I spotted Comet PAN-STARRS tonight from my rooftop. It's at its brightest tonight in terms of apparent magnitude, but also at its closest to the Sun, making it hard to see.

It's supposed to be moving northward and pulling away from the Sun, so it should be easier to spot in the Northern Hemisphere in the coming weeks. (I needed binoculars at first)
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
It was excellent Tuesday. If you can get any type of telescope out there--do so. I used my more portable 80mm refractor. At the least binoculars are a must. The best for all around astronomy use are 7x50s.


Will it still be visible tonight at roughly the same distances you mentioned previously?
quote:
Originally posted by snipes:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
It was excellent Tuesday. If you can get any type of telescope out there--do so. I used my more portable 80mm refractor. At the least binoculars are a must. The best for all around astronomy use are 7x50s.


Will it still be visible tonight at roughly the same distances you mentioned previously?


The moon will be well above it--about 15% (which you can guessimate by outstretching your hand with "devil's finger" and closing one eye.) Also the moon moves about 15% a day, so it will no longer be a guide. Best bet is to be in a fairly dark suburban sky. Look straight west about 20 degrees up and scan with binoculars. The darker the location the better and if you're out where it's really dark you may spot it with the naked eye. Kind of looks like a medium bright star with a 2 to 4 degree tail pointing up. For "size" reference the moon is 1/2 a degree in size.

The good news a Comet Ison is still expected to be a spectacular naked eye comet by December.
quote:
Originally posted by VinT:
A good week for stargazing, with both supermoon and Perseids vying for attention.

Actually it was a bad week. A slightly larger moon that only a hardcore astronomy buff would notice and to make matters worse a not worth seeing meteor shower due to the brightness of that moon.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Actually it was a bad week. A slightly larger moon that only a hardcore astronomy buff would notice

I love it when you're crusty just for the sake of being crusty. Razz

I'm far from a 'hardcore astronomy buff', but it sure looked larger to me. <This photo> shows the relative difference in the moon's apparent size when it is 50,000 km closer to earth.
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
No wonder I couldn't see it... Frown

I wonder what was in the payload.

PH

My brother-in-law works for Orbital Sciences. He said the payload was comprised of food, clothing, equipment, experiments, etc. It was the biggest resupply payload they had attempted, to date.
Astronomy alert.

In the western sky, shortly after sunset, 45 degrees up will be Jupiter and Venus, less than one third of a degree a part. (For reference the moon is 1/2 a degree across.) Though Jupiter is the second brightest object in the sky Venus way outshines it. This close approach is called a conjunction.

This is very easy to see and well worth a look.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
Best Perseid meteor shower in years due to moon being new dark. Best after midnight Wed. going into Thurs. Sit comfortably in a lounge chair, face south and keep your eyes open.


I will remember a few nights straight of the Geminids showers while sailing thousands of miles from land till the day I die. Probably more than 100 an hour in different colours lighting up the sky. It was so clear you could almost read by the starlight. One of those few times you can use the word awesome in its correct usage.
Out in the desert saw about 40 and hour (this includes many fast and faint object) including two of the most unique meteors I've ever seen. The first, though short, was bright and as it traveled a short distance it made a motion like a thrown knuckle ball. I've seen meteors break up but not exhibit this behavior.

The other one I actually heard as it streaked across the sky. For decades it has been said that you can't hear meteors and there's an obvious problem to saying you can. Meteors tend to flare around 60 miles up. So while you see them instantly (with light traveling 186,000 miles in a second) sound travels, in dry air, around 750 MPH. So the sound should come around 5 minutes after seeing the streak.

So here's the new thinking: Meteors apparently give off VLF sound waves, below 30 kHz. But there's still one problem, the waves, which also travel at the speed of light, need something to transduce. And apparently it can be the metal of a tent pole, or some fine tree needles, or even one's metal glasses. So while the sound appeared to come from the sky, but was most likely down to earth right near me. As often described it did sound like bacon sizzling. Oh yeah, bacon!
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
This is nowhere near a hobby of mine, but I'm surprised there was no mention of last night's eclipse and "blood moon". Possible it was only visible in the Midwest?

I tried to see it last night, but the moon was mostly obscured by clouds. It was pretty cool from the small glimpse I got.
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
This is nowhere near a hobby of mine, but I'm surprised there was no mention of last night's eclipse and "blood moon". Possible it was only visible in the Midwest?

It was visible throughout the US, barring clouds of course. In the west, unless you had a clear view to the horizon it was just past total as it rose.
quote:
Originally posted by billhike:
I didn't have much interest, but it was too easily visible from my balcony, so I partook. Glad I did.

Same here. Didn't put much thought into it, but saw that I was sitting on the couch while it was supposed to be visible, so went out to the balcony and saw it. Pretty neat.
quote:
Originally posted by Rothko:
I missed it, here.

However, the super high tide here is wild. I don't know if I've ever seen the water so high.


Tides have been high in Key West for the last couple weeks and have gotten crazy high. Saw some insane pictures from Miami beach as well

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×