Skip to main content

Recette des tripes à la mode de Caen

Ingrédients pour 10 personnes : 3,5 kg de tripes de bœuf (panse, feuillet, bonnet, caillette) blanchies, 1 pied de bœuf cuit et coupé en deux, 1 kg de carottes, 2 gros oignons, 1 poireau, 8 gousses d’ail, 3 clous de girofle, 1 vingtaine de grains de poivre entiers, 1 bouquet garni (thym, laurier et persil), 1 bouteille de cidre brut, 1 petit verre de calvados, 1 verre de farine, sel.
Préparation : 30 minutes. Cuisson : 15 heures.
Réalisation : se procurer les tripes blanchies ainsi que le pied de bœuf chez le tripier. Placer une assiette retournée au fond de la tripière pour éviter que les tripes n’attachent. Couper les tripes en carrés de 4 à 5 cm. Peler, laver et couper les carottes en rondelles. Peler et couper les oignons en quartiers. Laver et couper le poireau en fines rondelles. Enfermer les aromates (bouquet garni, gousses d’ail pelées, clous de girofle, grains de poivre, quartiers d’oignons, rondelles de poireau) dans un carré de mousseline. Disposer au fond de la tripière tout ce qui n’est pas tripes (légumes et aromates) de façon à créer un lit confortable. Saler de haut goût. Ajouter les tripes. Mouiller de cidre et d’un verre de calvados, à hauteur des viandes. Préparer le lutage en malaxant la farine avec de l’eau. Placer le couvercle sur la tripière et le souder hermétiquement en le lutant. Cuire à four très doux (100°C) pendant quinze heures : les tripes doivent cuire à petit frémissement sans jamais bouillir. En fin de cuisson, dégager le couvercle, le soulever, attendre quelques minutes et dégraisser le bouillon. Ôter les os du pied de bœuf et le sachet d’aromates. Les tripes devant impérativement se déguster bien chaudes sous peine d’être indigestes. Les arroser de cidre bouché.
Note : Certains tapissent quelquefois la tripière avec une grande couenne de lard fraîche, côté gras contre les parois.
Original Post
Irwin's translation, with some assistance from Google.


Recipe for tripe in the style of Caen: (serves 10 people)
Ingredients: (note: one pound is about 2.2 kg--unless I have this backwards). Vinoslob reports that I had this wrong originally---it is: 1 Kg.= 2.2 Lbs. Thanks for the correction.
3.5 kg of ox tripe;
1 cow's foot split in two.
1 kg of carrots, 2 large onions, 1 leek, 8 cloves of garlic, 3 cloves, 20 whole peppercorns 1 pouch containing spicesFrownthyme, bay leaves and parsley), 1 bottle of cider, 1 small glass of apple-brandy, 1 glass of flour, salt. (How big the cider bottle or the glass for the flour is unknown)
Preparation: 30 minutes. Cooking: 15 hours. Here's how you do it:
Get the tripe bleached as well as the foot of ox by your local butcher. (yeah, right). Place a plate turned over on the bottom of the tripe to prevent it from sticking. (To what?).
Cut the tripe in squares from 4 to 5 cm. (2.54 cm = one inch)
Peel, wash and cut carrots into discs.
Peel and cut onions into quarters.
Wash and cut leek in small discs.
Tie up the spices, including the peeled cloves of garlic, cloves, peppercorns, onion quarters, leek discs) in a pouch of muslin.
Lay out on the bottom of the tripe pan everything but the tripe, (vegetables and spices) in order to create a comfortable bed. Salt to taste. Add the tripe. Pour on the cider and the apple-brandy, just to the height of the meats.
Prepare sealant (?) by mixing the flour with water. Place the lid on the pot and hermetically seal it using the flour/water mixture. (?) Cook on really low heat(100°C = 212 F) for fifteen hours: The tripe must cook barely simmering, without boiling.

At the end of the 15 hours, (if you are not totally grossed out) release the lid, raise it, wait a few minutes and skip the fat off the liquid. Remove the bones of the foot of the cow and the pouch of spices.

The tripe must be consumed hot, or else it is not digestible. (I think)

Sprinkle champagne cider on this stuff.
Note: Optional to line the tripe pot with a large fresh bacon pork rind, fatty side against the walls.

The likelihood of my cooking this, or eating it, is about as great as my opening a bottle of 1945 La Tache.

I am nauseous already.
Last edited by irwin
i think that you are actually supposed to use a specially designed pot for the tripe. Jean Eric uses the term "tripiere", which I think would be the vessel in which this is cooked.

