It really shocked me...

just go to

costco

and read the warning..

Warning for California Residents Regarding Proposition 65:
Consuming foods or beverages that have been kept or served in this brand of leaded crystal exposes you to lead, a chemical known to the state of California to cause birth defects or reproductive harm.


Wow...what do you think? Confused
Original Post
I used to bite down on alot of lead split shot when i was fishing is So Cal. I'm pretty sure it didn't do me alot of good . I would think that any Cal resident that sails out beyond the 3 mile limit could safely drink about a metric ton of wine out of a Riedel leaded glass without croaking.
Standard Prop 65 warning. When we bought our house the builders made us sign a Prop 65 notification on the tap water.

I don't believe that anyone has proved that significant amounts of the lead in lead crystal glasses is leached out in the short term by wine. A study conducted at Columbia University showed that the lead content of fruit juice stored in a lead crystal bottle increased between 3X to 100X, but without knowing how much lead was actually released or in the liquid at the start it's difficult to judge the level of risk.

Although to be safe I no longer store anything in crystal for any significant length of time.

Now Riedel has a very harmful effect on the wallet. That they should warn you about.
Walt,

I agree with you, I cannot count how many times I also used the split shot fishing and the only way to close it was to bite down on it (o.k. grunhauser no jokes here)but it has not done any harm to me thus far, unless you count the lump on my left temporal lobe and the extra finger as harm.I don't think I would worry to much about the lead in a wine glass or decanter.As long as it does not sit for long periods of time.

Reidel does have the lead free glasses as I have some.But my granny drank from leaded glasses and she lived to 104.

Maybe one of the other glass makers had a great PR idea.
Rothko, be reassured, it's the eye-hand coordination. It's got nothing to do with the container and everything with the liquid contained.

Sienaslew, your granny must have been an atomic shelter by the time she was ninety.

Bella Donna, the language again. CTA?

- Computer Technology Associates
- Centro T├ęcnico Aeroespacial
- California Teachers Association
- Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU
- Chicago Transit Authority
- Colorado Translators Association (might need those...)
????
quote:
Originally posted by andyhugg:
It really shocked me...


and read the warning..

... known to the state of California to cause... reproductive harm.


Wow...what do you think? Confused


That's why I've stopped having sex with my Riedel decanters.

I'm ashamed to admit, however, that I'm still attracted to the graceful stem and gentle curve of the Vinum Burgundy glass, and am having difficulty severing that relationship.
quote:
Originally posted by Gigond Ass:
Be carefull. They're fragile Seaq. You might sever something else.


I believe that is directly linked to the reproductive harm that the warning was referencing. I'm sure the warning will be rewritten soon to cover all the possibilities.

Thank goodness for Proposition 65.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
Is there any evidence that a significant amount of lead will leach out when repeatedly exposed to wine?


The number of times the lead crystal glass is used doesn't matter; usually the beverage isn't in it for very long.

However, I understand the two factors that ARE important in the leeching of lead are the acidity of the beverage (wine being one of the worst in that respect) and the amount of contact time. Fortunately, most people don't leave wine in a decanter or glass for storage (though years ago I did do that regularly with a Port decanter for as long as a week or so) so it's usually not an issue.

In any event, over the course of a meal there isn't enough time for wine to release a harmful amount of lead from the crystal, if any. I've noticed, though, that some crystal companies (Ravenhurst is one) now advertise that they're lead-free, so clearly some people must have a raised anxiety level about this.
quote:
Originally posted by Seaquam:

The number of times the lead crystal glass is used doesn't matter; usually the beverage isn't in it for very long.

However, I understand the two factors that ARE important in the leeching of lead are the acidity of the beverage (wine being one of the worst in that respect) and the amount of contact time.


Sounds perfectly logical.


quote:

In any event, over the course of a meal there isn't enough time for wine to release a harmful amount of lead from the crystal, if any.


That also sounds logical to me, but how do you know this to be true? I'm not disputing it, but is there research to support that statement?
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:

That also sounds logical to me, but how do you know this to be true? I'm not disputing it, but is there research to support that statement?


Ah, ye of little faith... Big Grin

I believe there's quite a bit of research. I read a condensed report on this issue from Health Canada a couple of years ago that cited studies in its bibliography; I can't find it now, and I'm guessing that I might have thrown it away (not the kind of thing that one needs frequently). However, a quick google search shows a University of Waterloo study that discusses the effects of lead on humans; scroll down to "Lead Crystal" a short way down the page. I'm sure there's a number of similar sites that will provide more information.

