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quote:
Originally posted by Dave Tong BBP:
"Opened, not decanted"

The "not decanted" bit I get, but "opened"? Isn't that word redundant? Or maybe it's to distinguish from bottles that were sabred, or maybe "shotgunned"?


I use it to convey, that I opened it on the spot and it wasn't opened by a generous host that may have had it opened 2 hours earlier.

but, it would add to the flair of the TN to say ... "Tonged and decanted" i guess.
I don’t see why people criticize other peoples tasting notes so much. So it says ‘opened’, who cares? I would take that as a clue it was popped and poured, and not opened in advance. Better then not knowing how the wine was served or in what time line. Sure it would be more helpful to have written “opened and served right away” but I find more information is usually better then less. Unless the TN is offensive or completely useless, I don’t see a reason to criticize it...most people are doing the best they can to describe the wine they taste for the benefit of the readers. No wonder so many people don’t post their TNs.
Last edited by godx
quote:
Originally posted by godx:
I don’t see why people criticize other peoples tasting notes so much. So it says ‘opened’, who cares? I would take that as a clue it was popped and poured, and not opened in advance. Better then not knowing how the wine was served or in what time line. Sure it would be more helpful to have written “opened and served right away” but I find more information is usually better then less. Unless the TN is offensive or completely useless, I don’t see a reason to criticize it...most people are doing the best they can to describe the wine they taste for the benefit of the readers. No wonder so many people don’t post their TNs.


Good post godx.
If you don't like someone TNs, then too bad for you but I don't see the point to critize it. Nobody forces you to read it. People write about the wines the way they see it and if it doesn't fit your description, well all the better. Wine changes, evolves and shows differently everyday.
Also as DRAB mentioned, very funny to see people criticising and whining about notes regarding a wine they never had...
quote:
Originally posted by Dave Tong BBP:
There's a huge difference between being amused by a note and criticising it.
I fully understand what the note is saying, I just think it's funny.
For the record, I meant no disrespect the author of the original note.

My tasting notes are fair game; I generally post them via my blog.
I'm sure I've made some absolute howlers.


I hope I wasn't being too witty, but it was just too easy of a pun to pass on especially with port tongs.
quote:
Originally posted by GlennK:
I recently read “blue” sharpie pen on CT. Do sharpie pens smell different than other pens? Does the color matter? I think not.



Hehehe. I just smelled a few different Sharpies I had sitting on my desk. The yellow highlighter smelled very different from the red permanent one, although I don't think it had anything to do with the color. BTW, the red permanent Sharpie smelled similar, but not the same as the black Magic Marker I had on my desk.

FWIW, I often try wines I've never had because of other peoples tasting notes. Found some darned good wines that way.
quote:
Originally posted by shane:


Hehehe. I just smelled a few different Sharpies I had sitting on my desk. The yellow highlighter smelled very different from the red permanent one, although I don't think it had anything to do with the color. BTW, the red permanent Sharpie smelled similar, but not the same as the black Magic Marker I had on my desk.

Mr. Shane, would you please leave your desk and come with me? I have a cup for you to fill in the mens room...
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
quote:
Originally posted by shane:


Hehehe. I just smelled a few different Sharpies I had sitting on my desk. The yellow highlighter smelled very different from the red permanent one, although I don't think it had anything to do with the color. BTW, the red permanent Sharpie smelled similar, but not the same as the black Magic Marker I had on my desk.

Mr. Shane, would you please leave your desk and come with me? I have a cup for you to fill in the mens room...

Big Grin Big Grin
My personal dig is with people trying to write poetry rather than a useful tasting note. I call it Parker syndrome - the compulsion to use over the top descriptors (liquid rocks, scorched earth and the like) to make it seem like they are somehow smarter than everyone else. I don't find this kind of note terribly useful. Others enjoy reading and writing them. Different strokes.......
quote:
Originally posted by french16:
quote:
Originally posted by godx:
I don’t see why people criticize other peoples tasting notes so much. So it says ‘opened’, who cares? I would take that as a clue it was popped and poured, and not opened in advance. Better then not knowing how the wine was served or in what time line. Sure it would be more helpful to have written “opened and served right away” but I find more information is usually better then less. Unless the TN is offensive or completely useless, I don’t see a reason to criticize it...most people are doing the best they can to describe the wine they taste for the benefit of the readers. No wonder so many people don’t post their TNs.


Good post godx.
If you don't like someone TNs, then too bad for you but I don't see the point to critize it. Nobody forces you to read it. People write about the wines the way they see it and if it doesn't fit your description, well all the better. Wine changes, evolves and shows differently everyday.
Also as DRAB mentioned, very funny to see people criticising and whining about notes regarding a wine they never had...




