I'm relatively new to the wine scene, and I regularly drink (two, sometimes three) glasses of red wine almost every day. For the past six months or so, I have developed skin rashes on my lower neck and upper chest. I attribute this to my wine drinking and wonder if anyone else on this list has experienced a similar effect. Thanks for your attention
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by ohtheHumanity:
(sulfites are not present in every wine. check the back of the label to make sure. its common in many "new world" wines.)


Sulphites are present in every wine to some extent. They are added to most wines as a preservative, but in fairly small quantities. As a general rule red wine contains significantly less sulphites than white wine since the tannins act as a preservative. You're more likely to get an allergic reaction to sulphites from eating dried fruit than drinking wine.
quote:
Originally posted by Dave Tong:
quote:
Originally posted by ohtheHumanity:
(sulfites are not present in every wine. check the back of the label to make sure. its common in many "new world" wines.)


Sulphites are present in every wine to some extent. They are added to most wines as a preservative, but in fairly small quantities. As a general rule red wine contains significantly less sulphites than white wine since the tannins act as a preservative. You're more likely to get an allergic reaction to sulphites from eating dried fruit than drinking wine.


Correct. The rash is more likely from the alcohol.
Rosacea is actually an enigmatic condition. It's response to Erythromycin leads many researchers to believe it is infectious/bacterial in origin. It is not caused by alcohol consumption. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rosacea/DS00308
Some ethnicities do infact react to alcohol with swelling/puffiness and redness in localized areas. But, allergic reactions are typically mainfested systemically - all over, not localized as the original poster describes. I would just see a doctor. This may be a vital parte of their medical history and the precaution agains Sulfa drugs is warranted.

That is my opinon, but I'm just a doctor.
azprwb:

How dare you inject intelligent scientific information into a thread based upon rumor and speculation?

My guess: Chances are it's a reaction to something in the laundry detergent or softener. The neck is rubbed by the collar of the garment all day long, while the clothing tends to be flat against the torso.

Try a hypo-allergenic detergent, but do not eschew the wine.

Going to a dermatologist or allergist is not irrational. (Dermatology is a great specialty. There are hundreds of conditions and two or three creams)
I have at least 2 friends that have experienced the same from red wine. And one friend who is allergic to white.

The gals that are allergic to red attriibute it to the tannins or something in the coloring(that's not a medical diagnosis, of course). Oddly, they are also allergic to strawberry daqueries (sp?) and some other preserved red fruit products.

The gal that is allergic to white, attributes it to sulfites.
quote:
Originally posted by irwin:
azprwb:

How dare you inject intelligent scientific information into a thread based upon rumor and speculation?

My guess: Chances are it's a reaction to something in the laundry detergent or softener. The neck is rubbed by the collar of the garment all day long, while the clothing tends to be flat against the torso.

Try a hypo-allergenic detergent, but do not eschew the wine.

Going to a dermatologist or allergist is not irrational. (Dermatology is a great specialty. There are hundreds of conditions and two or three creams)


Thanks azprwb and Irwin for your "professional" diagnoses and recommendations. I had done all of these things before posting here: i.e. gone to my dermatologist (who, btw, agreed with azprwb: he did not think it was an allergy caused by wine because "allergic reactions are typically manifested systemically - all over, not localized").
I had also already done what Irwin prescribes: changed all our detergents, my body soaps, shampoos, etc, to hypo-allergenic products, on the advice of my dermatologist.
Nevertheless, through the process of elimination, I'm left with the conclusion that wine must be at fault in this case, because its regular consumption is the only addition I've made to my habits in the last 7 or 8 months.
As Irwin pointed out, the science of dermatology has its limitations. (As someone once said about dermatologists: "They can't cure you, but then again they can't kill you.")
So this is the reason I decided to post here: if indeed my allergy was caused by wine consumption I thought that surely some other oenophile on this board might have experienced it also.
I thank you all for your responses.
P.S. Screw the rashes. I'm enjoying my cabernets and barolos too much to stop drinking!
Histamines may not be the issue. Tyramine is an ingredient in win and other cured and aged foods such as cheeses that may cause similar reactions or life-threatiening ones - especially in peopl on older generation antidepressants andthe like.

Irwin, I agree, by all means do not eschew the wine....
Allergies are a much ampler topic than can be solved by "no drinking red".

Two remarks though:

- no sulphites, no wine. If you're allergic to (even small amounts of) sulphites, don't drink wine.

- test the grapes.
Just "allergic to red" is in many case not a definition.
My wife gets swollen eyes and rash from syrah/shiraz.
No problems with cabernet or pinot noir (although many people don't support burgundy, and that's not a political nor a budgetary remark) and she deals flawlessly with all the whites we know of.
well Dave, at least you were 95% right. There are some producers who remove all sulfites through filtration and sell a 100% sulfite free wine. Sulfites are a natural by-product of fermintation, so it is in all wines, but they can be removed.

That's better than Humanity, who was not only 100% wrong, but also had a few facts 100% backwards.
Miss Wine, if you say 5% of all wine producers filter the sulphites out of their wines, I do not believe you.

If, apart from the irony and the fooling around, information in this thread is wrong or misleading, then please share your wisdom.

About allergies and pseudo-allergies I know a thing or two and I know also that there is a lot of wrong and misleading information about it in the medical world.

Which doesn't mean of course that you shouldn't see a medic when you're ill.
less than 1/10 of 1% is more like the amount of wine that has sulfites removed, maybe even 1/1000 of 1%. The facility I make wine at is also home to the largest producer of sulfite free wine in the world. Organic Wine Works, they make about 40,000 case total.

ok, it will take me 15-20 minutes or so...but I'll put something together...

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