I'm certainly no expert, but I don't recall ever reading a study or proposal that indicates absolutely NO deleterious effect from exposure to or ingestion of minute quantities of lead. It's really something that we-- wine drinkers who often use lead crystal-- ought to keep in mind as we're pouring. There's no harm in being practical about this.
Talk about a red herring...any leachable lead is entirely at the surface. Doing something simple like soaking new stems/decanters in warm diluted vinegar for an hour and thoroughly rinsing afterwards will take care of any (miniscule) potential problem. NOTE: do the above at your own risk, poor-quality lead crystal might have impurities which would cause the stem/decanter to become cloudy with exposure to warm dilute vinegar. I've done this with Riedel Vinum stems with no side effects.

I actually know a little about this -- back in the '80s I spent a few years in engineering/R&D at Corning Glass Works. They actually studied what happens to the glass if people spilled various things on Steuben crystal...

Mark
The wording on that warning that Costco has is a little odd: "...THIS brand of leaded crystal..."

What about other brands of leaded crystal?

Also that warning was for the Sommeliers glasses, which I belive are some of the only leaded crystal glasses that Riedel has now. Most of their glasses are lead free.

Riedel has to use lead in some of their high end glasses just to be able to get them as thin as they are, and keep them semi-durable.

The Tritans are interesting, they are a mix of Titanium and crystal. I'm going to order a couple just to see how strong they are. Someone told me you can drop them w/o them breaking.
It is my opinion, and only an opinion, that this issue, fueled by data compiled based on a very dangerous use of lead - high level exposure for a period of time in quantities in excess of what is considered safe (which is usually what is done in clinical studies attempting to determine the effects of a substance on humans) - to a real life, casual use, which is in no way even remotely similar - drinking wine from lead crystal. I don't know about you, but I will drink my wine out of whatever glasses I want. . .and I will eat butter . . . and I will eat fish . . . and I don't mind if my friends smoke a cigar around me . . . and I don't make my kids wear a helmet when riding their bike, either!
Ingesting lead is about the worst form of exposure.
However for adults, small doses of lead are quickly eliminated from the body.

You need a fairly high dose over an extended (weeks) period to develop lead poisoning. Industries where you have to worry about lead exposure inculde battery manufacture and repair, paint stripping, and vehicle exhaust repairs.

The potential dosage from a few glasses from a reidel a few times a week just isn't going to do harm to an adult, and in fact I doubt it would even be measurable.
I do recall reading something warning of storing fluids in lead crystal...I'm with Seaquam...just drinking from lead crystal should be no problem.

If I'm/we're wrong, and we're all pickled with lead...the upside may be we're all in good shape if there was a nuclear attack! Wink
Not only do crystal stems leach lead into wine, in drinking wine, you consume both SO2, small doses of CH3OH and larger doses of C2H5OH. The two last ones are especially dangerous. C2H5OH can, to the best of my knowledge, cause nausea, shakiness and vomiting, and in large doses or prolonged use, causes brain damage, and ultimately, among other things, could cause the cessation of breathing which tends to be terminal.

But I do use a helmet when biking.
quote:
Originally posted by Markus Randall:
Not only do crystal stems leach lead into wine, in drinking wine, you consume both SO2, small doses of CH3OH and larger doses of C2H5OH. The two last ones are especially dangerous. C2H5OH can, to the best of my knowledge, cause nausea, shakiness and vomiting, and in large doses or prolonged use, causes brain damage, and ultimately, among other things, could cause the cessation of breathing which tends to be terminal.

But I do use a helmet when biking.



I'm goint to start wearing a helmet while I drink wine.

You can never be too safe.
quote:
Originally posted by Markus Randall:
Not only do crystal stems leach lead into wine, in drinking wine, you consume both SO2, small doses of CH3OH and larger doses of C2H5OH. The two last ones are especially dangerous. C2H5OH can, to the best of my knowledge, cause nausea, shakiness and vomiting, and in large doses or prolonged use, causes brain damage, and ultimately, among other things, could cause the cessation of breathing which tends to be terminal.

But I do use a helmet when biking.



I'm going to start wearing a helmet while I drink wine.

You can never be too safe.

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