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quote:
Originally posted by Dr Gray:
Would this be ok for a year or two?


Yes it would be fine. while your storage conditions are not the best what maters most is consistency, if you can keep you bottles year round at 72 and not have fluctuations you will be ok for a few years. The problem is when the wine is going from 65 in the winter to 75+ in the summer that is bad on your wine.
I've had a passive cellar (temps mostly in the 60s for 10 months of the year, low 70s during the summer with humidity at 50-60%) for the past five to six years now, and so far, none of my '97 Brunellos or Barolos have turned to balsamic vinegar. In fact, they are both drinking beautifully. Unless you are saving your first growths for your newborn, I would say that your wines should be ok. I would worry more about exposture to light, low humidity, and high temperatures.
quote:
Originally posted by DoubleD:
I've had a passive cellar (temps mostly in the 60s for 10 months of the year, low 70s during the summer with humidity at 50-60%) for the past five to six years now, and so far, none of my '97 Brunellos or Barolos have turned to balsamic vinegar. In fact, they are both drinking beautifully. Unless you are saving your first growths for your newborn, I would say that your wines should be ok. I would worry more about exposture to light, low humidity, and high temperatures.
Too warm.
Big reds are a hell of a lot more resilient than people give them credit for. Sure, if you are cellaring delicate Pinot for the long term, the temperatures you mentioned are not great, but for most red wines it would not be a problem.

The biggest enemy to wine ageing is not seasonal variation of say 65 to 75 over the course of the year, it actually daily fluctuation. The greater the daily fluctuation, the faster with the wine will age. This is not fantasy. It is absolutely proven fact.

I have regularly left wine in my racks at home for a couple years, and these suffer much more daily fluctuation than is good for them, and the wine in the vast majority of cases is fine when it has eventually opened. If youa wine that will age for let's say 10 years under perfect storage conditions, it should certainly last three under very poor conditions, and in a cabinet, even at a constant 75°, conservatively should still be good for six years.

I have drunk thousands of bottles of wine that have come out of passive cellars that are less than than perfect storage conditions, and most of them had been just fine.

If you think about it, these wine cabinets are a fairly new addition to the wine lovers arsenal, and for many decades people have been drinking wine that have not been stored in air-conditioned comfort.

Also, think about shops that are air-conditioned, were the wine can sit on the shelf for extended periods of time. Most of the time those wines are fine too. They may be a little advanced, but that in most cases would be the worst of it.

Many of us can be a little precious with our babies, they are a lot tougher than we think.
Hi Yaron,

The only reason that wine has to be stored on its side is to stop the cork drying out - well that's the conventional wisdom.

Unless the cork is really crappy, it should not dry out in a short period of time. It takes a long time for that to happen. Also, your chances of getting a corked wine is far greater than your chance of getting a cork drying out.

Many people seem to be concerned about keeping their wine perfectly, yet they don't seem to be all that concerned about the most likely cause of the problem, the damage done to the seal of the wine by the vagaries of cork - and many of these people still think corks are the only answer.
quote:
Originally posted by mseanmc:
Is there any detrimental effects from storing whites in conditions that may be too cold (40 - 50 degrees?)


naw that should be fine

you could store reds liek that too but you'd probably retard their "aging".

it'd be a problem if you start storing below freezing, and some of these wine fridges are inconsistent where the bottom of the fridge is like 10 degrees colder then the top of the fridge.

Freezing might cause the cork to expand unnaturally and when you bring it out to a higher temp to store (like moving from bottom of the fridge to top of the fridge), might cause it to shrink more t hen it should.
quote:
Originally posted by TORB:
Big reds are a hell of a lot more resilient than people give them credit for. Sure, if you are cellaring delicate Pinot for the long term, the temperatures you mentioned are not great, but for most red wines it would not be a problem.

The biggest enemy to wine ageing is not seasonal variation of say 65 to 75 over the course of the year, it actually daily fluctuation. The greater the daily fluctuation, the faster with the wine will age. This is not fantasy. It is absolutely proven fact.

I have regularly left wine in my racks at home for a couple years, and these suffer much more daily fluctuation than is good for them, and the wine in the vast majority of cases is fine when it has eventually opened. If youa wine that will age for let's say 10 years under perfect storage conditions, it should certainly last three under very poor conditions, and in a cabinet, even at a constant 75°, conservatively should still be good for six years.

I have drunk thousands of bottles of wine that have come out of passive cellars that are less than than perfect storage conditions, and most of them had been just fine.

If you think about it, these wine cabinets are a fairly new addition to the wine lovers arsenal, and for many decades people have been drinking wine that have not been stored in air-conditioned comfort.

Also, think about shops that are air-conditioned, were the wine can sit on the shelf for extended periods of time. Most of the time those wines are fine too. They may be a little advanced, but that in most cases would be the worst of it.

Many of us can be a little precious with our babies, they are a lot tougher than we think.


I agree. the biggest enemy is not the absolute temperature as much as the varience.
quote:
Originally posted by TORB:
Big reds are a hell of a lot more resilient than people give them credit for. ...They may be a little advanced, but that in most cases would be the worst of it.
Many of us can be a little precious with our babies, they are a lot tougher than we think.

Your post above is well put TORB, and I completely agree.

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