How about adding or replying to the 2 (actually 3 ) other threads you started here on the same subject - including the one where a wine maker member responded to you and took the time to give you advice and his email address. Your reality show job hunt doesn't require 3 threads.

Here and Here?

He even replied to your strange twin HERE

You're getting a little weird now

Maybe a job in fast food service is more suitable for you at this point. Roll Eyes

Good luck though - whatever you name is.
Why are you wasting time by posting your desires to work at a winery? Get on the horn and start making some calls or, better yet, take a trip to California and get aggressive by arranging appointments with the decision makers at some wineries. Get some gumption and quit talking.

Somehow I get the feeling that you are just here to yank chains and that you are not serious about this. But, in the event that you are serious, do you think that winery work is glorious? From everything that I read about winery work I have concluded that it is very hard work and that the rewards do not always equate to the effort expended. I guess I can understand your desire to work at winery if your end goal is to someday be a winemaker or vineyard owner but if this is not your goal, why chose this line of work? If you really love wine and want to work in the field why don’t you contact some distributors for sales work? Well, maybe that is not such a good idea since your sales skills appear to be rather weak.
I think Misha is very sincere. He's contacted me off line, rewrote his resume and letter to be more 'hard work' focused, and I believe he's on his way shortly to the Bay Area to start knocking on doors.

I've told him his best bet is to show up and start asking for work.

This is really, really hard. I put it this way to people. Every year Jerry Anderson had 10-12 people ask him if they could help in the winery. In 2005 he let me work for him. At that point I had been managing vineyard and making home wine for 5 years, and I was making wine commercially with my own federal permits.

So, I had 5 + years of experience, My own winery and my own vineyard management company, and that was the requirement to beat out 100+ other people to get a NON PAID job. It's tough going.
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
I think Misha is very sincere. He's contacted me off line, rewrote his resume and letter to be more 'hard work' focused, and I believe he's on his way shortly to the Bay Area to start knocking on doors.

I've told him his best bet is to show up and start asking for work.

This is really, really hard. I put it this way to people. Every year Jerry Anderson had 10-12 people ask him if they could help in the winery. In 2005 he let me work for him. At that point I had been managing vineyard and making home wine for 5 years, and I was making wine commercially with my own federal permits.

So, I had 5 + years of experience, My own winery and my own vineyard management company, and that was the requirement to beat out 100+ other people to get a NON PAID job. It's tough going.


that is insane! but the fact is with that experience you did indeed get the non paid job =P

I don't think I could ever go through the pain and trouble for a non paid job.
Good luck! I have been offered jobs to be a wine rep for local wine companys in mpls, but you start at the bottom with the worst contacts for retail and restaurants. I'ts real dog eat dog. A friend of mine worked at Stag's Leap cellars in the early eighties with WW, and went on to work at other prominent wineries but It sounds hard.
When I worked at Napa Valley Grille in Mpls eight years ago I was in charge of a $140,000 wine inventory. All california wines of course, but we had over 500 selections on the list and I spent alot of time with the wine reps we used from about 12 different distributors. I got to know them well and still keep in touch with some now, but it's still a tough go unless you are established. Look for an entry level job somewhere to start. Razz

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