After a busy Sunday I find myself with 4 1/2 pounds of Boudin Noir. I did more of an Asian Style by using rice as a binder instead of onion and apple. I also added a bit of Chinese red pepper and yellow curry, but tiny amounts (3-5 grams) so it's not particularly hot.

Last night we grilled one and just sliced it up. Looking for clever serving ideas though or side dishes that would go well. Any ideas?
Original Post
I buy the Fabrique Délices Boudin Noir at the local farmers market - it's the nearest thing I've found to a traditional British black pudding.

A real black pudding should be boiled, but sometimes these split so I've taken to grilling them. I serve them with crusty bread and English mustard, or as part of a healthy breakfast.

Left Bank in Santana Row used to have a great flatbread with boudin noir - I think they had leeks, cheese and arugula on it.

Cafe Bastille in San Francisco serves it with mashed potatoes and apples cooked in red wine - http://blogs.sfweekly.com/food...best_dishes_2011.php

Apples are often an accompaniment in England - the first time I ever had black pudding in a restaurant it came with poached apples and a mustard sauce.

Last time I was in England I cooked dinner for the family - one of the courses was Lincolnshire sausage, black pudding and haggis - I made a sauce with cream, whisky and english mustard that worked well.

I've seen black pudding crumbled into mashed potatoes as a side dish.
I've seen it served as an accompaniment to game birds such as pigeon.

My scottish brother-in-law makes 'clapshot' - basically mashed turnips and potatoes - which he serves with haggis; it works with black pudding too.
Pan-seared scallops, boudin noir, and some mushy peas/pea puree. Sear the boudin also, and stack a scallop on top of a boudin slice (or vice versa).
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
Pan-seared scallops, boudin noir, and some mushy peas/pea puree. Sear the boudin also, and stack a scallop on top of a boudin slice (or vice versa).


Futronic, do you remember the Boudin and foie gras torte at Le Pied de Cochon a few years ago?
That was something to remember!

Recipie should be somewhere on the net.
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
Might not be exactly what you're looking for, but a small portion might go nice as part of a traditional Irish breakfast!


One of the inns we stayed at in Scotland served it with a duck egg, bacon, and toast for breakfast.
quote:
Originally posted by Stefania Wine:
After a busy Sunday I find myself with 4 1/2 pounds of Boudin Noir. I did more of an Asian Style by using rice as a binder instead of onion and apple. I also added a bit of Chinese red pepper and yellow curry, but tiny amounts (3-5 grams) so it's not particularly hot.

Last night we grilled one and just sliced it up. Looking for clever serving ideas though or side dishes that would go well. Any ideas?


port and marinaded grilled pork intestines
quote:
Originally posted by Vinaigre:
quote:
Originally posted by futronic:
Pan-seared scallops, boudin noir, and some mushy peas/pea puree. Sear the boudin also, and stack a scallop on top of a boudin slice (or vice versa).


Futronic, do you remember the Boudin and foie gras torte at Le Pied de Cochon a few years ago?
That was something to remember!

Recipie should be somewhere on the net.


That was awesome! The recipe is in the Au Pied de Cochon cookbook, and a variation on it is in the APdC Sugar Shack cookbook too.
quote:
Originally posted by Board-O:
quote:
Originally posted by Vino Bevo:
Might not be exactly what you're looking for, but a small portion might go nice as part of a traditional Irish breakfast!


One of the inns we stayed at in Scotland served it with a duck egg, bacon, and toast for breakfast.


I loved SO MANY things about Ireland, and the traditional breakfast was one. Eggs, slab of bacon, grilled mushrooms, grilled tomato, sausages, brown bread with Irish butter, and strong coffee. The only thing that saved me was all the walking we did later in the day!
Great ideas so far. The book I've been working from "Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing" actually has you poach the sausage at 170 degrees after stuffing which really seemed to help with grilling.

I also did duck confit this weekend so I have fat to work with. Thinking duck eggs, sausage and duck fat potatoes would be a good combo for breakfast or dinner. I also have some Fois Gras about and could come up with something clever there.

G-Man - Hot Pot was really the idea so I'll do another batch in the Fall to use in 'Blood and Guts'. I was trying to come up with Auntie Grace's hot pot blood in a sausage form.

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