TN: 2005 Chateau Puygueraud (France, Bordeaux, Libournais, Cotes de Francs)

  • 2005 Château Puygueraud - France, Bordeaux, Libournais, Côtes de Francs (8/10/2008)
    popped and poured a glass, then splash decanted half of the bottle. Set the other half aside for tomorrow. initial nose was of dark cherries and a hint of dusty earth. Dark inky wine in the glass. First taste - dark cherry and berry fruits that were almost immediately hidden by the tannins. The tannins were strong - not strong enough to hide the fruit - but way more than I like in my wine - it was similar to biting into an unripe persimmon. The wine was very tight until it had spent an hour in the decanter. As the tannins mellowed - the wine opened up and the dark cherry fruit and dark berry flavors came back out. Layered on top of the fruit was a very slight dusty earthyness. By hour two in the decanter, the tannins had softened enough that I was not having to "read" what was underneath the tannin. This wine has all the right elements. I'll update for day two after tomorrow. I gave the wine 91 pts based on where it was when I had my last glass (it started much lower because of the heavy tanins) - it will probably add another point or two with a few years of bottle age. This is a steal at $30. (91 pts.)

Posted from CellarTracker
Original Post
DAY TWO

same color, more heat on the nose than yesterday. Tannins are still present - but not nearly as strong as yesterday. The dusty earthyness taste is a little more prominent and the dark cherry/dark berry flavors are a little more tart. That said - still a very good bottle of wine for the money - just too young. Give it time because of the tannins - I'll be opening another one NEXT winter to see where it is.


G
Thirstyman,

Thank you so much for the notes, I usually find second day notes as valuable as first day ones. Although, unless you buy a BUNCH, maybe hold off a bit longer than 18 months to pop another? I'm hoping to hold off for another four or five years before I try another (first one was corked).

Also, you might try the Petit Bocq, if it's available locally. It's an even less auspicious cheapie that is a QPR winner.

Again, thanks,
quote:
Originally posted by JimBrennan:
I thought it was a good value for the $15/bottle I spent. Can't say I would spend twice that for it given all the '05 petit chateaus out there, but as long as you're happy with it for 2x, I'm glad for ya!


Thanks JimBrennan - I would be interested in hearing which of the 05 petit chateaus you believe to be equal or better at a lesser price. I am not being sarcastic - I am serious. thanks in advance

G
2005 Château Puygueraud - France, Bordeaux, Libournais, Côtes de Francs (9/13/2008)
WIML91?

Tasted September 13, 2008 at an offline.

Opened and decanted about 4 hours before double decanting back into the bottle and serving a little over an hour later. Purple color in the glass, clear hue throughout. Nose of currants and plums. Flavors of berries and plums. Medium to bright acidity, medium to firm tannins, medium to full body. Hold. (91 pts.)
quote:
Originally posted by wineismylife:
2005 Château Puygueraud - France, Bordeaux, Libournais, Côtes de Francs (9/13/2008)
WIML91?

Tasted September 13, 2008 at an offline.

Opened and decanted about 4 hours before double decanting back into the bottle and serving a little over an hour later. Purple color in the glass, clear hue throughout. Nose of currants and plums. Flavors of berries and plums. Medium to bright acidity, medium to firm tannins, medium to full body. Hold. (91 pts.)


HOLD? Did you not see the troll R&R Cowboy said? Wink
quote:
Originally posted by WineTrooper:
March WS 2005 Bordeaux issue states 70%Merlot, 25% cab franc, 5% malbec.


Interesting...I went to a Thienpont tasting of these wines and the Vieux Certan when the '98's were released. (2000?) The vineyard and blend was as I listed above, but I'm sure WS is right.
quote:
Originally posted by WineTrooper:
W+A, no worries you may be correct. I am just curious if Cotes de Francs estates tended to go heavy on the Cab Franc/Malbec.


Oh, I'm curious now. The WS blend sure makes more sense, but I did find my notes at work. The blend was a I recall.

I'm soooo confused. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by thirsty man:
before anyone chimes in on the QPR of the wine and relates how they used to split a bottle of this wine with Honus Wagner and it only cost a nickel - Try the wine. I think it is better than many $50 bordeauxs and I think its a steal at $30.


That was quite a funny line..I'm usually the first to say.. 'i remember when..'
Bought a case of the '98 upon release at $12/per)--insert Honus Wagnor line here Razz
I had bottle a year ago and it was still delicious and I did not hesitate to buy a case of the 05' when it when it was released. A Great buy no doubt.
quote:
Originally posted by wine+art:
quote:
Originally posted by WineTrooper:
W+A, no worries you may be correct. I am just curious if Cotes de Francs estates tended to go heavy on the Cab Franc/Malbec.


