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Besides my interest in experimenting with different EVOOs (I have a small collection in the kitchen), I have a new interest in truffle oil. I don't know much about truffle oil. But what sparked my interested in learning more is that on the bottles I bought, it says "infused with olive oil." How much of this bottle is truffle oil? 10%? 20%? 50%? I also haven't acquired the liking of truffle oil. Is there anything that I should start out with?
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May I ask why you are interested in it if you do not like it?

Without knowing what you bought, I can't tell you how much truffle is in the oil.

I like to make mashed potatoes and drizzle a bit of truffle oil on top. It's a great cold weather food. I had to edit to say I agree with the french fry recommendation.
Last edited by een
Consider stopping by Taverna. And, no matter what else anyone may order, get at least one side of the Risotto al Parmigiano All'Olio Tartufato.

It's a low-key place, except on Fri or Sat nights when the Park Cities "beautiful people" scene is in full tilt. (I actually prefer it on the weekend evenings, even though I'm not typically in to the "see and be seen" thing.) It's fun.

Chef Boyardee has not herself yet cooked with truffle oil. But, I do seem to like what others do with it. Big Grin
For the price, it sounds like it will be more olive than truffle oil.

White truffle oil is milder than black truffle oil. You may also want to try it in a risotto or a polenta or on steamed fresh vegetables. It works well with a very simple omelette.

It should be used in a couple of months and you should store it in a cool dark place.

Truffle honey is very good on a proscuitto sandwich. Truffle salt is a mixture of ground black truffles and sea salt. Tasty.
quote:
Originally posted by just a skosh:
Consider stopping by Taverna. And, no matter what else anyone may order, get at least one side of the Risotto al Parmigiano All'Olio Tartufato.

It's a low-key place, except on Fri or Sat nights when the Park Cities "beautiful people" scene is in full tilt. (I actually prefer it on the weekend evenings, even though I'm not typically in to the "see and be seen" thing.) It's fun.

Chef Boyardee has not herself yet cooked with truffle oil. But, I do seem to like what others do with it. Big Grin
Thanks! I will put it on my "to do" list...just knocked out one "to do" (Babe's) that has been on the list for over a year. Whew!
quote:
Originally posted by Bella Donna:
Besides my interest in experimenting with different EVOOs (I have a small collection in the kitchen), I have a new interest in truffle oil. I don't know much about truffle oil. But what sparked my interested in learning more is that on the bottles I bought, it says "infused with olive oil." How much of this bottle is truffle oil? 10%? 20%? 50%? I also haven't acquired the liking of truffle oil. Is there anything that I should start out with?


Truffles are fungi, just like mushrooms. They have absolutely NO oil in them. Big Grin

Truffle oil is made when you either extract liquid from the truffles (mushrooms contain a lot of water) or chop up the truffles, or do both, and then infuse a good quality oil with the flavour of the truffle. You can make your own if you buy some very fresh black or white truffles, though the oils I've bought that have been commercially produced are pretty good. I made my own only one time and I'd rather use the truffle in a recipe than waste it on the oil in future.

Truffles are the earthiest of all the fungi in flavour, so I guess it's an acquired taste. I like the oil best when a small quantity is poured over mushroom risotto while it's still hot-- the aromatics take a big leap if it's good oil. And like other infused oils, the flavour doesn't last forever so it's a good idea to use it up fairly quickly and not let it sit in a cupboard for a year.
Good question. I wanted to try it myself. I was going to put it on top of mashed potatoes or fries. Also, on a brushetta type appetizer with mushrooms on top.
quote:
Originally posted by Bella Donna:
Besides my interest in experimenting with different EVOOs (I have a small collection in the kitchen), I have a new interest in truffle oil. I don't know much about truffle oil. But what sparked my interested in learning more is that on the bottles I bought, it says "infused with olive oil." How much of this bottle is truffle oil? 10%? 20%? 50%? I also haven't acquired the liking of truffle oil. Is there anything that I should start out with?
I've found that many restaurants put WAY too much truffle oil on dishes that have it, and it overpowers the flavors of everything else. Using it sparingly though, imo, can make some dishes wonderful. I do a good lobster martini with chopped up lobster claw meat, diced tomato, shallots, a little butter, chives, a few drops of truffle oil, sauteed and served over mashed potatoes in a martini glass.
I went to Tuscany's biggest truffle festival in November in a little town called San Miniato not too far away from Florence.
You could buy anything from the real thing (white truffles that were bigger than your hand). The big ones were around 2.500 Euro a kilo and the smaller ones sold for two or three hundred less. Then you could get all kinds of jarred pastes and butters, truffles in oil or, the other way around, oil scented with truffles.
On the menu at the feast there was more than the usual pasta with truffle shavings that you find in a lot of restaurants this time of year. You could get eggs with truffle shavings, white pizza with truffles, fried polenta with truffle sauce, chocolate with truffles, truffle gelato, and so on, and so on....
It was fabulous and when I think of it the intensive truffle smell the whole town had comes right back to me. Very recommendable experience if any of you make it over here.

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