I just love truffles, and crave white truffles. I can still close my eyes and taste the white truffles we enjoyed last fall in Paris. (Michel Rostang)

Question, why can truffles not be farmed like most other things we all enjoy?
Original Post
Aren't ther several types of funghi that cannot be farmed? I thought the reason morel, bluefoot, chanterelle, porcini/cepes, etc were all so expensive is that they cannot be farmed. Presumably this is because since they are funghi the most you can do is create the right conditions for them to grow and then wait and see what happens. I imagine this is even harder for truffles as they grow underground. Again, this is only a guess; someone who actually knows what they are writing about hopefully will chime in. But, that would be my guess.
Many fungi cannot be farmed, but will only occur in the wild naturally. Sadly, its like that for many of the best. Chanterelles, Porcini and truffles included. I can't remember why this is exactly, but people have been trying to cultivate them for a long time and have had no success.

I guess the closest thing for truffles is that some christmas tree farms in the northwest will have a crop of truffles each season, where they have essentially copied their natural habitat.

Burned areas also tend to have truffles, and in certain parts of Europe there have problems with land owners burning parts of their property just as an attempt to create truffle habitat.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
If you knew what I paid for the entire white truffle last year you would think I'm nuts... or perhaps just confirm that I am. Wink


Well, I doubt you are actually serious about running with the bulls next year. But, if you are, then yes, very nuts, indeed! Big Grin

I've never bought a fresh whole truffle. But even when I buy my white truffl oil for $32/200ml I shake my head in amazement.
quote:
Originally posted by winetarelli:
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
If you knew what I paid for the entire white truffle last year you would think I'm nuts... or perhaps just confirm that I am. Wink


Well, I doubt you are actually serious about running with the bulls next year. But, if you are, then yes, very nuts, indeed! Big Grin... Very serious

I've never bought a fresh whole truffle. But even when I buy my white truffl oil for $32/200ml I shake my head in amazement.
... White's were selling for over $2000 per pound last fall. Eek
quote:
Well, I doubt you are actually serious about running with the bulls next year. But, if you are, then yes, very nuts, indeed! ... Very serious


This is spooky, since my eldest son and I are planning to go to Pamplona and he's running while I attempt to film the event. Does that mean I'm nuts as well? Oy vey!

I will NOT however pay $2000 per lb for 'shrooms
(regardless of their variety).
quote:
Originally posted by DoktaP:
quote:
Well, I doubt you are actually serious about running with the bulls next year. But, if you are, then yes, very nuts, indeed! ... Very serious


This is spooky, since my eldest son and I are planning to go to Pamplona and he's running while I attempt to film the event. Does that mean I'm nuts as well? Oy vey!

I will NOT however pay $2000 per lb for 'shrooms
(regardless of their variety).


I did not buy a pound... and I like your son already. Wink
There are Truffle Farms. There are currently 300-500 here in the states. They are rarely over a acre in size. Oregon is becoming known for their truffles. True, they are not quite as good as the white alba. Try a company called Mikuni. You can buy fresh, canned, oil, and IQF (Individually Quick Frozen) Truffles from them. I usually buy their oregon IQF. That way I can thaw out one whenever I want to use it. It makes it so I readily have some available year round on a whim, they have a better flavor than the canned, and truer flavor than the oil. Again, they are not as nice as a fresh white alba and can be inconsistent in size.
Don't buy truffle oil or canned truffles. They're a waste! Wait for the real thing and shell out the dough. I've done at least one truffle dinner each year (toward December) - some black, some white - for the past four years, and am looking forward to the one this year also.
Last whole truffle I bought was at the last magnum party in Seattle. Brought it home along with some chanterelles and made a risotto. Had a nice barolo to go with it.

The last truffle dish I had was popcorn with chopped truffles. Those of you out there who have been to The Kitchen in Sacramento in the last year or two know what I am talking about.... Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Dom'n'Vin'sDad:

Last whole truffle I bought was at the last magnum party in Seattle. Brought it home along with some chanterelles and made a risotto.


The whole white truffle we had was also served over simple risotto at Michel Rostang... and was divine. Smile

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×