I am not sure if the cow's foot is supposed to be the foot of a cow or an ox, and there is no indication as to whether it needs to be a left foot or a right foot, or a front foot or a hind foot.

I think this is a pretty popular dish in France. I remember seeing a large percentage of bovine creatures with crutches and limping. Big Grin
Yes, its backwards. 1 Kg.= 2.2 Lbs.
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
Irwin's translation, with some assistance from Google.


Recipe for tripe in the style of Caen: (serves 10 people)
Ingredients: (note: one pound is about 2.2 kg--unless I have this backwards).
3.5 kg of ox tripe;
1 cow's foot split in two.
1 kg of carrots, 2 large onions, 1 leek, 8 cloves of garlic, 3 cloves, 20 whole peppercorns 1 pouch containing spicesFrownthyme, bay leaves and parsley), 1 bottle of cider, 1 small glass of apple-brandy, 1 glass of flour, salt. (How big the cider bottle or the glass for the flour is unknown)
Preparation: 30 minutes. Cooking: 15 hours. Here's how you do it:
Get the tripe bleached as well as the foot of ox by your local butcher. (yeah, right). Place a plate turned over on the bottom of the tripe to prevent it from sticking. (To what?).
Cut the tripe in squares from 4 to 5 cm. (2.54 cm = one inch)
Peel, wash and cut carrots into discs.
Peel and cut onions into quarters.
Wash and cut leek in small discs.
Tie up the spices, including the peeled cloves of garlic, cloves, peppercorns, onion quarters, leek discs) in a pouch of muslin.
Lay out on the bottom of the tripe pan everything but the tripe, (vegetables and spices) in order to create a comfortable bed. Salt to taste. Add the tripe. Pour on the cider and the apple-brandy, just to the height of the meats.
Prepare sealant (?) by mixing the flour with water. Place the lid on the pot and hermetically seal it using the flour/water mixture. (?) Cook on really low heat(100°C = 212 F) for fifteen hours: The tripe must cook barely simmering, without boiling.

At the end of the 15 hours, (if you are not totally grossed out) release the lid, raise it, wait a few minutes and skip the fat off the liquid. Remove the bones of the foot of the cow and the pouch of spices.

The tripe must be consumed hot, or else it is not digestible. (I think)

Sprinkle champagne cider on this stuff.
Note: Optional to line the tripe pot with a large fresh bacon pork rind, fatty side against the walls.

The likelihood of my cooking this, or eating it, is about as great as my opening a bottle of 1945 La Tache.

I am nauseous already.
This subject was a joke of course and thanks to Irwin for the translation. It happened exactly what I expected: judgements about words. In fact no one eated that so I just read literary opinions, it's very easy (too easy). I did the same in the past with scottish haggis (similar to tripes) but after trying it ... I liked it.
As french, americans can have an "a priori" judgement.
Personnally, I eat tripes one time a year, it's good but it's enough; in this class of meal I prefer "Cassoulet" or "Potée".
Before editing his post (I noticed that) Irwin thought that a "La Tâche" could be a good choice (another joke, maybe... Wink ) . Now I don't have any more opinion about this kind of decision, I know mine and that's it. But it let me tell you that people who invented "La Tâche" or "Yquem" also invented "Tripes à la mode de Caen". Do you think there is a mistake somewhere? In my mind no! In yours of course yes.
What I mean is that is very easy to discuss, to copy... A bit more difficult to invent. It's for this reason this is my last post here. I had good time and some guys are really interesting... The others have their certainties... But who cares?
Some friends for dinner saturday night, about wines: Pouilly Fuissé "Terroir de Fuissé" 2001 Merlin (I recommand), Latricières Chambertin 2003 (this millésime is really terrific/wonderful as young!) Domaine Chris D. Newman (An american winemaker in Beaune, we really are proud of him as he makes great wines, and you can be proud of him...too). For dessert, my last discovery: "Vent d'ange" muscat Chateau de Rey... What is it? A muscat de Rivesaltes aged in oak barrel, flavors are similar to what you can find in a "Montrachet", but it's not, of course. Really interesting... About food, no Tripes and no Mac Do!
Take care! Smile
quote:
Originally posted by Jean Eric:
Latricières Chambertin 2003 (this millésime is really terrific/wonderful as young!) Domaine Chris D. Newman (An american winemaker in Beaune, we really are proud of him as he makes great wines, and you can be proud of him...too).


What a coincidence. I saw Chris Friday at a local wine shop (he's from La Nouvelle Orleans). He's a nice, jovial guy but I'll not so sure I'd call his wines great. Then again, my criticism is tainted with just a bit of jealousy.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×