just got home from the grocery store where i picked up some steaks from the "Greenwise" section (Greenwise is the organic / green branding of our local grocery store). I usually don't bother with the "greenwise" stuff, but today they were on sale, so i said screw it to see if i could tell a difference.

When i got home I realized the package was marked "Greenwise Strip Steak Boneless", whereas the regular package usually says "NY Strip Steak Boneless". Is there a strip steak that isn't NY?? Did I buy an inferior cut of meat, or are they just saving label space??

I don't really care either way, I'm just curious if I bought a different cut of meat because I'm not familiar with it.

tia
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by thirsty man:
Does it matter? We all know a bone-in ribeye is a better steak anyway......

Personally (aside from a Flannery rib cap roast) the bone-in rib eye is my favorite as well. And number 2 is the boneless ribeye. But many different cuts have their purposes. Who would argue a well marinated flank or skirt steak? I think both the loin (strip) and tenderloin (filet mignon) make great (very different, but both great) steaks as well.
New York Strip, KC Strip, Sirloin Strip Steak, Bone-In or Bone-out, they are all the same thing...a steak fabricated from the striploin subprimal from the whole short loin. This is the "bigger" side of a T-Bone or Porterhouse Steak opposite the Tenderloin.

A well marbled, dry-aged strip steak is only topped by a rib cap, or possibly a Flannery hanger steak.
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
A well marbled, dry-aged strip steak is only topped by a rib cap, or possibly a Flannery hanger steak.


Bill-

This is thread drift, but how do you cook your hanger steak from Bryan? I haven't had one yet and saw a lot of positive comments (on eBob, before it went private Roll Eyes). Marinate? Not? Thanks in advance.
For my money, nothing comes close to topping a good cut of NY Strip when it comes to steak. Don't get me wrong, I'd never pass up a good Ribeye or Filet, but Strips likely hold all of my top 3 all-time steak experiences. Some ribeyes just have too much marbling for my tastes, though I know that is the reason why several prefer it.

Costco out in AZ has been selling the Prime Strips for well over a year now, and let's just say that my wife and I enjoy a few of those at least 2 to 4 times a month Big Grin
2 4 ounce hanger steaks
1 Tbsp Extra virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 Tbsp tomato paste
1 Tbsp water
1/4 tsp salt
Fresh ground black pepper
1 tsp Dijon mustard
Spray olive oil
2 Tbsp water

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Place a large skillet in the oven.

Place the hanger steaks in a bowl with the olive oil, red wine vinegar, balsamic vinegar, tomato paste, water, salt, pepper and Dijon mustard. Toss the steaks well to thoroughly coat with the sauce.

When the pan is hot add the hanger steaks Reserve whatever marinade doesn’t cling to the steaks.

Cook for about 5 minutes and turn. Place the rest of the sauce on top of the steaks. Cook for another 5 minutes for medium rare.

Remove the pan from the oven and place the steaks on a cutting board. Let them rest for a few minutes. While they are resting add the water to the pan 1 tablespoon at a time whisking to create a sauce. Use more water if needed but don’t make the sauce too thin.

Slice the steaks and place it on a plate and top each with half of the sauce.

Serve with Roasted Potatoes Yam Home Fries, and Parmesan Squash
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
All this talk made me go out and buy prime NY strips. Now I'll have to shovel a path to the grill.


Big Grin

I'm on a serious steak binge this week. I need to stop.

Monday afternoon: burger
Monday night: NY strips
Wednesday night: burger
Thursday afternoon: sliced whole tenderloin

but i really wanna make a hanger steak!

quote:
Originally posted by AZwineRyan:

Costco out in AZ has been selling the Prime Strips for well over a year now


My local Costco sells prime top sirloin and ribeyes. I prefer the top sirloin most of the time. I don't care for strip steaks all that much, but if they had prime, I'd sure give them a shot.
quote:
Originally posted by thelostverse:
quote:
Originally posted by AZwineRyan:

Costco out in AZ has been selling the Prime Strips for well over a year now


My local Costco sells prime top sirloin and ribeyes. I prefer the top sirloin most of the time. I don't care for strip steaks all that much, but if they had prime, I'd sure give them a shot.


A few of the local Costcos out here pretty regularly stock prime Strip, Sirloin, and Ribeye...I occasionally see prime Filets aswell, but not as often.
quote:
Originally posted by BRR:
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
A well marbled, dry-aged strip steak is only topped by a rib cap, or possibly a Flannery hanger steak.


Bill-

This is thread drift, but how do you cook your hanger steak from Bryan? I haven't had one yet and saw a lot of positive comments (on eBob, before it went private Roll Eyes). Marinate? Not? Thanks in advance.


The de facto recipe for me and most of the crew in these parts, as well as on wineberserkers is as follows:

Hanger Steak
1/4 Cup Dark Korean Soy Sauce (Senpio Brand is what I use)
1/4 Cup Freshly Squeezed Lime Juice
1/4 Cup EVOO
Sriracha Hot Sauce to Taste
Finely Ground Telicherry Pepper

Mix marinade in a gallon ZipLoc bag and toss in the steak. Remove as much air from bag as possible and marinate for 1 1/2 to 2 hours at room temperature. Take steak out of marinade and dry off as best possible with paper towels. Give the steak a quick brushing of EVOO or spray Pam.

Get your grilling device of choice up to it full setting. Sear the steak on side one for a couple of minutes, rotate ninety degrees and cook for two minutes more, flip and cook for two minutes then rotate 90 degrees and finish in two more minutes.

Timing is of course +/- depending on your rig and desired level of doneness, but I always shoot for the rare side of mediium-rare. Eight minutes total on a Weber Kettle using Mesquite Hardwood Charcoal is what works for me.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I don't understand hanger steak, other than for price. It's tougher and less tasty than skirt steak.


I think it all depends on the purveyor and the source of said critter. Your comment could be reflective of any cut if you are not sourcing from a high end establishment.
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Tex Landreth:
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
I don't understand hanger steak, other than for price. It's tougher and less tasty than skirt steak.


I think it all depends on the purveyor and the source of said critter. Your comment could be reflective of any cut if you are not sourcing from a high end establishment.


Hanger can be so skinny that folks often end up cutting it with the grain. I've NEVER had tough hanger steak when properly sliced across the grain.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
Heard on Thursday night at our local grocery store:

"I don't like New York steak, it's too tough and no flavor"


No flavor from a New York? Lol, right...that's why I prefer NY Strips - I think it's by far the juiciest cut around. I always have some rolls around for after I'm done eating my Strip at home because I just love soaking up that steak juice on my plate! Yum Big Grin

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