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quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
The ISS is often visible.


Not so much here, at least for us Easterners. The combination of approach angle, lack of clouds and darkness was a fairly rare confluence here.

PH

Great you made the effort. A lot of people don't realize there is a bunch you can see from city or other not ideal locations.
@g-man posted:

Anybody catch of glimpse of comet atlas before it burned?  It gave off a luminescent green tail.

a second comet SWAN was passing by but I haven't yet been able to catch  it

I'm a little confused about what you're reporting. Comet Atlas, at its brightest, was mag 7 which is beyond naked eye visibility. Did you view it through binoculars? If so, very impressed. Also it didn't burn (this never happens to a comet), it broke up. Swan is currently too low for most to see.

Alright smart ass.  When you look up do you see any stars?  You do?  Then clearly the star or the planet is bright enough for you to see through the telescope.

Im not taking out there taking time lapse photos of distant galaxies.

 

You can make out the major planets like venus, mars and jupiter quite well.  Ditto bright comets

Go back to guessing Andremily's blind

Bright comets broseph?  I’m no astronomer, but don’t the planets you list get there brightness from the sun’s light at just the right time and angle for people to see with the naked eye.  So for comets,traveling at a non-elliptical path, would have to cross the sun’s rays and at a distance to earth so we can see it with the naked eye.  🤔🤔

@doubled posted:

Bright comets broseph?  I’m no astronomer, but don’t the planets you list get there brightness from the sun’s light at just the right time and angle for people to see with the naked eye.  So for comets,traveling at a non-elliptical path, would have to cross the sun’s rays and at a distance to earth so we can see it with the naked eye.  🤔🤔

Lol mr astronomer.  You said how can i see various objects in the sky w my telescope.  

Not every one has super sight like you mr super nose blind guesser

Thank you. I was never into astrophotography, I'm really into visual observing and an SCT also isn't the best for deep sky photography. This photo was taken not through the telescope, just a camera. And in those days it was of course film and the favorite for film was the Olympus OM-1. You could get a used one pretty cheap. So just a 250mm on a tripod. You can see from the star trailing that it was about 5 minutes.

Your scope has is very fast for it's objective diameter. The focal length my 10in is 2,500mm where you're I think around 1,200. With today's digital equipment there's a lot you could. However the preferred imaging set up these days is either a DLSR or a CCD camera (for the hardcore) attached to an 80mm to 120mm refractor. 

I hope you can get to true dark sky locations (at the least with the Milky Way in clear view), your size telescope calls for it.

This is my best shot through my Meade. It pales to what can be done easily today. It's M31, the Orion Nebula, which I hope you've seen in your scope by now.

 

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