What is your favorite corkscrew and why??

I'm a tad obsessed with finding the right corkscrew and I believe I've narrowed it down to the 'tradional' waiter's style... No 'Rabbit's or screw pulls for me (I have an 'Ah So', but have struggled with it to be honest).

The waiter's style suits me, and believe that the 'Holy Grail' of corkscrews for me is something that is large, heavy, open helix, traditional blade foil cutter, and (here's the hard part) a hinged 2 piece 'lever' that can adjust when you're at the second stage of removing the cork.

Many of the top models (Laguiole, etc.) have the 1 piece solid lever that generally have a second level built in, but does not have the flexible 2 piece lever. Even the one that is being heavily promoted in Canada, the 'Code 38 Stealth' model ($450!) seems like more of the same.

I just bought a beautifully made Legnoart model from Italy that had all of my desired features, but does not have the 2 staged lever - The same goes for the previous top model in my collection, the Vigneto 'Waiter's Friend' model - Very nice, but without the 2 piece lever I so desire (It also has a wierd internal circular bladed foil cutter that works maybe 50% of the time, and can only remove the upper part of the capsule vs. the whole piece, generally my preferred modus operandi).

There are few very cheap plastic type waiter's corkscrews that have the 2 piece lever, but they break easy, have no weight in the hand, are flimsy, etc. - Nothing of quality that I've seen has the desired lever.

The quest continues...

Cheers,

- Ian
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by EB Wine:
I use an ah so exclusively- once mastered, it's great. I save my corks and this generally leaves them undamaged.


The only problem with an Ah-So is a fully saturated soft cork. I don't use any one corkscrew exclusively.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by EB Wine:
I use an ah so exclusively- once mastered, it's great. I save my corks and this generally leaves them undamaged.


The only problem with an Ah-So is a fully saturated soft cork. I don't use any one corkscrew exclusively.

I wouldn't have considered anything BUT an Ah-So for a saturated cork Eek

How, then, do you deal with that, Board-O?
Ah so for me, but it's got to be the real McCoy (Monopole). I've tried others but I have found the forged steel to twist and warp.

The double-hinged waiters CS would be next in line. I don't mind the rabbit, but my wife sometimes lacks the muscle power if there's too much torque.

Interesting question and answers. I have a mini corkscrew collection and alternate from time to time for fun. However, if it's an older (and worthwhile) bottle, my default is always the Ah so.

Thanks for your kind words KSCO2.
I have a wooded flynut corkscrew I have used at home for 35+ years. I bought it in France when I was in college, so it had to be cheap.

I can not imagine how many 1000's of bottles it has opened over the years, and the worm is still very sharp and it works as well today as it did when I was drinking $1.99 wine. Big Grin

I have a number of waiter's corkscrews in my travel bag I use at BYOB restaurants and such. I would hate to think how many I have lost over the years.

I use a double prong for old wines, and my thumb and index finger for screw cap wines. Wink
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
... I'm not upset if I misplace one or a friend holds on to mine for a few months (are you reading this Gentleman farmer!! LOL)
PH


Clearly, Gentleman Farmer is a man without screwpulls.


OUCH!!! Where's the groaning graemlin?? Big Grin
Hey PH - I may give that one a shot.

Thanks!

- Ian

quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
THIS has been my go-to for the past couple years. Outstanding, easy to use, very heavy duty and cheap enough that I'm not upset if I misplace one or a friend holds on to mine for a few months (are you reading this Gentleman farmer!! LOL)

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
THIS has been my go-to for the past couple years. Outstanding, easy to use, very heavy duty and cheap enough that I'm not upset if I misplace one or a friend holds on to mine for a few months (are you reading this Gentleman farmer!! LOL)

PH


That's the same one I most often use.
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I've broken at least one of every type mentioned here. But this one has never let me down. Can't beat it's elegant simplicity.


I was forced to use one of these on a bottle of vintage port a few years back (a 1983 Warres if I recall, and the last time I did not have my own corkscrew along), and it formed a neat hole straight through the cork without making it budge...Absolutely crap.
quote:
Originally posted by IT:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I've broken at least one of every type mentioned here. But this one has never let me down. Can't beat it's elegant simplicity.


I was forced to use one of these on a bottle of vintage port a few years back (a 1983 Warres if I recall, and the last time I did not have my own corkscrew along), and it formed a neat hole straight through the cork without making it budge...Absolutely crap.


I've had that happen with a regular bottle of wine with one of those.

I find the Ah-So works best for me. Haven't had a problem with it yet.
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
THIS has been my go-to for the past couple years. Outstanding, easy to use, very heavy duty and cheap enough that I'm not upset if I misplace one or a friend holds on to mine for a few months (are you reading this Gentleman farmer!! LOL)

PH


The springy second hinge is nice in a flash.
My go-to is the waiter's double hinge from pulltap. $10.00 and they usually last quite a while. The first part that wears out for me is the blade.

Egad, they charge $30 for these springy second-hinges? If you're really nice, some wineries give these away. I got my most recent few from Maynard Keenan's Arizona Stronghold winery. Apparently, when you're a rock-star changing careers to wine-making, the band-swag and t-shirts mentality never goes away.
I open thousands of bottles of wine each year and have used the Code 38 Pro for the past 13 months. It is hands down the best cork puller I've ever used! The entire Code 38 range is spendy but if you open bottles of wine for a living there really is no comparison and it is worth every penny, IMHO.
quote:
Originally posted by IT:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I've broken at least one of every type mentioned here. But this one has never let me down. Can't beat it's elegant simplicity.


I was forced to use one of these on a bottle of vintage port a few years back (a 1983 Warres if I recall, and the last time I did not have my own corkscrew along), and it formed a neat hole straight through the cork without making it budge...Absolutely crap.

Strange. I've opened hundreds of bottles with mine and have never had that happen. I can only guess that perhaps there was some past leakage that glued the cork to the inside of the bottle?
quote:
Originally posted by Merengue:
quote:
Originally posted by mneeley490:
I've broken at least one of every type mentioned here. But this one has never let me down. Can't beat it's elegant simplicity.


Is this a double spindle mechanism? I am looking at a "bacchus" from monopol that i think is very similar.

Not sure what a "double spindle" is. I just call it a jack-screw design.
quote:
Originally posted by benchland:
I open thousands of bottles of wine each year and have used the Code 38 Pro for the past 13 months. It is hands down the best cork puller I've ever used! The entire Code 38 range is spendy but if you open bottles of wine for a living there really is no comparison and it is worth every penny, IMHO.

In fact. The Code 38 is utterly peerless.
I have a bunch of different corkscrews, but invariably I almost always end up using the standard waiter style with a teflon-coated screw.

The fish corkscrew actually works well, has a unique appearance, but is just a bit awkward to insert, so I don't bother with it.

The Corky extractor sounds good in theory, and I know that logically the cork will budge before the bottle explodes, but I can't help but feel nervous about increasing the pressure below the cork.

I haven't used my Screwpull lever in a while, even though it's really easy to use; it just takes up too much space.

Sometimes simple and reliable are really the best criteria for a tool.
quote:
Originally posted by SD-Wineaux:
quote:
Originally posted by KSC02:

quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:
Sometimes simple and reliable are really the best criteria for a tool.


Did I read that right? Isn't that a bit self-deprecating? Razz



Nonsense! At his age, "reliable" is high praise. Smile



At my age, "self-deprecating" is starting to sound like high praise.

I didn't even think I could still do that any more. Smile

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