I'm in total agreement with godx's post as well. Every data point helps in some way, even if it's just a minimal amount, in our constant attempts to purchase wisely, serve properly, open at the right time, etc. Why knock something that's free and might be useful?
quote:
My personal dig is with people trying to write poetry rather than a useful tasting note. I call it Parker syndrome - the compulsion to use over the top descriptors (liquid rocks, scorched earth and the like) to make it seem like they are somehow smarter than everyone else. I don't find this kind of note terribly useful. Others enjoy reading and writing them. Different strokes.......


I think this really comes down to imagination.

Some have it...some don't. Some like it some don't. There are varying degrees of use and acceptability from those judging the user. One thing we can agree on is that it would be pretty boring to read the note above by JonesWineNo1 all the time...."Wine. Red wine. Nose of grapes. Tastes like red wine. And grapes. Grapey finish. I liked it."

And, because someone may exercise it, doesn't mean you can imply "intent" on how they used it....ie: that they are trying to be "smarter" than everyone else. If that was the case then the smartest kids in every high school would be the drama geeks... Wink
quote:
Originally posted by dr.darkrichandbold:
quote:
My personal dig is with people trying to write poetry rather than a useful tasting note. I call it Parker syndrome - the compulsion to use over the top descriptors (liquid rocks, scorched earth and the like) to make it seem like they are somehow smarter than everyone else. I don't find this kind of note terribly useful. Others enjoy reading and writing them. Different strokes.......


I think this really comes down to imagination.

Some have it...some don't. Some like it some don't. There are varying degrees of use and acceptability from those judging the user. One thing we can agree on is that it would be pretty boring to read the note above by JonesWineNo1 all the time...."Wine. Red wine. Nose of grapes. Tastes like red wine. And grapes. Grapey finish. I liked it."

And, because someone may exercise it, doesn't mean you can imply "intent" on how they used it....ie: that they are trying to be "smarter" than everyone else. If that was the case then the smartest kids in every high school would be the drama geeks... Wink


I knew you'd get defensive on this thread, Big Grin but don't worry, you're not our Poet Laureate.
I'm relatively new around here, but my thought is that I'd far rather read a note that is baroque in its verbiage than the simple note suggested above, and I agree with all of those who have said something along those lines. I am glad that people take the time to write the notes, they help me, and if they want to wax poetic then more power to them, there's enough mediocrity in the world, strive for something more, even if you miss!
quote:
there's enough mediocrity in the world, strive for something more, even if you miss!

Wrong. That's what gave us Kelly Clarkston.

I think most of the things people say are pretty useless, and for that reason I hardly ever post TNs myself.

I do one from time to time if I think a wine is particularly interesting for some reason and I just want to get it some attention, but I don't think I've ever sought out any wine based on someone's TN.

Why?

Descriptors like:

White flowers. Rocks. Minerals. Minerality. Scorched earth. Violets (be honest - who has actually gotten down on the ground and smelled violets) Roses - another one. Come over and smell some of them and then tell me what the descriptor means. Cassis. Who eats them and who grows them?

Of course, descriptors are different from points. Regardless of the descriptor, if it has 93 points . . .
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
I think most of the things people say are pretty useless, and for that reason I hardly ever post TNs myself.

I do one from time to time if I think a wine is particularly interesting for some reason and I just want to get it some attention, but I don't think I've ever sought out any wine based on someone's TN.

Why?

Descriptors like:

White flowers. Rocks. Mineral and minerality. Scorched earth. Violets (be honest - who has actually gotten down on the ground and smelled violets? I have and they don't smell like any of the wines they supposedly describe.) Roses - another one. Come over and smell some of them and then tell me what the descriptor means. Cassis. Who eats them and who grows them?

Of course, descriptors are different from points. Regardless of the descriptor, if it has 93 points . . .


Amen GregT.

DRAB - Are you implying that those who don't appreciate such over the top descriptors lack imagination? If so, I think that attitude is pretty condescending and in a way, supports the point that I am trying to make. Please explain.....
quote:
Originally posted by dr.darkrichandbold:
quote:
I knew you'd get defensive on this thread, Big Grin but don't worry, you're not our Poet Laureate.


Not sure how you see anything about that statement as defensive (I'm stating it purely how it is), but then again I don't understand most of what you see... Roll Eyes


Geez, why dont you two get a room already and get it over with.
quote:
DRAB - Are you implying that those who don't appreciate such over the top descriptors lack imagination? If so, I think that attitude is pretty condescending and in a way, supports the point that I am trying to make. Please explain.....