Oh, I'm curious now. The WS blend sure makes more sense, but I did find my notes at work. The blend was a I recall.

I'm soooo confused. Wink

The reason for the confusion is that Puygueraud also makes (in some vintages) a Cuvée George bottling, which is typically the 35% Malbec, 35% Cabernet Franc, 20% Merlot and 10% Cabernet Sauvignon blend that you mentioned earlier. They made only the regular bottling in 2005, which is 70%Merlot, 25% cab franc, 5% malbec as indicated above.
quote:
Originally posted by thirsty man:
before anyone chimes in on the QPR of the wine and relates how they used to split a bottle of this wine with Honus Wagner and it only cost a nickel - Try the wine. I think it is better than many $50 bordeauxs and I think its a steal at $30.


Well, I guess Honus is young again, since Zachys (typically a retailer who prices on the high end) dropped their price tag from $30 to $24 or month or so ago.

Also available at Calvert Woodley for $20.
quote:
Originally posted by JimBrennan:
quote:
Originally posted by thirsty man:
before anyone chimes in on the QPR of the wine and relates how they used to split a bottle of this wine with Honus Wagner and it only cost a nickel - Try the wine. I think it is better than many $50 bordeauxs and I think its a steal at $30.


Well, I guess Honus is young again, since Zachys (typically a retailer who prices on the high end) dropped their price tag from $30 to $24 or month or so ago.

Also available at Calvert Woodley for $20.


Hey - a good deal at $30 is a better deal at $20! Thanks for letting us know - I'll try to pick up a few more to share with Honus. Wink
I agree that a quality wine offered at $15 en primeur is a reasonable buy for $20.

Clearly, however, $30 was overpriced by retailers trying to see how much they could collect on release in conjunction with in-bottle ratings. Realistically, there was no way that a wine offered for $15 en primeur was going to hold a 100% once the initial post-score in-bottle price surge was over.
quote:
Originally posted by JimBrennan:
I agree that a quality wine offered at $15 en primeur is a reasonable buy for $20.

Clearly, however, $30 was overpriced by retailers trying to see how much they could collect on release in conjunction with in-bottle ratings. Realistically, there was no way that a wine offered for $15 en primeur was going to hold a 100% once the initial post-score in-bottle price surge was over.


Take the label away. A 92 point 2005 Bordeaux for $30 is acceptable QPR.
Pricing is about demand, with only a loose relationship to quality. And, of course, your argument begs the question of whether you'd rate it 92 double-blind... one man's 92 is another's 89 (which is the WA score fwiw)... or 85 or 95 or... etc.

Realistically, with a good vintage like 2005, there are many petit Bordeaux that would compare favorably for no more than $20, with the difference being that Suckling, Parker, etc, only review a handful and many fly under the radar.

In any case, demand doesn't merit the price, which is why it's coming down. Still, for those of you other there hell-bent on paying more than you need to, there's always these guys:
https://www.lsw.com/stores/nejaimes/wineselector/index....80393ddb795312779b6b
Razz
I have tried the wine and thought it was a good buy for $30. I have tried other nonrated wines from 2005 and thought some were good buys and some were not. None of the ones I have found locally were as good as the Puygueraud (although all were easier to spell). Trust me when I say I would prefer to pay $20 than $30 - but either way I think the QPR at $30 is there (and of course even better at $20). I'll be buying more to lay down.

G
quote:
Originally posted by JimBrennan:
Pricing is about demand, with only a loose relationship to quality. And, of course, your argument begs the question of whether you'd rate it 92 double-blind... one man's 92 is another's 89 (which is the WA score fwiw)... or 85 or 95 or... etc.

Realistically, with a good vintage like 2005, there are many petit Bordeaux that would compare favorably for no more than $20, with the difference being that Suckling, Parker, etc, only review a handful and many fly under the radar.


Care to help us out by listing several? Not much available in Toronto yet, but the ones that I have tried in this price range have been more miss than hit, and I don't think any were as good as the Puygueraud, though several were not without their charm. I would love more of these but I doubt our LCBO will get more of the 2005. I guess suggestions from people in Toronto would be the only ones that are useful, but I think I have already tried most of the $20-$35 2005 bordeaux that I have seen at the LCBO.

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