximum benefit should the wine drunk by 16-17 degrees.
quote:
Originally posted by swinter:
I guess it's not too outrageous when you consider that it's hard to find an Ontario pinot noir for less than $40.


It's still outrageous, as is the fact you can't find an Ontario pinot noir for fewer than $40.
I went into the Laird St LCBO yesterday and their Vintages section looked like Mother Hubbard's cupboard - nothng left to sell. So the 19th release is going out on the floor on Monday as soon as the truck pulls in.

Too bad there's hardly anything I want to buy... LOL
quote:
Originally posted by CSM:
quote:
Originally posted by swinter:
I guess it's not too outrageous when you consider that it's hard to find an Ontario pinot noir for less than $40.


It's still outrageous, as is the fact you can't find an Ontario pinot noir for fewer than $40.

I agree. That's the point I was trying to make. I think it's actually more outrageous that Ontario producers making pinot don't make anything I've been impressed by for under $40, and I could still find one from another country that's better and cheaper. I haven't been able to find any bargains in my own country.
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
Have you opened the Malakoff yet? How did you find it?


No I have not open one yet. Just going off the reviews on CT. Wine Canuck recently posted notes. I bought the Tournon and am looking to do a comparison in the future. Really enjoy N.Rhone Chapoutier. From the notes on the Malakoff, it's more N.Rhone than fruit bomb Aussie.
quote:
Originally posted by Fowler52:
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
Have you opened the Malakoff yet? How did you find it?


No I have not open one yet. Just going off the reviews on CT. Wine Canuck recently posted notes. I bought the Tournon and am looking to do a comparison in the future. Really enjoy N.Rhone Chapoutier. From the notes on the Malakoff, it's more N.Rhone than fruit bomb Aussie.


My notes in CT from December 22...

A stellar night of a couple of 94 pointers, this along with the 2005 Elderton Command were both stunning wines, this was definitely from a cooler climate and had subtle freshness and complexity over the Command and although I scored them the same, this had a very slight edge, and was over $30 cheaper to boot - Dark, full bodied with a nose of raspberry, blueberry, plum, spice, pepper vanilla, amazing acidity, very well structured, complex and balanced with years to go, sweet, vibrant and intense on the palate with excellent length, a great wine! (94 Points). (402 views)

Wonderful stuff, sort of started a mini revival for me in terms of Oz..

- Ian
It was for IT.

I generally thought BDM's needed more time to come around, but I'm fairly inexperienced so if you have insight to the contrary I'd also love to hear it! Also any producers you think would be more approachable younger, as my cellar is very young and I don't have easy access to older vintages.

Edited for clarification.
Well, to get the full experience of Brunello, it does need cellaring. Obviously there are vintage and producer discrepancies, not to mention vineyard variations since Montalcino has many microclimates within it. Generally speaking, from excellent vintages, I like 10+ years on them, and 6-8 from average-to-very good vintages at a minimum.

That said, young Brunello can be consumed, but it's finicky. I've found that you can check in on bottles within the first 6-12 months of release before they shut down. Sure, you won't get the full development that only bottle age will provide, but at least you can get a sense of the wine at a young age. The problem is that this guideline that I use is based on release from the cellar - not from when it shows up in the market. DOCG laws dictate that Brunello can't be released to market until five years after the harvest - therefore 2007 Brunello couldn't be sold until 2012. As a result, you're playing with fire drinking 2007s now, as they may be open and drinking well, or they may have already shut down. Since 2007 was a warmer vintage, that "open" window seems to be a little longer. 2006s at the same point were already shut down pretty firmly. Again, I'm making generalizations.

Anyway, there are several threads on Brunello producers, aging, etc, with great comments from the Italophiles on this board such as Longboarder, Jochems, PurpleHaze, and others. A quick search will point you in the right direction.

As for the 2007 Caprili, if you have access to some, I'd give it a shot. I followed a bottle over four hours last night and it was very enjoyable. Much better than dealing with the -14C weather here in Toronto.

Here's a link to my note on the wine.
quote:
Originally posted by ABryce:
Awesome, thanks for the note! Do you think it would reward with more time in the cellar?


No doubt it's meant for the long haul as it truly came across as more northern Rhone in style..The vibrancy and structure should make this a wine with a long life..

The subjective part is 'will it reward' more time and my short answer is it's drinking so beautifully now, why bother waiting but there were a few 'pros' that said it should evolve more over the 3-4 years, but does that mean better? Who knows....

On a side note, had the Tournon from this release on Sunday night and it was almost as wonderful and a real steal for $30:

My note in CT:

Not quite as good as the Malakoff, but still a stunning very 'Northern Rhone' style Shiraz that was absolutely delicious after an hour or so of aeration, the future of 'serious' Aussie reds? - Dark red, full bodied with a nose of plum, blueberry, raspberry, meat, pepper and vanilla, impeccably integrated and structured, silky smooth on the palate with excellent length, very tasty! (93 Points). (88 views)

Nice stuff, hat's off to Mr. Chapoutier..

Cheers,

- Ian

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