If you look at this objectively, then IMHO it would come down to two things. Everyone has the mental capacity for, no, low, moderate, or high levels of imagination, and they appreciate imagination at no, low, moderate, or high levels. And, everyone would fall into some combination of these. Ie: someone who has low ability for imagination, but high appreciation for it...etc...etc... It has nothing to do with trying to interpret someone's intent based on the content of their imagination.

It would be like me saying you're condescending for describing in detail/illusion what your family room looks like. Whereas someone who describes it simply (ie: couch, T.V., bookshelf...period) is trying to be more humble. I don't think it's possible to interpret somebody's intent based on how they choose to describe something? And...if you wanted to extrapolate, then I (personally) would say someone who gives me a short quick answer is more likely to be condescending over someone who takes the time to describe in detail. But, in reality I have no basis for coming to this conclusion because there is no evidence to support secondary intent or alterior motive from sharing a description of their family room...only that they meant to share a description of their family room (however detailed or imaginary it may be).

Just my $.02....
quote:
Originally posted by Red guy in a blue state:
My personal dig is with people trying to write poetry rather than a useful tasting note. I call it Parker syndrome - the compulsion to use over the top descriptors (liquid rocks, scorched earth and the like) to make it seem like they are somehow smarter than everyone else. I don't find this kind of note terribly useful. Others enjoy reading and writing them. Different strokes.......


Maybe you should just stick to beer, then.! Big Grin Wink

There are extremes of course, notes that say nothing about the wine but about some dreamy trip the taster is taking. Now if the wine is really really fantastic, I don't mind if the taster embellishes a little in the TN. But if we're talking about Yellowtail, Houston we have a problem.
quote:
Originally posted by GregT:
quote:
there's enough mediocrity in the world, strive for something more, even if you miss!

Wrong. That's what gave us Kelly Clarkston.

I think most of the things people say are pretty useless, and for that reason I hardly ever post TNs myself.

I do one from time to time if I think a wine is particularly interesting for some reason and I just want to get it some attention, but I don't think I've ever sought out any wine based on someone's TN.

Why?

Descriptors like:

White flowers. Rocks. Minerals. Minerality. Scorched earth. Violets (be honest - who has actually gotten down on the ground and smelled violets) Roses - another one. Come over and smell some of them and then tell me what the descriptor means. Cassis. Who eats them and who grows them?

Of course, descriptors are different from points. Regardless of the descriptor, if it has 93 points . . .


violets and roses do smell different. ever had currant jam/jelly?...a lot of people have.
I'm with DRAB, GregT and Red Guy, you have the ultimate luxury here of not reading it at all, and by your own admission Greg you pay little attention. Just the fact that several people say they appreciate the notes should point to the fact that they are inherently of some worth.

As for Kelly Clarkson... ugh... but nonetheless, I don't have to listen to that crap, so more for the mediocre I say.

As for 93 points, well that is where the descriptor may help, because one man's 93 is not another's

I think that, beyond just the imagination, there is an issue of how, cognitively, smell matches to mental images - for example white flowers - such that one might not have to know what exactly white flowers smell like in order to match that descriptor mentally to a smell. My best friend is a neuroscientist, and I would actually like to ask him about this next time I speak to him, he is always great for bizarre tangents of how the brain works, and I find that stuff fascinating.

Other factors here include the vast disparity of smell and taste capabilities. Ever meet a coffee cupper? They can taste a cup and tell you what farm it came from, which year, and how it was roasted like it was nothing, and they can do it because they are extremely tuned to smell and flavor. Now you may argue that many posters of notes aren't so well tuned and they are just randomly assigning terms, but I would argue that they are on a learning curve, matching scents and flavors to mental images, and that while they may not be as consistent or precise as a professional, they are at least learning.

I suspect most professional critics have similarly adept noses and palates to the aforementioned coffee cuppers, so that we may not always agree with them but they still have gotten to where they are with an actual skill.

Finally, I echo the "stick to beer sentiment" but that does a disservice to most beer, so I say, stick to mass-produced beer, something that won't tax your intellect too much, maybe won't cause you such bellyaching...
Dislikes?

Anybody (we all know who Public Enemy #1 is) who insists that they know what flavors/sensations are inside of a person's mouth better than the taster does.

And, if somebody wants to post that they taste something obscure like "red oak" in a wine, let them. I once razzed a forumite for posting just that, only to find out that he was raised in the lumber industry and that smell/taste is as distinctive as sulfur or lemons to most of us. I'll never make that mistake again.

Likes?

People who take the time to post good notes on wines in a wide range of price points, not just the "look what I just drank, aren't you proud of me!?" wines.

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