quote:
Originally posted by khmark7:
Since there are several people here who really know their spices I would really appreciate any suggestions on what spices people enjoy on their steak. Thanks!


I actually do not do too much with steak. On nicer cuts, I usually just use salt and pepper. Depending on how I cook it, I usually like to do something like a pan sauce or an herb butter to accompany it. In my opinion, cheaper cuts like flank do better with spices, marinades, etc.

I do have a coffee-rub recipe that I picked up somewhere that is awesome on rib-eye. I will have to dig it up and post later though.
I use a ton of spices in my cooking, with over 50 in the drawer right now. But to me, steak needs little enhancement, and good steak is, IMHO, ruined by too much fiddling. I save the spices for lesser cuts, and keep the good cuts plain and simple.

I just rub the meat with olive oil, sprinkle it with a bit of kosher or sea salt (contrary to urban legend, that doesn't dry out the meat), and a lot of fresh, coarsely ground black pepper (I prefer Talamancha from www.pepper-passion.com). Grill quickly over a very hot fire to sear and char the outside while keeping the meat medium rare.
quote:
On nicer cuts, I usually just use salt and pepper.


Yep. Sea Salt/Kosher Salt and fresh ground pepper. Spicing up Porterhouse or other good cut too much really takes a way from the point of a good steak.

I'll use marinades for London Broil, Skirt Steak and a few others.
I'm with the rest here - I stick with salt and pepper for my steaks. Most times I make a sauce to go with it (Red Wine and Herb butter compound, Mustard Port Sauce, or Peppercorn Demiglace).

I save most of the spices for braising, stewing or slow roasting, but obviously don't use grilling cuts with these methods.
Great lookers, don't know how well they work, but probably good enough for the table.

If you want the best pepper mill around, check this site:

http://www.unicornmills.com/

In particular, look at the Magnum Plus. It's simply the best mill available -- but it ain't too pretty. It will grind a teaspoon of coarse pepper in about 10 twists, and can produce anything from cracked pepper to fine powder, all with the twist of the adjustment knob. And it holds about a cup of peppercorns. Top choice in Cook's.

I've had one for several years (10?). The top once broke and they sent me a replacement part in a couple of days, no charge.

Wouldn't be without it!
quote:
Stubb's Marinade, then grill.

Sage compond butter to finish a grilled steak that was seasoned lightley with Toney Creole seasoning.Pair with a Syrah!


How does this work? Do you melt the butter on the stove and pour over the finished steak?? Sorry to sound stupid, but I've never put butter on a steak before, only pancakes.
kh, here's the recipe and technique that I use for my butter compound. I'm not sure if it's the same as Lorrie's, but most compound butters that I've seen in recipes end up with blending the ingredients with the butter and then shaping it into a log with cling rap or parchment and refrigerating for a bit. This makes for a great presentation by slicing a bit off the end of the log and topping the steak with the small discs of butter.

Red Wine and Herb Butter
2 cups red wine
6 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons dried oregano
2 tablespoons dried basil
1 pound butter, at room temperature
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves

Combine red wine, garlic, oregano, and basil in a medium saucepan. Reduce over high heat until wine is just about evaporated. Add reduced wine mixture to butter. Add Worcestershire sauce and parsley and mix until well combined. Refrigerate butter mixture for 5 minutes to harden slightly. After butter mixture has hardened slightly, spread mixture over waxed paper and roll into a log. Chill. After butter sets in log, cut into 1-inch thick medallions to top steak.
I believe for the grill, less is better to let the quality of the meat shine. Assuming you start off with a good quality cut of beef.
We use an Hawaiian seasoning called Ono. It is sea salt, pepper and a little ginger
or we use the Montreal Steak Seasoning. Let the smoke of the grill provide the additional seasoning.
I dislike "cowboy seasoning" or additions of any chili, cumin, comino or spicy seasonings to the steak that is going to be grilled. I think these should be reserved to lesser cuts of meat because it disguises the beef.

I've had good sauces and butter compounds, it just not something we feel we need to add when we grill at home.
On prime, dry-aged steaks, I sprinkle with sea salt and pepper after rubbing with al little evoo.

With good quality, choice steaks, I may use some Montreal Steak Seasoning or make my own spice rub.

I just about never grill filet mignon. I prize it for its texture and prefer to pan sear it and create a sauce by deglazing.
I use cold unsalted butter, sea salt , black pepper and torn sage leaves about 7-10 depending on size. I cut the cold butter into pats and add all the ingredients in a food proccessor,pulse until the mixture becomes a ball. shape into a log in the butter liner or waxed waper, then foil and put in the freezer for about 10 minutes , then refridgerate. I like to make rosemary compound butter as well. Very simple and so good over a variety of dishes.
quote:
Originally posted by conscious:
kh, here's the recipe and technique that I use for my butter compound. I'm not sure if it's the same as Lorrie's, but most compound butters that I've seen in recipes end up with blending the ingredients with the butter and then shaping it into a log with cling rap or parchment and refrigerating for a bit. This makes for a great presentation by slicing a bit off the end of the log and topping the steak with the small discs of butter.

Red Wine and Herb Butter
2 cups red wine
6 cloves garlic
2 tablespoons dried oregano
2 tablespoons dried basil
1 pound butter, at room temperature
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves

Combine red wine, garlic, oregano, and basil in a medium saucepan. Reduce over high heat until wine is just about evaporated. Add reduced wine mixture to butter. Add Worcestershire sauce and parsley and mix until well combined. Refrigerate butter mixture for 5 minutes to harden slightly. After butter mixture has hardened slightly, spread mixture over waxed paper and roll into a log. Chill. After butter sets in log, cut into 1-inch thick medallions to top steak.
Coarse Kosher Salt & fresh cracked Pepper go on as soon as I remove the meat from the fridge. While the meat comes to room temperature, I cut a few sprigs of fresh Rosemary, throw them in a bowl with some Olive Oil. The steaks go on the grill and the Rosemary goes on top. After you turn the steak, keep the Rosemary on the topside.
quote:
Originally posted by LouBriccant!:
Coarse Kosher Salt & fresh cracked Pepper go on as soon as I remove the meat from the fridge. While the meat comes to room temperature, I cut a few sprigs of fresh Rosemary, throw them in a bowl with some Olive Oil. The steaks go on the grill and the Rosemary goes on top. After you turn the steak, keep the Rosemary on the topside.


I like this method. Rosemary and Cabs play together nicely.

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