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I just discovered the Bearded Butcher's YouTube channel. If you don't know them this one about Grass Fed Beef vs. Grain Fed Beef is probably my favorite. They are big fans, for different reasons, of the Big Green Egg and the Traeger. The Traiger seems like such and interesting idea. I don't know if they created the electric augur pellet method but they certainly popularized it. So I look online on Amazon and I keep reading about different things breaking and then waiting for weeks or months to get it and then trying to install it yourself. Particularly there's a big knock on the support department with no returned calls or emails and again long backorders for parts. What is your experience? Great when it works but expect it to fail?

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When Trager grills first came out they were very well built machines. Mechanics were reliable,  the steel was thick enough for good heat retention, and I'm told customer service was very good. The company was sold in 2007 and they stopped making them in the USA, and now all Tragers come from China. As a result, they are now very cheaply made with thin metal walls and components that break down more easily, not to mention the poor customer service. I would not buy one.

Also, I will not buy their pellets. You won't find this information on the bags, or without doing some heavy research, the information is deeply hidden on the website. But they are not what they are advertised to be. It will say something like "100% hardwoods", but that is misleading. If you were to buy cherry for example, you might think you're getting cherry wood pellets. Not so. Half or more of the makeup of the pellet is oak or alder, and cherry would fill in the rest. Also, Trager is the only pellet manufacturer that I know of that uses "flavoring oils" in their pellets. I don't know about you, but I don't want vague "oils" coating my food.

Last edited by mneeley490
@mneeley490 posted:

When Trager grills first came out they were very well built machines. Mechanics were reliable,  the steel was thick enough for good heat retention, and I'm told customer service was very good. The company was sold in 2007 and they stopped making them in the USA, and now all Tragers come from China. As a result, they are now very cheaply made with thin metal walls and components that break down more easily, not to mention the poor customer service. I would not buy one.

Also, I will not buy their pellets. You won't find this information on the bags, or without doing some heavy research, the information is deeply hidden on the website. But they are not what they are advertised to be. It will say something like "100% hardwoods", but that is misleading. If you were to buy cherry for example, you might think you're getting cherry wood pellets. Not so. Half or more of the makeup of the pellet is oak or alder, and cherry would fill in the rest. Also, Trager is the only pellet manufacturer that I know of that uses "flavoring oils" in their pellets. I don't know about you, but I don't want vague "oils" coating my food.

this man speaketh the truth

I have a Green Mountain Grill, Daniel Boone model that I got on a good sale. I like it, but it's not without its problems. (Had to replace the empty bin sensor, as the alarm wouldn't stop going off even when full. Not great at 3am. Also, takes some adjustment thru trial and error to get it to heat evenly.)

Recteq is high quality, and not inexpensive. But you get what you pay for.

Last edited by mneeley490

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