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quote:
Originally posted by Mimik:
It’s good and interesting but also on Netflix was a movie called burnt with Bradley cooper and sienna miller about the life of chef restaurant owners. Very interesting movie.
Burnt was universally panned by chefs. I watched a little bit of it on a plane and it didn’t grab me.

As I said in another thread, Ugly Delicious is awesome.
Just my 2 cents.
Overall really enjoyed the show and appreciate David Chang.
While I understand the overall theme of the show, it started getting annoying by the end. Is Asian food really underappreciated? Get over it, it's actually not.

One point that really got me was when he was eating dumplings in Sydney and discussing the price of a bowl of pasta vs. a plate of dumplings.
Not a fair comparison imo; the most basic factor being the Asian dumpling is essentially finished when it is made. As seen on the show and in every dumpling house, they are left in steam baskets ready for the order to come in piled high.

The Italian version requires a skilled person to execute the second half of the process.
On the basic side this will include blanching the pasta to the proper texture, making a sauce (which could be simple or another whole process), creating the proper viscosity, finishing and plating.
And in saying that, the skilled person can only make so many of these dishes at a time meaning more skilled labour$ needs to be hired to accommodate multiple orders.

Pretty well impossible to do properly in a commercial establishment and turn any kind of profit at $8 a plate Mr. Chang.
If you liked Ugly Delicious, I recommended checking out David Chang's and Peter Meehan's predecessor: the quarterly magazine called Lucky Peach.

The magazine ran for 6 years. Fantastic food writing, with the same quirky, irreverent style (both the writing and the visuals) as their subsequent TV series. It had contributions from dozens of writers and chefs including semi-regular pieces by Anthony Bourdain. As founders (and publisher and editor), Chang and Meehan were also regular contributors.

It won the James Beard Award for food publication of the year.

The magazine folded with issue 24 in the fall of 2017 and their TV series debuted not long afterwards.

Cover price was around $15/issue, and you can pick up back issues fairly cheaply on Ebay ($12-20), except for the first issue which goes for stupid prices these days.
quote:
Originally posted by mangiare:

One point that really got me was when he was eating dumplings in Sydney and discussing the price of a bowl of pasta vs. a plate of dumplings.
Not a fair comparison imo; the most basic factor being the Asian dumpling is essentially finished when it is made. As seen on the show and in every dumpling house, they are left in steam baskets ready for the order to come in piled high.

The Italian version requires a skilled person to execute the second half of the process.
On the basic side this will include blanching the pasta to the proper texture, making a sauce (which could be simple or another whole process), creating the proper viscosity, finishing and plating.
And in saying that, the skilled person can only make so many of these dishes at a time meaning more skilled labour$ needs to be hired to accommodate multiple orders.


Definitely not true

There is a huge technique in properly cooking a dumpling and not just making it.

Ever have a dumpling break on you mid cook? How about one that exploded while steaming too close to the water? One that became a soggy mess because you didnt properly distribute the dumpling? How about two dumplings sticking together and then ripping? What about the fact that different flour blends and different water ratios means that different dumpling styles have different styles of cooking?

Then there's also shanghai style dumplings or taiwanese style dumplings that are MADE to order. In the busy restos it's like 8-10 people literally folding and making soup dumplings non stop with a chef that ensures that each basket is properly steamed to the right temperature to ensure that your soup dumpling has the right texture and temperature.

Shanghainese style also has pan fried soup dumplings (my favorite) that allow requires the right oil temperature otherwise you'll lift the dumpling without its bottom. Also improper cooking means the top of the dumpling skin is raw and the bottom becomes hard as rock.

So yes, the generic frozen store bought ones can be as simple as boiling water and throw them in, but i'd argue it's the same with pasta. You can certainly spend timing making proper vinegar/gingered dipping sauce for dumplings. Or a reduced hoisan garlic mix with a touch of vinegar, or the japanese style mirin, sake, rice vinegar with scallion mix.

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