Great view tonight of Saturn, Mars, and Jupiter fanning out from the nearly full moon. Antares and Spica playing supporting roles.
If you have decent lenses, you can clearly see 3 or 4 moons of Jupiter.
From the suburbs of NJ, it was okay. The moon was definitely brighter. I'm sure if I were on tropical island, the supermoon would have been more impressive.
Definitely bigger the closer it is to the horizon. Tonight is supposed to be the closest the moon will come to us, but we have clouds/rain forecast.

PH
To my surprise, the skies cleared in Seattle, so the moon was shining over our deck. I wish I could report this as a life changing event, but I guess the stars were not aligned.
East Coasters. Late notice, but a very visible flyby by the International Space Station begins at 5:34 tonight. Coming from the South West.

PH
Pretty cool to see something traveling 17,000 miles an hour that's 250+ miles above us flying by. With people in it. Pretty cool.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
Pretty cool to see something traveling 17,000 miles an hour that's 250+ miles above us flying by. With people in it. Pretty cool.

PH


your speed is wrong

dont you know the earth is flat?

17k miles per hour would have meant the space station would have went by too fast for you to see.
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
The ISS is often visible.


Not so much here, at least for us Easterners. The combination of approach angle, lack of clouds and darkness was a fairly rare confluence here.

PH
quote:
Originally posted by PurpleHaze:
quote:
Originally posted by The Old Man:
The ISS is often visible.


Not so much here, at least for us Easterners. The combination of approach angle, lack of clouds and darkness was a fairly rare confluence here.

PH

Great you made the effort. A lot of people don't realize there is a bunch you can see from city or other not ideal locations.
Less and less as light pollution scrubs the stars from our skies.

And, no effort at all. I grabbed my wineglass opened the garage door, looked to the SW and watched for 5 minutes. It was a little chilly... Wink

PH

The first launch of NASA Astronauts from US soil in almost 10 years is coming up next Wednesday, weather permitting.  Godspeed gentlemen.

I think that politicizing this flight for any reason is stupid.  Let's wish them a safe journey and return home.

PH

Anybody catch of glimpse of comet atlas before it burned?  It gave off a luminescent green tail.

a second comet SWAN was passing by but I haven't yet been able to catch  it

@g-man posted:

Anybody catch of glimpse of comet atlas before it burned?  It gave off a luminescent green tail.

a second comet SWAN was passing by but I haven't yet been able to catch  it

I'm a little confused about what you're reporting. Comet Atlas, at its brightest, was mag 7 which is beyond naked eye visibility. Did you view it through binoculars? If so, very impressed. Also it didn't burn (this never happens to a comet), it broke up. Swan is currently too low for most to see.

@g-man posted:

matter of fact, i have a 10" newtonian telescope.  One of my few splurge being stranded at home purchases.

Wow, it's a reflector? You must have a huge German equatorial mount, unless it's a dobsonian. I have a 10in Meade SCT.

Last edited by The Old Man

I know you live in New York, do you have someplace dark you can take it to? I'm fortunate to have the Anza-Borrego Desert less than 2 hours from here. Not as dark as it used to be, but it's almost always comfortable at night, never need a dew shield (which a reflector never needs) and there are no mosquitoes or other insects.

Last edited by The Old Man

I was thinking the same — about being able to see through the light pollution in the middle of Long Island.  🤔

Last edited by doubled

Alright smart ass.  When you look up do you see any stars?  You do?  Then clearly the star or the planet is bright enough for you to see through the telescope.

Im not taking out there taking time lapse photos of distant galaxies.

 

You can make out the major planets like venus, mars and jupiter quite well.  Ditto bright comets

Go back to guessing Andremily's blind

Bright comets broseph?  I’m no astronomer, but don’t the planets you list get there brightness from the sun’s light at just the right time and angle for people to see with the naked eye.  So for comets,traveling at a non-elliptical path, would have to cross the sun’s rays and at a distance to earth so we can see it with the naked eye.  🤔🤔

@doubled posted:

Bright comets broseph?  I’m no astronomer, but don’t the planets you list get there brightness from the sun’s light at just the right time and angle for people to see with the naked eye.  So for comets,traveling at a non-elliptical path, would have to cross the sun’s rays and at a distance to earth so we can see it with the naked eye.  🤔🤔

Lol mr astronomer.  You said how can i see various objects in the sky w my telescope.  

Not every one has super sight like you mr super nose blind guesser

@doubled posted:

I like busting your chops because you make fun of my naps in the middle of an offline.

my next comment woulda been you couldn't stay awake!

@The Old Man posted:

Comet Hale-Bopp 1997 in Anza-Borrego Desert State Park.

which attachment to your telescope to grab those pics and which camera?

absolutely beautiful

Last edited by g-man

Thank you. I was never into astrophotography, I'm really into visual observing and an SCT also isn't the best for deep sky photography. This photo was taken not through the telescope, just a camera. And in those days it was of course film and the favorite for film was the Olympus OM-1. You could get a used one pretty cheap. So just a 250mm on a tripod. You can see from the star trailing that it was about 5 minutes.

Your scope has is very fast for it's objective diameter. The focal length my 10in is 2,500mm where you're I think around 1,200. With today's digital equipment there's a lot you could. However the preferred imaging set up these days is either a DLSR or a CCD camera (for the hardcore) attached to an 80mm to 120mm refractor. 

I hope you can get to true dark sky locations (at the least with the Milky Way in clear view), your size telescope calls for it.

This is my best shot through my Meade. It pales to what can be done easily today. It's M31, the Orion Nebula, which I hope you've seen in your scope by now.

 

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